CrayoNano receives $1,565,000 grant from the Norwegian Research Council

The Norway-based CrayNano, spun-off from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) and specializes in UVC LED packaged chips for disinfection of water, surface and air based on a technology combining graphene and nanostructures, has received a grant of over USD$1,565,000 from the Norwegian Research Council of Norway for a project titled "UV-C LED using nanowires-on-graphene".

"This shows the interest and support of CrayoNano and our disruptive technology. There is a real need for better disinfection solutions, and this grant re-affirms CrayoNano's vision for a sustainable and healthier future for all." said Jo Uthus, CEO of CrayoNano.

Directa Plus announces plan to raise over $9 Million

Directa Plus has announced plans to raise £7 million (around USD$9,445,000) in a share placing to help accelerate the development of its graphene-based products.

“Directa Plus has made consistent progress towards its goal of commercializing its graphene products and processes with a high quality, growing roster of customers,” said Sir Peter Middleton, Directa Plus non-executive chairman. “The fundraising will enable the company to accelerate that progress by providing funds for investment in what the board considers to be exciting opportunities".

Researchers achieve precision sieving of gases through atomic pores in graphene

A team of researchers, led by Professor Sir Andre Geim at The University of Manchester, in collaboration with scientists from Belgium and China, used low-energy electrons to make individual atomic-scale holes in suspended graphene. The holes came in sizes down to about two angstroms, smaller than even the smallest atoms like helium and hydrogen.

Exponentially selective molecular sieving through angstrom pores image

The researchers report that they achieved practically perfect selectivity (better than 99.9%) for such gases as helium or hydrogen with respect to nitrogen, methane or xenon. Also, air molecules (oxygen and nitrogen) pass through the pores easily relative to carbon dioxide, which is >95% captured.

Versarien reports its financial results for H1 2021, is scaling up its production facilities

Versarien announced its interim financial results for the six months ended 30 September, 2021. Revenues were £3.82 million (up 41% from £2.71 million in H1 2020), while reported net loss was reduced to £3.11 million (down from £4.34 million in H1 2020). At the end of the period, Versarien had £3.46 million in cash and equivalents.

Versarien uses graphene-enhanced concrete in a residential setting image

The company is now focused on two main application areas, textiles and concrete - for which it sees excellent opportunities in the near future. Versarien is increasing its production capacity. It has recently acquired graphene manufacturing assets in Spain, which will provide an additional 100 annual ton capacity, it has ordered equipment that will enable it to increase graphene ink production capacity by 12,000 liters per year and it has signed a lease on a new dedicated graphene production facility in Gloucestershire.

Directa Plus set to sign air and water filtration development deal

Directa Plus has reported its plan to sign an agreement with a global chemicals and materials group, to co-develop products targeting the air and water filtration markets. The company remains unnamed, but is said to be “a major player in the non-woven materials industry” that is based in Italy.

The deal is set to run for an initial period of 12 months and will see the two parties collaborate exclusively to develop specific products for the global air and water filtration markets. If the initial collaboration is successful and the technical results are achieved, the two companies will negotiate a technical and commercial partnership agreement.

First Graphene announces milestone on supercapacitor materials

First Graphene (FGR) has announced that it has reached a milestone on its program to develop high performing supercapacitor materials. FGR’s recent work has been focused on the development of an optimized bill of materials for a supercapacitor to deliver high energy and power densities.

First Graphene has now announced that, in a standard test cell, its product PureGRAPH hybrid active materials outperform leading activated carbon materials over 100 cycles. The PureGRAPH materials have a specific capacitance of 140 farads per gram (f/g) while activated carbon cells typically have a specific capacitance of 35 f/g. FGR said this shows that PureGRAPH hybrid active materials can be formulated into an electrode slurry for use in device manufacture.

Roadfill succeeds in raising funds for its graphene-enhanced road repair technology

UK-based Roadfill develops a technology that combines waste plastic with graphene that is used to repair roads, while cutting CO2 emissions and creating a circular economy. According to the company's research, its products reduce bitumen (heated petroleum) usage by up to 14%, and last on average 7X longer, which can cut costs for public bodies and businesses by up to 30%. The products can be more weather and pothole resistant, and give greater surface friction, reducing tyre fatigue and braking distances.

Roadfill graphene-enhanced road repair photo

Roadfill is now raising funds in a successful crowdfunding campaign. The campaigns ends today, and the company already raised over £550,000 from over 600 investors, well over its original £350,000 target. If you are interested, hop over to Seedrs to check the company out - as you can still invest in it today.

Researchers demonstrate how graphene can improve perovskite solar cells

Recent research has shown that the incorporation of graphene-related materials improves the performance and stability of perovskite solar cells. Graphene is hydrophobic, which can enhance several properties of perovskite solar cells. Firstly, it can enhance stability and the passivation of electron traps at the perovskite’s crystalline domain interfaces. Graphene can also provide better energy level alignment, leading to more efficient devices.

Improving Solar Cells with Pristine Graphene on Lead Iodide Films image

In a recent study, Spain-based scientists used pristine graphene to improve the properties of MAPbI3, a popular perovskite material. Pristine graphene was combined with the metal halide perovskite to form the active layer of the solar cells. By analyzing the resulting graphene/perovskite material, it was observed that an average efficiency value of 15% under high-stress conditions was achieved when the optimal amount of graphene was used.