Trials for use of graphene in road resurfacing begin on A1 in Northumberland

National Highways will trial the use of graphene along three miles of the A1’s northbound carriageway between Newton on the Moor and West Cawledge, Northumberland, UK. If successful, using graphene could make roadworks less frequent and make roads smoother and more reliable.

Graphene used to resurface roads in new trial image

National Highways is carrying out the trials with the Graphene Engineering Innovation Centre (GEIC) at The University of Manchester and Pavement Testing Services (PTS).

Read the full story Posted: Sep 09,2021

University of Manchester's GEIC hosts first exterior pour of graphene-enhanced Concrete

The Graphene Engineering Innovation Centre (GEIC) at The University of Manchester was the venue for the latest act of pioneering work in using advanced materials in construction to promote sustainability in the sector.

GEIC hosts first exterior pour of graphene-enhanced Concretene image

Nationwide Engineering, Tier 2 partners of the GEIC, re-laid parking bays on the service road adjacent to the Centre earlier this month, using its graphene-enhanced Concretene product as a ‘living lab’ to test performance in exterior conditions.

Read the full story Posted: Sep 08,2021

Graphene-enhanced concrete: recent developments

Graphene seems like a natural fit for the construction field, due to its potential for creating materials that are lighter and more durable. The potential is huge: concrete and asphalt, steel, various paints and much more.

Focusing on concrete, advantages found by researchers are many. It was found that graphene can increase the resistance and impermeability of the material, lower the number of other materials required so that the result is more environmentally friendly and sustainable material, and give the entire material longer life spans.

Read the full story Posted: Aug 10,2021

3D printed graphene reinforced concrete trials to begin in train station

HS2 London tunnels contractor Skanska Costain Strabag JV (SCS JV) is to pioneer the on-site of 3D printing of graphene-reinforced concrete. The technology, called ‘Printfrastructure’, promises to bring big environmental benefits and cost savings, if deployed more widely.

First proof of concept trials are scheduled to begin in the spring, using 5 tonne computer-operated robots. These will initially be used to build part of the retaining walls for the mainline out of Euston station as well as materials stores on the project.

Read the full story Posted: Aug 03,2021

Versarien lays graphene-enhanced concrete in a residential setting

Versarien has executed the use of its graphene-enhanced concrete - this time in a residential setting. The Company poured its product for a property development company at a site in Symonds Yat. This follows the former announcenemt back in May, when the world's first graphene concrete slab was poured for commercial use at Amesbury's Solstice Park for a gym owned and run by military veterans.

Versarien uses graphene-enhanced concrete in a residential setting image

Neill Ricketts, Versarien CEO, said: "We're laying a relatively small concrete slab at Symonds Yat as a forerunner for some much bigger projects."

Read the full story Posted: Jul 20,2021

Graphene-enhanced cement could help build more durable roads and cities

Northwestern University researchers have added graphene nanoplatelets to cement, resulting in smarter, more durable and highly functional cement.

With cement being the most widely consumed material globally and the cement industry accounting for 8% of human-caused greenhouse gas emissions, civil and environmental engineering professor Ange-Therese Akono turned to nanoreinforced cement to look for a solution. Akono, the lead author on the study and an assistant professor in the McCormick School of Engineering, said nanomaterials reduce the carbon footprint of cement composites, but until now, little was known about its impact on fracture behavior.

Read the full story Posted: Jun 22,2021

Graphene-based concrete used in a commercial setting for the first time

Construction company Nationwide Engineering has reported the laying of the world's first graphene-enhanced concrete slab engineered for sustainability in a commercial setting.

Team from The University of Manchester and Nationwide Engineering laying the world's first graphene concrete imageTeam from The University of Manchester and Nationwide Engineering laying the world's first engineered graphene concrete in a commercial setting. Credit: The University of Manchester/Nationwide Engineering

The venue for this innovation milestone is located a couple of miles east of the ancient monument of Stonehenge - the new Southern Quarter gym in Amesbury's Solstice Park, owned and run by military veterans and due to open in summer 2021. This enterprise has been made possible by a joint venture between Nationwide Engineering and The University of Manchester.

Read the full story Posted: May 26,2021

Concrene announces plans for first graphene reinforced concrete product to hit the market

In July 2020, Thomas Swan signed an exclusive agency agreement with Concrene, for a graphene-enhanced concrete project. Now, Concrene has announced that the first commercial concrete product reinforced with graphene will be available on the US market in April 2021.

The first graphene reinforced concrete product on the market by Concrene image

Fairview Hearthside, a licensee of the innovative nanotechnology, will manufacture a range of Concrene precast fire pits for private homes and professional outdoor venues. The fire pits offer enhanced durability, long outdoor performance and natural concrete finish.

Read the full story Posted: Mar 02,2021

Rice team turns pyrolyzed ash into graphene

Researchers at James Tour's lab at Rice University have developed a new process, able to convert worthless pyrolyzed plastic ash into graphene. The technique produces turbostratic graphene flakes that can be directly added to other substances like films of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) that better resist water in packaging and cement paste and concrete, dramatically increasing their compressive strength.

Converting plastic waste pyrolysis ash into flash graphene image

Similarly to the flash graphene process the Tour lab introduced before, pyrolyzed ash turns into turbostratic graphene. That has weaker attractive interactions between the flakes, making it easier to mix them into solutions.

Read the full story Posted: Jan 12,2021