Researchers find superconductivity that can be turned on and off in "magic angle" graphene

Researchers at MIT and National Institute for Materials Science in Tsukuba, Japan, have found a new and intriguing property of “magic-angle” graphene: superconductivity that can be turned on and off with an electric pulse, much like a light switch.

The discovery could lead to ultrafast, energy-efficient superconducting transistors for neuromorphic devices — electronics designed to operate in a way similar to the rapid on/off firing of neurons in the human brain.

Read the full story Posted: Jan 29,2023

Applied Graphene Materials says its shares will stop trading soon as it still searches for a buyer

In November 2022, Applied Graphene Materials (AGM) announced that it aimed to raise money to fund its operations, but was unable to do so. AGM Later said it received non-binding indicative proposals for its sale.

AGM now announced that trading in its shares will be suspended from next Wednesday (February 1st) as the company confirmed it will not publish its reports by the market deadline. The company has until the end of February before it runs out of money.

Read the full story Posted: Jan 28,2023

Researchers develop improved method for producing graphene-based gas sensors

Researchers from Penn State and University of Electronic Science and Technology of China recently enhanced their gas sensor manufacturing process through an in situ laser-assisted manufacturing approach, improving on their previous method of drop casting (dropping materials one by one onto a substrate using a pipette. 

Flexible gas sensors can be used as medical devices to identify health conditions by detecting oxygen or carbon dioxide levels in the breath or sweat. They are also useful for monitoring air quality in indoor or outdoor environments by detecting gas, biomolecules and chemicals. 

Read the full story Posted: Jan 27,2023

The Graphene Handbook, 2023 edition

We're happy to announce the tenth edition of Graphene-Info's very own Graphene Handbook, the most comprehensive resource on graphene technology, industry and market - now updated for 2023. Get your copy now to stay current on graphene research, development and market!

Reading this book, you'll learn all about:

  • The properties of graphene
  • Different production methods
  • Possible graphene applications
  • The latest graphene research
  • The current market for graphene materials and products
  • The main graphene challenges
  • Other promising 2D materials

The book also provides:

  • A history of graphene developments
  • A graphene investment guide
  • An introduction to graphene metrology and standardization
  • A comprehensive list of graphene companies
  • A guide to other carbon allotropes

The graphene handbook has been read by leading material engineers, business developers, researchers, equipment vendors, private investors and others who wish to learn more about graphene today and in the future. We truly believe that it is the best introduction to graphene!

Read the full story Posted: Jan 25,2023

Researchers deepen understanding of graphene growth on liquid metal catalysts

Liquid metal catalysts have recently been attracting attention for synthesizing high-quality 2D materials facilitated via the catalysts’ perfectly smooth surface. However, the microscopic catalytic processes occurring at the surface are still largely unclear because liquid metals escape the accessibility of traditional experimental and computational surface science approaches. 

An EU-funded collaboration of researchers that included teams from Fritz Haber Institute of the Max Planck Society, The European Synchrotron- ESRF, Technical University of Munich (TUM), Aarhus University,  Leiden University and Université Grenoble Alpes used novel in situ and in silico techniques to achieve an atomic-level characterization of the graphene adsorption height above liquid Cu, reaching quantitative agreement within 0.1 Å between experiment and theory.

Read the full story Posted: Jan 24,2023

Researchers develop graphene-based olfactory sensors to detect odor molecules

Researchers at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) and Toshiba Corporation recently demonstrated how graphene-based olfactory sensors could detect odor molecules depending on the design of peptide sequences. They showed that graphene field-effect transistors (GFETs) functionalized with designable peptides could be utilized to develop electronic devices that imitate olfactory receptors and then emulate the sense of smell by selectively detecting odor molecules.

Olfactory sensing is an integral part of many industries like food, cosmetics, healthcare, and environmental monitoring. Currently, most commonly utilized methods for detecting and evaluating odor molecules is called gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC–MS). While GC–MS is effective, it has certain limitations like confined sensitivity and heavy setup. As a result, researchers are in the search of user-friendly and highly sensitive alternatives.

Read the full story Posted: Jan 21,2023