Article last updated on: Jan 25, 2019

The latest graphene sensor news:

BioMed X completes development of graphene-based biosensors for near-patient testing

BioMed X has announced the completion of its first research collaboration project with Roche Diagnostics in the field of nanomaterial-based biosensors for near patient testing. BioMed X successfully achieved the proof of principle for a new sensor platform allowing the analysis of several different parameters from blood samples with one single device.

The project was initiated in 2015 as a call for application using BioMed X’s proprietary crowdsourcing platform for project proposals. As a result of an international innovation challenge, a team of early-career researchers from five different countries worked in Germany on the design of a field effect transistor-based multimodal sensing platform for proteins, blood gases and electrolytes, metabolites and enzymes with a single-use disposable material for point-of-care diagnostics.

ICFO designs new graphene-based flexible and transparent wearable health trackers

ICFO researchers have recently demonstrated a new class of graphene-based flexible and transparent wearable devices that are conformable to the skin and can provide continuous and accurate measurements of multiple human vital signs.

ICFO's new flexible and transparent graphene health tracker image



These devices can measure heart rate, respiration rate and blood pulse oxygenation, as well as exposure to UV radiation from the sun. While the device measures the different parameters, the read-out is visualized and stored on a mobile phone interface connected to the wearable via Bluetooth. In addition, the device can operate battery-free since it is charged wirelessly through the phone.

Chalmers team designs a graphene-based detector that may revolutionize space telescopes

Researchers from Chalmers University of Technology have demonstrated a graphene-based detector with the potential to revolutionize the sensors used in next-generation space telescopes. Beyond superconductors, there are few materials that can meet the requirements for making ultra-sensitive and fast terahertz (THz) detectors for astronomy. Chalmers researchers have shown that engineered graphene adds a new material paradigm for THz heterodyne detection.

"Graphene might be the only known material that remains an excellent conductor of electricity/heat even when having, effectively, no electrons. We have reached a near zero-electron scenario in graphene, also called Dirac point, by assembling electron-accepting molecules on its surface. Our results show that graphene is an exceptionally good material for THz heterodyne detection when doped to the Dirac point," says Samuel Lara-Avila, assistant professor at the Quantum Device Physics Laboratory and lead author of the paper.

Imagine Intelligent Materials develops sensing solution for large surface areas

Australia-based graphene and data analytics company, Imagine Intelligent Materials, has developed an integrated sensing solution that uses graphene coatings and edge-based signal processing devices to collect data from objects with large surface areas.

World first sensing solution for large surface areas by Imagine IM image

Proven over areas as large as 4,000 square meters, the system gathers data such as pressure, moisture, stress and temperature and is aimed at industrial and consumer applications in the IoT market.

Researchers develop smallest graphene-based accelerometer ever reported

Researchers from Sweden and Germany (from KTH Royal Institute of Technology, RWTH Aachen University and Research Institute AMO GmbH, Aachen) have developed the smallest graphene-based accelerometer ever reported. This achievement has been referred to as "a breakthrough for body sensor and navigation technologies".

For the past few decades microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) have been the basis for research and innovations. Now there is a move to the next level – nano-electromechanical systems, or NEMS. Xuge Fan, a researcher in the Department for Micro and Nanosystems at KTH, says that the unique material properties of graphene have enabled them to build these ultra-small accelerometers. “Based on the surveys and comparisons we have made, we can say that this is the smallest reported electromechanical accelerometer in the world,” Fan said.