New graphene-enhanced non-liquid lubricant shows promise for various aerospace applications

Researchers at Purdue University have created a new type of graphene-enhanced non-liquid lubricant which reduces friction and wear. The suggested applications include air compressors for missile systems and more. The new liquid-free composite is made from a slurry of graphene, zinc oxide, and the polymer polyvinylidene difluoride.

Graphene-enhanced non-liquid lubricant shows promise image

The nanosize zinc-oxide particles allow the lubricant to stick to the metal surface, and the polymer binds the whole mixture together, said the team, which also explained that solid lubricants are needed for numerous applications such as air compressors, equipment used in the food industry, space vehicles, gear-and-chain mechanisms, fasteners found in high-temperature environments, and missile systems.

Applied Graphehe Materials updates on progress of its graphene work

Applied Graphene Materials, in a recent update, said it made "significant progress" in all of its core markets of composites, coatings, oils and lubricants. Among the reported highlights of its work is its graphene-enhanced epoxy prepreg system MTC9800 to be shown at the JEC World exhibition later this month, after a year and half collaboration with SHD Composites.

In addition, the company has recently completed the first phase of a development project investigating the application of its graphene for resin infused Aerospace structures. During 2016 it continued work on its development program with Airbus Defence and Space, a division of Airbus Group SE, although details of this work are still subject to a non-disclosure agreement.

Nippon Shokubai succeeds in mass production test of GO-based materials

Nippon Shokubai logo imageNippon Shokubai, a Japan-based global materials provider, has announced its success in mass production tests of graphene oxide-based materials. The production volume attained in the mass production test was reportedly improved dozens of times as much as that attained at laboratory, and Nippon Shokubai will start to provide graphene oxide-based materials as samples for application development.

The graphene oxide-based materials are lamellar carbon compounds with the approximately 1nm thickness and the company expects them to be suitable for various functional materials, such as lubricants, water treatment membranes, and catalysts. Nippon Shokubai stated that it has resolved various problems relating to chemical reactions of the production process and succeeded in the mass production test by utilizing its control technology for stable proceeding of chemical reactions in collaboration with Okayama University which retained academic knowledge about reaction mechanism of graphene oxide.

Haydale announces reactor supply and collaboration agreement with Graphit Kropfmuhl , part of AMG Advanced Metallurgical Group

Haydale logoHaydale has announced a collaboration agreement with Graphit Kropfmuhl GmbH, part of AMG Advanced Metallurgical Group and an affiliate of Alterna Capital Partners. The Agreement focuses on the development of new value added nano-material products using Haydale's HDPlas functionalization process and certain AMG graphitic feedstock material primarily from its GK mine in Sri Lanka.

Haydale will initially supply an R&D reactor (HT60) and a larger capacity reactor (HT200) to GK for use under the Agreement. The initial contract value for the supply of the reactors is payable to Haydale on the normal machine supply basis. Subject to reaching the agreed milestones, the majority of the revenue is scheduled to be received in the current financial year and is expected to constitute a significant proportion of the Group’s revenues for the year ended 30 June 2016.

Researchers at Northwestern U use crumpled graphene balls to improve oil's performance

Researchers at Northwestern University targeted the problem of fuel waste in automobiles due to friction, and tested crumpled graphene balls as a lubricant additive. In a series of tests, oil modified with crumpled graphene balls outperformed some commercial lubricants by 15%, both in terms of reducing friction and the degree of wear on steel surfaces.

Crumpled graphene balls are a novel type of ultrafine particles that resemble crumpled paper balls. The particles are made by drying tiny water droplets with graphene-based sheets inside. The scientists explain that capillary force generated by the evaporation of water crumples the sheets into miniaturized paper balls, just like how we might crumple a piece of paper with our hands.

Versarien - Think you know graphene? Think again! Versarien - Think you know graphene? Think again!