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Graphene enables solar-powered "electronic skin" with sensing abilities

Mar 23, 2017

Researchers at the University of Glasgow have used graphene to develop a robotic hand with solar-powered skin, which may open the door to the development of prosthetic limbs or robots with a sense of touch.

Graphene prosthetic hand image

The team created the skin with the help of a single atomic layer of graphene, in a method that includes integrating power-generating photovoltaic cells into the electronic skin. The scientists say that “Whatever light is available, 98 percent is going and hitting the solar cell”, explaining that a solar panel is located just under the surface of the clear graphene skin. “it is generating power that can be used to get the sensitivity, the tactile feeling”.

Skeleton Technologies launches graphene-based engine start supercapacitor

Mar 19, 2017

Skeleton Technologies, developer and manufacturer of high energy and power density supercapacitors, has announced launching a new graphene-based engine start module to help power heavy industry vehicles in extreme conditions. Called SkelStart Engine Start Module 2.0, it is available in 24V and 12V versions and is based on the graphene-based SkelCap supercapacitors, which Skeleton says provide the highest power and energy density on the market.

Skeleton's new graphene-based supercapacitor image

The new module’s casing is made of non-flammable material that is resistant to vibration and shock, and is a stud terminal device in BCI Group 31 size. Skeleton states that “SkelStart Engine Start modules are designed to provide reliable engine starting in even the harshest conditions, as well as reduced ongoing costs on maintenance and replacement. Businesses can therefore expect their equipment to work cost effectively year-round, affording them peace of mind.”

Graphene may grant control over terahertz waves

Mar 07, 2017

Researchers from the University of Geneva, working with the Federal Polytechnic School in Zurich (ETHZ) and two Spanish research teams, have come up with a technique based on the use of graphene that allows for terahertz waves to be controlled accurately. This discovery paves the way for a practical use of terahertz waves, in particular for imaging and telecommunications.

Graphene to allow control over terahertz waves image

Terahertz waves allow for the detection of materials that are undetectable at other frequencies, but the use of these waves is limited by the absence of suitable devices and materials allowing to control them. The team developed a technique in which graphene allows for the potentially very quick control of both the intensity and the polarization of terahertz light. "The interaction between terahertz radiation and the electrons in graphene is very strong and we have therefore come to the hypothesis that it should be possible to use graphene to manage terahertz waves," the team explains.

Rutgers licenses microwave-based graphene production method to Everpower

Mar 07, 2017

Rutgers University has licensed a technology that allows for the mass production of high-quality graphene at a reduced cost to Everpower International Holdings, a New York-based investment company engaged in investing in emerging technologies and their integration into China, that has recently announced a collaboration agreement with Haydale.

The method uses microwaves to produce high-quality graphene from graphene oxide, and has the potential to generate large quantities of it at low cost. “The ability to manufacture graphene on a large scale will allow Everpower to test a variety of products containing the material.”

Graphene enables non-metal magnet

Mar 07, 2017

Researchers at the Czech Republic created magnetized carbon by treating graphene layers with non-metallic elements, said to be the first non-metal magnet to maintain its magnetic properties at room temperature. The researchers say such magnetic graphene-based materials have potential applications in the fields of spintronics, biomedicine and electronics.

By treating graphene with other non-metallic elements such as fluorine, hydrogen, and oxygen, the scientists were able to create a new source of magnetic moments that communicate with each other even at room temperature. This discovery is seen as "a huge advancement in the capabilities of organic magnets".