Elecjet launches crowdfunding campaign for new graphene power bank

In January 2019, Elecjet announced its plans to launch a Kickstarter campaign for its graphene-enhanced USB-C / A fast charging power bank. Now, Elecjet is back with the Elecjet Apollo Ultra - a 37Wh (10,000mAh) power bank that can be charged at 100W, and can output at up to 87W across its two ports.

Elecjet improves the lithium cells that are inside every device, by using what it calls "composite graphene cells”. It presumably means mixing a graphene solution in with the lithium in the cathode, and then adding layers of graphene coating the anode.

SmartIR uses graphene to allow satellites to control thermal radiation

SmartIR, a spin-out of the University of Manchester, is working on a graphene-based smart coating for satellites, to allow them to control thermal radiation on demand, depending on whether a satellite’s surface is Earth’s shadow or on the side closest to the Sun.

This graphene technology is said to be a far more optimal solution as it is lightweight, has a low power consumption, can respond quickly to temperature changes, operates across the infrared spectrum, and involves no moving parts.

NEO Battery Materials announces plans to use graphene in its batteries

Canada-based NEO Battery Materials, focused on battery metals and materials, recently stated its plan to use graphene in its batteries.

Neo Battery Materials said in a recent announcement that it "intends to implement graphene as a conductive additive when manufacturing the silicon anode materials and as a potential candidate as a nanocoating layer to enhance cycling durability. The conductive additive improves the electrical conductivity of the active material (i.e., silicon and/or graphite) and is an essential component along with the binder and active material to fabricate the end-product anode".

Nanotech Energy to build new campus to expand manufacturing capabilities of graphene batteries

U.S-based graphene batteries developer Nanotech Energy is reportedly planning to expand its facilities and develop a 517-acre campus within the Tahoe Reno Industrial Center. The first building is slated to open in Q4 2022.

The high-volume facility will significantly increase Nanotech Energy’s manufacturing capacity to produce and scale its patented, non-flammable Graphene-Organolyte™ batteries and other graphene-powered products, including EMI (electromagnetic interference) shielding, transparent conducting electrodes, conductive inks, conductive adhesives and silver nanowires.

Recent research and industry news on graphene supercapacitors

Supercapacitors are gaining in popularity, as these devices can store and release energy very quickly, and are useful in many applications -including energy generation, grid power support, automotive, consumer devices and more.

Skeleton graphene supercapacitors SkelMod 162V photo

Graphene has the potential to increase the performance of supercapacitors, and the material is already used in many commercial products by several companies.

Researchers demonstrate Doppler effect and sonic boom in graphene devices

A team of researchers from universities in Loughborough, Nottingham, Manchester, Lancaster and Kansas (US) has revealed that sonic boom and Doppler-shifted sound waves can be created in a graphene transistor.

When a police car speeds past you with its siren blaring, you hear a distinct change in the frequency of the siren’s noise. This is the Doppler effect. When a jet aircraft’s speed exceeds the speed of sound (about 760 mph), the pressure it exerts upon the air produces a shock wave which can be heard as a loud supersonic boom or thunderclap. This is the Mach effect. The scientists discovered that a quantum mechanical version of these phenomena occurs in an electronic transistor made from high-purity graphene.

Researchers examine twisted bilayer graphene's intriguing interactions with light

In 'magic angle' graphene, especially near the angle of 1 degree, the electrons slow down dramatically, favoring interactions between the electrons. Such interactions give rise to a new type of superconductivity and insulating phases in twisted bilayer graphene. Along with many other fascinating properties discovered in the past three years, this material has proven to display extremely rich physical phenomena, but most importantly, it has shown to be an easily controllable quantum material. Up until now, the interaction between twisted bilayer graphene and light was shown to have fascinating outcomes on a theoretical level, but no experiment has so far been able to clearly show how this interaction works.

In a recent work, ICFO researchers Niels Hesp, Iacopo Torre, David Barcons-Ruiz and Hanan Herzig Sheinfux, led by ICREA Prof. at ICFO Frank Koppens, in collaboration with the research groups of Prof. Pablo Jarillo-Herrero (MIT), Prof. Marco Polini (University of Pisa), Prof. Efthimios Kaxiras (Harvard), Prof. Dmitri Efetov (ICFO) and NIMS (Japan), have found that twisted bilayer graphene can be used to guide and control light at the nanometer scale. This is possible thanks to the interaction between light and the collective movement of the electrons in the material.

NeoGraf Solutions inaugurates its 750-ton graphene production facility

US-based NeoGraf Solutions, a leading graphite developer and producer, announced that it has started to produce graphene (GNP) materials, branded as Graf-X. The company mainly targets thermoset and thermoset and thermoplastic applications.

NeoGraf Solutions graphene production floor photo

NeoGraf says that it has an annual capacity of over 750 metric tons for its GNP material, and over 1,300 tons of its graphene precursors (GP), which are graphite products design to enable efficient conversion into graphene materials. The company produces its graphene in Lakewood, Ohio.