Zenyatta Ventures and Lakehead University announce scale-up of GO program

Jun 16, 2017

Zenyatta Ventures has announced a program for a scaled-up production method of its graphite to graphene oxide for applications like water treatment, sensors, supercapacitors and Li‐ion batteries. The program is receiving grant funding from the Ontario Centres for Excellence (OCE) to allow a team of scientists at Lakehead University in Ontario, Canada to carry out this research.

The OCE funding helps established Ontario‐based companies develop, implement and commercialize technical innovations by supporting partnerships with publicly‐funded post‐secondary institutions. The focus of the research work will be on scaling up production methods for Zenyatta’s graphite to GO, a first critical step towards commercialization of the technology. The OCE VIP II $100,000 grant will be administered over two years and Zenyatta will be contributing $50,000 in cash and $60,000 in‐kind support to the project.

Skeleton uses curved graphene in its new supercapacitor-based energy storage system

Jun 01, 2017

Skeleton Technologies has unveiled SkelGrid, an energy storage system for industrial power applications, based on the company's curved graphene supercapacitor technology. The system is meant to ensure reliable power quality in manufacturing plants, data centers, and more.

Skeleton Technologies' new SkelGrid system image

SkelGrid is said to provide the highest power and energy density on the market in the industry standard electrical cabinet or container format. The SkelGrid product family is based on SkelRack modules, which can be installed in industry standard 19”, 600mm deep cabinets, and in 20 or 40 ft. containers to provide short-term power at the megawatt level. The SkelGrid family has maximum power ratings ranging from 520 kW up to 1500 kW, and as a modular product, its components can be configured according to customers’ needs.

Graphene-based biological supercapacitors may enable improved pacemakers and implantable medical devices

May 24, 2017

Researchers from UCLA and the University of Connecticut have designed a biological supercapacitor which operates using ions derived from bodily fluids. The team predicts that this work could lead to longer-lasting cardiac pacemakers and other implantable medical devices.

The biosupercapacitor, which features graphene layered with modified human proteins as an electrode, could be used in next-generation implantable devices to speed bone growth, promote healing or stimulate the brain.

Zap&Go awarded with $1.6 million from the EU to continue development of its graphene supercapacitor enhanced power tools

May 23, 2017

UK-based graphene supercapacitor developer Zap&Go announced that it was awarded with a $1.6 million USD from the European Union to perfect the prototype cordless tools powered by its fast-charging graphene supercapacitors.

ZapGo graphene supercapacitor powered tool prototype (PE Europe 2017)

Zap&Go initiated a self-funded feasibility study to embed its graphene supercapacitors in cordless tools. The company says that it has received commitments from major OEMs in joint development agreements. In this new EU-funded project, Zap&Go intends to further develop its power modules and electronics, integrating them with cordless tools such as vacuum cleaners and power drills, and finally build units to conduct customer trials.

Graphene supercapacitors minimize the need for pacemaker surgeries

May 18, 2017

Researchers from Egypt and the United States have reportedly created ultrathin, biocompatible supercapacitors that can be used as efficient and long-lasting power sources for implantable devices such as pacemakers, brain stimulators and more.

The scientists made the supercapacitors using graphene, a muscle protein and biofluids as electrolytes. The team reports that such supercapacitors can power pacemakers for a long time by utilizing protein and biofluids available in the body, reducing the need to perform surgery to replace drained power sources.

Versarien - Think you know graphene? Think again!Versarien - Think you know graphene? Think again!