University of Washington team finds that carefully constructed stacks of graphene can exhibit highly correlated electron properties

A research team led by the University of Washington recently reported that carefully constructed stacks of graphene can exhibit highly correlated electron properties. The team also found evidence that this type of collective behavior likely relates to the emergence of exotic magnetic states.

“We’ve created an experimental setup that allows us to manipulate electrons in the graphene layers in a number of exciting new ways,” said co-senior author Matthew Yankowitz, a UW assistant professor of physics and of materials science and engineering. Yankowitz led the team with co-senior author Xiaodong Xu, a UW professor of physics and of materials science and engineering.

Chalmers team designs method for fabricating atomically sharp nanostructures

Researchers at Chalmers University in Sweden have recently reported a facile and controllable anisotropic wet etching method that allows scalable fabrication of transition metal dichalcogenides (TMD) metamaterials with atomic precision. The team says that this new method has great potential for various layered structures like MoS2 and WS2 and graphene.

Etching hexagonal nanostructures in TMD materials imageProcess of etching hexagonal nanostructures in TMD materials. Image from article

They showed that materials can be etched along certain crystallographic axes, such that the obtained edges are nearly atomically sharp and exclusively zigzag-terminated. This results in hexagonal nanostructures of predefined order and complexity, including few-nanometer-thin nanoribbons and nanojunctions. Thus, this method enables future studies of a broad range of metamaterials through atomically precise control of the structure.

First Graphene to collaborate with M&I Materials on development of graphene-enhanced products

First Graphene logo imageGraphene raw materials supplier First Graphene and UK-based specialist materials manufacturer M&I Materials have agreed to collaborate to develop an extended range of graphene-enhanced products.

Both companies are partners at Manchester’s Graphene Engineering and Innovation Centre (GEIC), a facility dedicated to the commercialization of graphene. The GEIC has played a big part in enabling this collaboration and has benefited both parties in terms of the close working relationship at the same location and the extensive facilities and support available on site.

Cooling graphene causes buckling that could further the search for quantum materials

Graphene buckles when cooled while attached to a flat surface, resulting in patterns that could benefit the search for novel quantum materials and superconductors, according to a recent Rutgers-led research.

Quantum materials host strongly interacting electrons with special properties, such as entangled trajectories, that could provide building blocks for super-fast quantum computers. They also can become superconductors that could slash energy consumption by making power transmission and electronic devices more efficient.

Graphene and MoS2 make for a highly light-absorbent and tunable material

Physicists at the University of Basel have created a novel structure with the ability to absorb almost all light of a selected wavelength, by layering different 2D materials: graphene and molybdenum disulfide.

A highly light-absorbent and tunable material made of graphene and MoS2 imageSchematic illustration of the electron-hole pairs (electron: pink, hole: blue), which are formed by absorption of light in the two-layer molybdenum disulfide layer. Credit: Nadine Leisgang and Lorenzo Ceccarelli, Department of Physics, University of Basel

The new structure's particular properties reportedly make it a candidate for applications in optical components or as a source of individual photons, which play a key role in quantum research.