Graphene to potentially help in the fight against Coronavirus, according to Planartech's CEO

Patrick Franz, the founder and chief executive of materials group PlanarTECH which is currently engaged in an equity crowdfunding campaign to expand its business and enter new markets, sees graphene as a potentially useful tool in the fight against Coronavirus.

Franz says research papers written in China over the last four years identified graphene oxide as a potentially effective anti-viral agent. Though none of the studies targeted the same pathogen responsible for the current Coronavirus outbreak, Frantz says the conclusion is that graphene oxide may offer a platform to fight a variety of viral infections (such as the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus) and possibly in the form of a coating.

Directa Plus' graphene could be used in the production of medical devices like masks, gloves and gowns to fight Coronavirus pandemic

Directa Plus logoAdvanced materials company Directa Plus said its graphene material could be used in medical devices to help authorities combat the Covid-19 pandemic.

The company, whose Italian operations were unaffected by government moves to close down activity not associated with essential goods and services, said its graphene was non-toxic and its bacteriostatic properties could be used in the production of medical devices, such as masks, gloves and gowns to ensure better prevention properties for the spread of the virus.

New face masks use graphene and electrical charge to repel viruses and bacteria

LIGC Applications has developed the Guardian G-Volt, a face mask with a graphene filtration system that can be sterilized and safely re-used.

Graphene could help make face masks that repel bacteria image

Global interest in protective masks has surged in recent months, due to ongoing coronavirus outbreaks around the world. However, the company, which is based in New York, said it had taken five years to design and test the mask. They are now crowdfunding the project online.

Graphene-based stress sensor could help NASA in testing anxiety levels of astronauts

A new graphene-based sensor that measures stress via cortisol in sweat could be used by NASA to gauge the anxiety levels of astronauts.

Graphene-enhanced stress monitor to help NASA image

Developed by Caltech assistant professor of medical engineering, Wei Gao, the device features a plastic sheet etched with a laser to generate a 3D graphene structure with tiny pores in which sweat can collect. Those pores create a large amount of surface area in the sensor, which makes it sensitive enough to detect compounds in the sweat that are only present in very small amounts. Those tiny pores are also coupled with an antibody sensitive to cortisol, allowing the sensor to detect the compound.

CRIL secures €140,000 grant to accelerate development of graphene-based scanning microscope

Cambridge Raman Imaging logo imageCambridge Raman Imaging Limited (CRIL), a Frontier IP Group portfolio firm, has been awarded €140,000 (£116,380) in EU funding to accelerate development of its graphene-enabled scanning microscope.

CRIL, which was spun out from the University of Cambridge and Italian university Politecnico di Milano in 2018, is developing a microscope which uses graphene to modulate ultra-short pulses of light to diagnose and track cancer tumors.

Versarien - Think you know graphene? Think again! Versarien - Think you know graphene? Think again!