Gnanomat launches two graphene-based nanocomposites

Spain-based Gnanomat recently announced the launch of its graphene-based nanocomposites.

Gnanomat launches graphene nanocomposites image

Gnanomat stated that its manufacturing process technology offers the possibility to generate a broad range of different advanced materials for use in different industrial applications. Further nanomaterials will, in the following months, be added to supply both research and industrial customers. These products will allow the Company's clients to perform preliminary tests and open the possibility to co-develop advanced materials that meet their technical demands. Gnanomat products formulation and process have been designed for supply at industrial quantities.

G2O Water Technologies expands following NPIF investment

G2O Water Technologies (G2O) has announced an expansion into a new laboratory at Liverpool City Region’s Sci-Tech Daresbury following a £600,000 investment, including £320,000 of funding from NPIF – Maven Equity Finance, managed by Maven and part of the Northern Powerhouse Investment Fund.

Headquartered in Manchester, the G2O uses graphene-based coatings technology to provide high quality and cost-effective solutions to a broad range of filtration applications. G2O’s technology is used for the treatment of water waste across multiple markets, including oil, gas and industrial.

New twist on graphene to boost optoelectronics

Researchers at University of California Berkeley, Washington University in St. Louis and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have stacked two sheets of graphene on top of each other and twisted them, which resulted in the conversion of a common linear material into one with nonlinear optical capabilities. This could prove useful for various everyday technologies — from spectroscopy and material analysis to communications and computing.

In the study of optics, scientists distinguish between linear and nonlinear materials. Most materials, including sheets of graphene, are linear. If you shine red light at a sheet of graphene, the photons will either be absorbed or scattered, but in any case - they will remain red.

The first International Graphene Awards winners are announced

The International Graphene Awards (IGA) was initiated by the Chinese Graphene Industry Association (CGIA) in collaboration with 50 graphene experts from all over the world.

In 2020 the IGA committee offered 5 different awards: for best graphene products, best graphene firm, industry promotion, industry demonstration and honorary award for the most contribution people in graphene industry.

AMD wins Future Leaders Fellowship award with leading Surrey researcher

Advanced Material Development logoAMD recently announced its success, in conjunction with Dr. Izabela Jurewicz from the University of Surrey, in the offer of an award from UKRI’s Future Leaders Fellowship (FLF) fund. This £1.6 million award is built around the work of Dr. Jurewicz at the University of Surrey in the field of graphene (and other 2D materials) within photonic crystals, where she focuses on optical color changes in the presence of different stimulants such as gases, radiation and more. The award will push her research forward and sponsor the transition into industry.

On completion of the award contract, Dr. Jurewicz will move to a full-time position with AMD at its main site on the Surrey Research Park, whilst maintaining full access to the laboratories at Surrey. She will also provide support and oversight to the established team at the University of Sussex under Professor Alan Dalton. AMD is one of the first commercial companies to receive such an award in partnership with a leading academic.

Applied Graphene Materials announces full year results

Applied Graphene Materials (AGM), producer of specialty graphene materials and dispersions, has announced its full year results for the year ended 31 July 2020.

AGM's launches new graphene-enhanced detailing spray for cars image

AGM reported "excellent commercial progress" made this year, with a number of major customer projects advancing throughout the year towards completion and product launch. The impact of coronavirus has reportedly caused some delays to customer projects however, AGM's development pipeline is said to continue to grow.

WMG and Senergy Innovations develop graphene-enabled all polymer solar thermal cell

Researchers led by Professor Tony McNally, from WMG, at the University of Warwick, in partnership with Senergy Innovations, have launched the first nanomaterial enabled all polymer solar thermal cell. This achievement was supported by funding from BEIS (Department for Business, Energy & Industrial Strategy).

The WMG/Senergy solar cell as it went in for testing image

The thermal properties of the polymers that were used were modified to enable heat from sunlight to be transferred with high efficiency to heat water in a low cost and sustainable way. The modular design of the cells reportedly allows for the rapid construction of a solar thermal cell array on both domestic and industry roofing.

ZEN Graphene Solutions announces collaboration agreement on carbon aerogels with German Aerospace Center

Zen Graphene Solutions logo imageZen Graphene Solutions recently announced that it has signed a new research collaboration agreement with the Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt (“DLR”, the German Aerospace Center) to investigate the use of Albany Pure graphene-based nanomaterials in the fabrication of novel carbon aerogel composites.

The goal of this collaborative research project titled, “Development of Innovative Composites based on Carbon Aerogels”, is to develop electrode materials for new generation batteries and will build on the collaboration between ZEN, DLR and Dr. Lukas Bichler at the University of British Columbia‐Okanagan Campus (UBC-O) that was previously reported.

Researchers design graphene-based broadband detector of terahertz radiation

Scientists from Russia and Germany have created a graphene-based broadband detector of terahertz radiation. The device could have potential for applications in communication and next-generation information transmission systems, security and medical equipment.

Graphene detector reveals THz light’s polarization image(a) shows a top view of the device, with the sensitive region magnified in (b). The labels S, D, and TG denote the source, drain, and top gate. A side section of the detector is shown in (c). Image from MIPT

The new detector relies on the interference of plasma waves. Plasma waves in metals and semiconductors have recently attracted much attention from researchers around the world. Like the more familiar acoustic waves, the ones that occur in plasmas are essentially density waves, too, but they involve charge carriers: electrons and holes. Their local density variation gives rise to an electric field, which nudges other charge carriers as it propagates through the material. This is similar to how the pressure gradient of a sound wave impels the gas or liquid particles in an ever expanding region. However, plasma waves die down rapidly in conventional conductors.

Researchers develop graphene-based supercapacitor to power wearable skin sensors

Researchers from the Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology in South Korea have recently developed a low-cost energy storage device to power electronic devices like wearable skin sensors. The supercapacitor, made with graphene ink that is sprayed onto flexible substrates, can be used for remote medical monitoring and diagnosis on wearable devices.

Graphene inks enable flexible and mechanically durable planar supercapacitors image

Materials scientist Sungwon Lee shared that as the demand for wearable devices and remote diagnosis has increased, scientists have focused on developing electronic skin devices. The team focused on "extremely tiny and flexible energy devices as a power source."