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Polish team creates transparent cryogenic temperature sensor

Jan 08, 2017

Researchers from the Lodz University of Technology in Poland have designed a transparent, flexible cryogenic temperature sensor with graphene structures as sensing elements. Such sensors could be useful for any field that requires operating in low-temperatures, such as medical diagnostics, space exploration and aviation, processing and storage of food and scientific research.

Making graphene transparent cryogenic temperature sensors

The sensors were repeatedly cooled from room temperature to cryogenic temperature. Graphene structures were characterized using Raman spectroscopy. The observation of the resistance changes as a function of temperature indicates the potential use of graphene in the construction of temperature sensors. The temperature characteristics of the analyzed graphene sensors exhibit no clear anomalies or strong non-linearity in the entire studied temperature range (as compared to the typical carbon sensor).

Exeter team unveils novel graphene production method that could accelerate commercial graphene use

Dec 14, 2016

Researchers from the University of Exeter have developed a new method for creating entire device arrays directly on the copper substrates used for commercial manufacture of graphene. Complete and fully-functional devices can then be transferred to a substrate of choice, such as silicon, plastics or even textiles.

Exeter University's new graphene production method image

This new approach is said to be cheaper, simpler and less time consuming than conventional ways of producing graphene-based devices, thus holding real potential to open up the use of cheap-to-produce graphene devices for a host of applications from gas and biomedical sensors to displays.

Graphene coating may solve the glass corrosion problem

Oct 21, 2016

Researchers at the Center for Multidimensional Carbon Materials (CMCM) within the Institute for Basic Science (IBS), have demonstrated a graphene coating that protects glass from corrosion. Their research has been said to hold potential for solving problems related to glass corrosion in several industries.

Graphene coating against glass corrosion image

The IBS scientists grew graphene on copper and transferred either one or two atom-thick layers of graphene onto both sides of rectangular pieces of glass. The effectiveness of the graphene coating was evaluated by water immersion testing and observing the differences between uncoated and coated glass. After 120 days of immersion in water at 60 C, uncoated glass samples had significantly increased in surface roughness and defects, and reduced in fracture strength. In contrast, both the single and double layer graphene-coated glasses had essentially no change in both fracture strength and surface roughness.

Graphene-based transparent electrodes to promote stroke and epilepsy research

Oct 20, 2016

Scientists at the University of Wisconsin–Madison have looked into graphene-based microelectrocorticography (uECoG) arrays, used in neuroscience researcher, searching for possibilities to expand the use of the arrays in areas such as the research of stroke or epilepsy. Researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Medtronic PLC Neuromodulation, the University of Washington, and Mahidol University in Bangkok, Thailand were also involved in this study.

Graphene transparent electrodes for neuroscience image

The researchers see graphene as one of the most promising candidates for transparent neural electrodes, because the material has a UV to IR transparency of more than 90%, in addition to its high electrical and thermal conductivity, flexibility, and biocompatibility. That allows for simultaneous high-resolution imaging and optogenetic control, according to the team.

Korea-based researchers develop rollable OLED using graphene electrodes

Jun 03, 2016

Researchers from Korea's KAIST institute developed a rollable OLED device that uses graphene-based electrodes. The researchers say that the new OLED is much more durable when bent compared to current devices made with ITO electrodes.

KAIST graphene-based OLED device photo

The electrodes were made from a stack of materials - titanium oxdies, graphene and conductive polymers. The new OLEDs were also brighter than current devices, and with a higher color gamut. This was achieved by maximizing the resonance within the OLED.