Laser technique that opens a bandgap in graphene could allow for next-gen graphene electronics

Researchers from Purdue University, the University of Michigan and the Huazhong University of Science and Technology have used a technique called "laser shock imprinting" to permanently stress graphene into having a band gap, which could mean it would be possible to use it in various electronic components.

The researchers used a laser to create shock wave impulses that penetrated an underlying sheet of graphene. The laser shock stretches the graphene onto a permanent, trench-like mold. This caused the widening of band gap in graphene to a record 2.1 electronvolts. Previously, scientists achieved 0.5 electronvolts, barely reaching the benchmark to make graphene a semiconductor like silicon.

ZNShine to supply graphene-enhanced solar modules to the UAE

Znshine Solar, a Chinese solar module manufacturer, has announced signing a 100MW graphene-enhanced solar module supply agreement with UAE's Etihad Energy services as a result of Znshine's participation in the tender launched by DEWA (Dubai Electricity and Water Authority) in January.

CEO of Etihad Energy Services, Mr. Ali Mohammed Al Jassim, explained that the modules will be used in various projects as part of Shams Dubai, the leading initiative that supports the vision of the government to make Dubai one of the most sustainable cities in the world; it also supports diversifying the energy mix by promoting the use of clean and renewable energy sources to build a sustainable future for the Emirate.