Graphene-based electrochemical sensor can detect COVID-19 in less than five minutes

University of Illinois researchers have used graphene to develop a rapid, ultrasensitive test using a paper-based electrochemical sensor that can detect the presence of the virus in less than five minutes.

COVID-19 electrochemical sensing platform image

“Currently, we are experiencing a once-in-a-century life-changing event,” said bioengineering graduate student and co-leader of the study, Maha Alafeef. “We are responding to this global need from a holistic approach by developing multidisciplinary tools for early detection and diagnosis and treatment for SARS-CoV-2.”

Graphene enables stretchable micro-supercapacitors to self-power wearable devices

An international team of researchers, led by Huanyu "Larry" Cheng, a Professor at Penn State, has used graphene to design a stretchable system that can harvest energy from human breathing and motion for use in wearable health-monitoring devices.

High-energy all-in-one stretchable micro-supercapacitor arrays based on 3D laser-induced graphene foams image

According to Cheng, current versions of batteries and supercapacitors powering wearable and stretchable health-monitoring and diagnostic devices have many shortcomings, including low energy density and limited stretchability. "This is something quite different than what we have worked on before, but it is a vital part of the equation," Cheng said, noting that his research group and collaborators tend to focus on developing the sensors in wearable devices. "While working on gas sensors and other wearable devices, we always need to combine these devices with a battery for powering. Using micro-supercapacitors gives us the ability to self-power the sensor without the need for a battery."

ZEN Graphene Solutions and NPNL jointly receive NSERC grant

Zen Graphene Solutions logo imageZEN Graphene Solutions, in partnership with Professor Mohammad Arjmand, has announced the award of a CAD$780,000 (around USD$609,600) Alliance Grant - part from the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC) and the rest from a combination of cash and in kind contributions from ZEN).

Alliance Grants are awarded through a competitive peer review process, and this proposal, titled “Synthesis of Graphene Nanomaterials and Development of Their Multifunctional Polymer Nanocomposites”, is ZEN’s highest single monetary grant award from NSERC to date and supports NSERC’s growing interest in nanomaterials.

Researchers design new platform that generates hybrid light-matter excitations in highly charged graphene

Columbia researchers recently announced that they were the first to use the static charge between 2D atomic layers to provide a new route for generating graphene plasmon polaritons without an external power source or chemical dopants.

Among graphene's many unique properties is the ability to support highly confined electromagnetic waves coupled to oscillations of electronic charge—plasmon polaritons—that have potentially broad applications in nanotechnology, including biosensing, quantum information, and solar energy. However, in order to support plasmon polaritons, graphene must be charged by applying a voltage to a nearby metal gate, which greatly increases the size and complexity of nanoscale devices.

Directa Plus expects a strong 2020 with good progress across all of its vertical markets

Italy-based graphene developer Directa Plus says that it has made "continued good progress" during H2 2020, with new orders and agreements across all of the company's verticals. Directa+ expects its 2020 revenues to reach around €6 million, exceeding current consensus market expectations.

Directa Plus' new graphene masks image

Directa+ says that the improvement has been primarily driven by the sales of G+ enhanced face masks, including Co-masks, which have proven very popular with both individual and corporate customers and have generated strong demand. The strengthening performance of Setcar, the Environmental division, has also contributed to the improved revenue expectations for the current year.

Researchers design a lightweight and highly efficient graphene heat pipe

Researchers at Sweden-based Chalmers University of Technology, in collaboration with researchers in China and Italy, have found that graphene-based heat pipes can help solve the problems of cooling electronics and power systems used in avionics, data centers, and other power electronics.

Cooling electronics efficiently with graphene-enhanced heat pipes imageA) Image of a real GHP; B) schematic designing of the GHP; C) working principle of the GHP

Electronics and data centers need to be efficiently cooled and rid of excess heat in order to function properly. Currently, heat pipes are usually made of copper, aluminum or their alloys. Due to the relatively high density and limited heat transmission capacity of these materials, heat pipes are facing severe challenges in future power devices and data centers.

Paragraf, Rolls-Royce, TT Electronics and the Compound Semiconductor Applications Catapult join to establish a first-ever supply chain for graphene Hall Effect sensors

Paragraf, UK-based graphene electronic sensors and devices company, announced that it is helping to realize an industry first by implementing a supply chain for graphene Hall-Effect sensors used in high-temperature Power Electronics, Electric Machines and Drives (PEMD) within the aerospace sector.

Paragraf graphene Hall Effect sensors image

Named High-T Hall, the project stems from the UK Research and Innovation’s (UKRI) ‘Driving the Electric Revolution’ challenge and brings together Paragraf, Rolls-Royce, TT Electronics (Aero Stanrew) and the Compound Semiconductor Applications Catapult (CSA Catapult). It is set to demonstrate how graphene-based Hall Effect sensors can operate reliably at high temperatures, paving the way for more efficient electric engines in aerospace and beyond.

Researchers find that graphene quantum dots are biodegradable by human enzymes

A study recently conducted by Graphene Flagship partners the University of Strasbourg and CNRS, France, in collaboration with Nanyang Technological University in Singapore, has shown that graphene quantum dots are biodegradable by two enzymes found in the human body.

Graphene quantum dots (GQDs) are tiny flakes usually smaller than five nanometres that have potential for many applications. GQDs are fluorescent, so they can absorb light and then emit it, often at a different wavelength. They are also so small that they can penetrate cells. Together, these properties pave the way to a wide array of applications in bioimaging, biosensing and new therapies - among other potential uses.