Article last updated on: Jan 25, 2019

The latest graphene sensor news:

Novel graphene-based sensors function in harsh environments

King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) and University of California Berkeley researchers have found that graphene-based sensors can perform in harsh environments that are inhospitable to other existing technologies.

Multisensory graphene sensors for various uses imageThe structure of graphene sensors for pH (top left), salinity (lower left) and temperature (right). Credit: 2020 Shaikh & Hussain, from Phys.org

"Graphene has been projected as a miracle material for years now, but its application in harsh environmental conditions was unexplored," says Sohail Shaikh, who has developed the new sensors, together with KAUST's Muhammad Hussain. "Existing sensor technologies operate in a very limited range of environmental conditions, failing or becoming unreliable if there is much deviation," Shaikh adds.

Paragraf’s graphene Hall Effect sensors found to be resistant to neutron irradiation

In June 2020, Paragraf entered into a working partnership with the Magnetic Measurement section at CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research, to demonstrate how new opportunities for magnetic measurements are opened up through the unique properties of its graphene sensor, particularly its negligible planar Hall effect. Now, Paragraf has demonstrated the ability of its graphene Hall Effect sensors to withstand high levels of radiation.

Paragraf’s graphene Hall Effect sensors image



This conclusion, based on testing from the National Physical Laboratory (NPL), proves that ‘unpackaged’ Hall Effect sensors can be used in high-radiation environments such as space. The project was funded by Innovate UK, the UK’s innovation agency.

Graphene quantum dots help check water content in soil

A recent study by researchers at Gauhati University, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay and DAIICT in India has demonstrated a soil moisture sensor made from graphene quantum dots, which are nanometer-sized fragments of graphene.

Water sensors are vital for various agriculture applications, like keeping track of the watering schedule for a large number of plants, such as for a field of crops. Soil moisture sensors measure the water content in the soil to avoiid crop destruction by under or over watering the field.

Cardea Bio raises $7.5 million in series A2 financing

Following a $7.8 Million Series A-1 financing announced in March 2019, Cardea, (formerly called Nanomedical Diagnostics), a U.S-based manufacturer of a biology-enabled transistor technology made from graphene-based biosensors, now announced another $7.5 Million raised in the Series A2 Financing.

The capital will help accelerate the growth and development of the Company’s proprietary Tech+Bio Infrastructure and chipsets that enable Cardea’s Innovation Partners to bring “Powered by Cardea" products to market with features and competitive advantages Cardea defines as "never seen before".

Stretchable and ultrasensitive NO2 sensors based on rGO and MOS2 nanocomposites

Researchers at Penn State, Northeastern University and five universities in China have developed and tested a stretchable, wearable gas sensor for environmental sensing.

Stretchable, ultrasensitive, and low-temperature NO2 sensors based on MoS2@rGO nanocomposites image

The sensor combines a newly developed laser-induced graphene foam material with a unique form of molybdenum disulfide and reduced-graphene oxide nanocomposites. The researchers were interested in seeing how different morphologies of the gas-sensitive nanocomposites affect the sensitivity of the material to detecting nitrogen dioxide molecules at very low concentration. To change the morphology, they packed a container with very finely ground salt crystals.