Graphene-based platform could selectively identify deadly strains of bacteria

A team led by Boston College researchers has used a sheet of graphene to track the electronic signals inherent in biological structures, in order to develop a platform to selectively identify deadly strains of bacteria. This effort could lead to more accurate targeting of infections with appropriate antibiotics, according to the team.

Graphene helps create a new platform to selectively ID deadly strains of bacteria image

The prototype demonstrates the first selective, rapid, and inexpensive electrical detection of the pathogenic bacterial species Staphylococcus aureus and antibiotic resistant Acinetobacter baumannii on a single platform, said Boston College Professor of Physics Kenneth Burch, a lead co-author of the paper.

Graphene amplifier may tap into the "terahertz gap"

Researchers from Loughborough University have created a unique graphene-based device which may unlock the elusive terahertz wavelengths and make revolutionary new technologies possible.

Graphene amplifier for the terahertz gap imageLight in the THz frequencies hits the ‘sandwich’ and is reflected with additional energy. Credit: Loughborough University

Terahertz waves (THz) are located between microwaves and infrared in the light frequency spectrum, but due to their low energy, scientists have been unable to harness their potential. This issue is known as the "terahertz gap".

Chinese researchers design a silicon-graphene-germanium transistor for future THz operation

Researchers from the Chinese Academy of Sciences have fabricated a graphene-based transistor with a Schottky emitter - a silicon-graphene-germanium transistor. Using a semiconductor membrane and graphene transfer, the team stacked three materials including an n-type top single-crystal Si membrane, a middle single-layer graphene (Gr) and an n-type bottom Ge substrate.

A vertical silicon-graphene-germanium transistor inageDevice design and fabrication. Image credit: Nature Communications

The team explained that compared with previous tunnel emitters, the on-current of the Si-Gr Schottky emitter shows the maximum on-current and the smallest capacitance, leading to a delay time more than 1,000 times shorter. Thus, the alpha cut-off frequency of the transistor is expected to increase from about 1 MHz by using the previous tunnel emitters to above 1 GHz by using the current Schottky emitter. THz operation is expected using a compact model of an ideal device.

Groningen team creates graphene-based 2D spin transistor

Physicists from the University of Groningen constructed a two-dimensional spin transistor, in which spin currents were generated by an electric current through graphene. A monolayer of a transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) was placed on top of the graphene to induce charge-to-spin conversion in the graphene.

Scientists create fully electronic 2-dimensional spin transistors image

Spintronics is an attractive alternative way of creating low-power electronic devices. It is not based on a charge current but rather on a current of electron spins. Spin is a quantum mechanical property of an electron, a magnetic moment that could be used to transfer or store information.

Graphene interconnects to advance high-speed super-computers

In November 2018, researchers from the University of California, Santa Barbara presented a paper on CMOS-compatible graphene interconnects. Following this work, a team of University of California Santa Barbara (UCSB) engineering researchers recently came out with a method to utilize nanometer-scale doped multilayer graphene (DMG) interconnects well suited to the mass-production of integrated circuits.

For more than 20 years interconnects have been manufactured using copper as the base material, yet, the limitations of this metal when shrinking it to the nanoscale resistivity increase, which poses a “fundamental threat to the $500 billion semiconductor industry,” say researchers at UCSB. Graphene holds the potential to resolve this issue as a global desire for smarter, faster, lighter and affordable technology and devices continues to expand.

Versarien - Think you know graphene? Think again! Versarien - Think you know graphene? Think again!