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Graphene enables non-metal magnet

Mar 07, 2017

Researchers at the Czech Republic created magnetized carbon by treating graphene layers with non-metallic elements, said to be the first non-metal magnet to maintain its magnetic properties at room temperature. The researchers say such magnetic graphene-based materials have potential applications in the fields of spintronics, biomedicine and electronics.

By treating graphene with other non-metallic elements such as fluorine, hydrogen, and oxygen, the scientists were able to create a new source of magnetic moments that communicate with each other even at room temperature. This discovery is seen as "a huge advancement in the capabilities of organic magnets".

Exeter team designs a novel method of engineering computer chips using graphene oxide

Mar 05, 2017

Researchers from the University of Exeter have developed a method using graphene oxide flakes that could be used to create the next generation of computers. The Exeter team used microfluidics technology to develop a new method of engineering computer chips that’s easier and less expensive than the current methodology.

The microfluidics approach uses minute channels to control the flow and direction of tiny quantities of fluid. The tests performed at the University of Exeter involved flakes of graphene oxide, mixed into the fluid, which was then mixed together in the channels to create the chips. The researchers used an advanced light-based procedure to facilitate the creation of three-dimensional structures that comprise the resulting chip.

Graphene coating on copper wires may help prevent electromigration and help minimize future electronics

Feb 21, 2017

As electronics keep shrinking in size, several problems arise. One of these is that the copper wires that connect transistors to form complex circuits need to be very thin, but carry so much current that can cause them to break apart due to atoms being knocked out of place. One way of solving this, studied by a group led by Stanford University, is to wrap copper with graphene. The group found that this can alleviate this major problem called electromigration.

stanford team solve electromigration problem with graphene coating image

This was presented at a recent IEEE meeting that addressed the coming problems for copper interconnects and debated ways of getting around them. Growing graphene around copper wires can help prevent electromigration, and also seems to bring down the resistance of the copper wires. Generally speaking, the narrower the wire, the higher its resistance. “Interconnects have had to shrink while increasing the current densities by 20 times,” said Intel Fellow Ruth Brain at the meeting.

A novel doping method could open the door to FLG use as transparent conducting electrodes

Feb 15, 2017

Researchers from King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), in collaboration with the Georgia Institute of Technology, have recently demonstrated a simple, solution-based, method for surface doping of few-layer graphene (FLG) using novel dopants (metal-organic molecules) that show a minimal effect on the optical transmission as compared to other dopants like metal chlorides.

This work investigates the effect of dopant strength and dosage on the electronic and electrical transport properties of doped FLG. Moreover, It reveals fundamental differences between the doping results in single layer graphene and few-layer graphene. The study focused on few-layer CVD graphene, rather than single-layer CVD graphene, a somewhat less common area of research to date.

A graphene interlayer enhanced the performance of Schottky diodes

Feb 09, 2017

A team of researchers affiliated with UNIST has designed a technique that greatly enhances the performance of Schottky Diodes (metal-semiconductor junction) used in electronic devices. The research findings are especially interesting as they address the contact resistance problem of metal-semiconductors.

Graphene interlayer improves diodes image

The researchers have created a new type of diode with a graphene insertion layer sandwiched between metal and semiconductor. They demonstrated that this graphene layer not only suppresses the material intermixing substantially, but also matches well with the theoretical prediction that "In the case of silicon semiconductors, the electrical properties of the junction surfaces hardly change regardless of the type of metal they use".