Article last updated on: Jan 29, 2019

The latest graphene ink news:

Spanish team develops new graphene-enhanced face masks as protection against coronavirus

A consortium of Spanish scientists and companies, in which the University of Granada (UGR) is participating, is working on the development of new efficient prophylactic facemasks to combat the Coronavirus responsible for COVID-19. These masks will be made of non-woven textiles specially modified with graphene and derivative materials.

Researchers at the Condensed Matter Physics Centre (IFIMAC) of the Autonomous University of Madrid (UAM), which leads the project, are working on the development of new technologies to manufacture protective facemasks and, more generally, safer fabrics that help avoid contagion via infectious pathogens and, more specifically, viral particles.

Haydale and IRPC progress to phase 2 of conductive ink development project

Haydale logoHaydale has announced that, further to a successful Phase 1 collaboration agreement with IRPC Public Company (IRPC), a Phase 2 collaboration agreement has now been signed between the two companies. The Agreement will see IRPC developing transparent graphene and functionalized acetylene black conductive inks for RFID, NFC and related applications.

Haydale is to functionalize IRPC's acetylene black product to create the organic RFID ink. The success of this collaboration is expected to pave the way to numerous opportunities in printed electronic applications and be more environmentally friendly than existing inks.

Archer Materials announces progress with its graphene biosensors for disease detection

Archer Exploration logo imageArcher Materials has reported that it is making progress with its graphene-based biosensor technology with recent work spanning technology development, commercialization and patent prosecution.



This work includes the development of portable hardware to interface with Archer’s biosensor technology with simplified sensor response.

Zen Graphene Solutions and Graphene Composites collaborate on graphene ink on fabrics for Coronavirus protection

Zen Graphene Solutions logo imageGraphene Composites logo imageZEN Graphene Solutions has announced an international collaboration with UK-based Graphene Composites to fight COVID-19 by developing a potential virucidal graphene-based composite ink that can be applied to fabrics including N95 face masks and other personal protective equipment (PPE) for significantly increased protection. Once the development, testing, and confirmation of the graphene ink's virucidal ability have been completed, the ink will then be incorporated into fabrics used for PPE.

Francis Dubé, CEO of ZEN commented, "We are pleased to be collaborating with GC and be on the forefront of a new innovative technology that could contribute to combating the deadly COVID-19 virus. The development of this potential COVID-19 virucidal graphene ink is coming at a crucial time to provide effective PPE supplies for the safety of frontline workers and hospital staff." Dr. Dubé continued, "The current N95 masks trap the virus but don't kill it. Our testing will demonstrate if the graphene ink is an effective virucide which would kill the virus as this could make a big difference to people's safety. We have been very impressed by the Graphene Composites team and look forward to continued collaborations."

Sussex team granted £1 million funding to develop graphene-based applications like camouflage technology, smart tires and more

A University of Sussex research team, led by Professor Alan Dalton, has received new funding of £1 million from private company Advanced Material Development, to pursue their research into graphene and other nanomaterials.

The team will conduct research into various avenues, including camouflage technology to stop soldiers from being spotted by thermal imaging cameras or night vision goggles. The team will also develop their research into anti-counterfeiting graphene inks which can be printed onto clothes and medicine containers; incorporated into smart tires which monitor for problems; used on banknotes; included on metal-free radio-frequency identification tags (RFID) tags for supermarkets to track products; and wearable technology, including monitors for babies’ heartbeats or diabetic patients’ glucose levels.