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Polish team creates transparent cryogenic temperature sensor

Jan 08, 2017

Researchers from the Lodz University of Technology in Poland have designed a transparent, flexible cryogenic temperature sensor with graphene structures as sensing elements. Such sensors could be useful for any field that requires operating in low-temperatures, such as medical diagnostics, space exploration and aviation, processing and storage of food and scientific research.

Making graphene transparent cryogenic temperature sensors

The sensors were repeatedly cooled from room temperature to cryogenic temperature. Graphene structures were characterized using Raman spectroscopy. The observation of the resistance changes as a function of temperature indicates the potential use of graphene in the construction of temperature sensors. The temperature characteristics of the analyzed graphene sensors exhibit no clear anomalies or strong non-linearity in the entire studied temperature range (as compared to the typical carbon sensor).

Exeter team unveils novel graphene production method that could accelerate commercial graphene use

Dec 14, 2016

Researchers from the University of Exeter have developed a new method for creating entire device arrays directly on the copper substrates used for commercial manufacture of graphene. Complete and fully-functional devices can then be transferred to a substrate of choice, such as silicon, plastics or even textiles.

Exeter University's new graphene production method image

This new approach is said to be cheaper, simpler and less time consuming than conventional ways of producing graphene-based devices, thus holding real potential to open up the use of cheap-to-produce graphene devices for a host of applications from gas and biomedical sensors to displays.

The Graphene Flagship designs a graphene-based NFC antenna

Nov 30, 2016

The Graphene Flagship's Italian partner CNR-ISOF has found that it is possible to use graphene to produce fully flexible NFC antennas. By combining material characterization, computer modelling and engineering of the device, the Graphene Flagship researchers designed an antenna that could exchange information with near-field communication devices such as a mobile phone, matching the performance of conventional metallic antennas.

Graphene-based NFC antenna by the Flagship image

The graphene-based NFC antennas are chemically inert, highly resistant to thousands of bending cycles and can be deposited on different standard polymeric substrates or silk tissues. The fully flexible graphene NFC device demonstrators were tested with a smartphone through the NFC reader App by the Graphene Flagship partner STMicroelectronics, showing good functionality whether flat or fixed on curved objects.

Graphene-based transparent electrodes to promote stroke and epilepsy research

Oct 20, 2016

Scientists at the University of Wisconsin–Madison have looked into graphene-based microelectrocorticography (uECoG) arrays, used in neuroscience researcher, searching for possibilities to expand the use of the arrays in areas such as the research of stroke or epilepsy. Researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Medtronic PLC Neuromodulation, the University of Washington, and Mahidol University in Bangkok, Thailand were also involved in this study.

Graphene transparent electrodes for neuroscience image

The researchers see graphene as one of the most promising candidates for transparent neural electrodes, because the material has a UV to IR transparency of more than 90%, in addition to its high electrical and thermal conductivity, flexibility, and biocompatibility. That allows for simultaneous high-resolution imaging and optogenetic control, according to the team.

Graphene 3D Lab introduces flexible conductive TPU filament

Oct 11, 2016

Graphene 3D Labs logoGraphene 3D Lab, a leader in the development, manufacturing and marketing of proprietary composites and coatings based on graphene and other advanced materials, recently announced the release of a new product. The Company will now offer a filament for 3D printing that is both highly electrically conductive and flexible.

G3L reports that the enhanced properties of this product make it ideal for applications involving flexible sensors, electromagnetic/radiofrequency shielding, flexible conductive traces and electrodes to be used in wearable electronics. This new material will be available for purchase in 1.75mm diameter 100 gram spools at the Company's on-line store, www.blackmagic3D.com, under the trade name of "Conductive Flexible TPU Filament".