Research team examines graphene's effects on the lungs

Researchers from Empa and the Adolphe Merkle Institute (AMI) in Fribourg have conducted studies on a 3D lung model to examine the behavior of graphene and graphene-like materials once they have been inhaled.

AMI lung model imageThe lung model at Adolphe Merkle Institute (AMI)

Thanks to the 3-D lung model, the researchers have succeeded in simulating the actual conditions at the blood-air barrier and the impact of graphene on the lung tissue as realistically as possible – without any tests on animals or humans. It is a cell model representing the lung alveoli. Conventional in vitro tests work with cell cultures from just one cell type – the newly established lung model, on the other hand, bears three different cell types, which simulate the conditions inside the lung, namely alveolar epithelial cells and two kinds of immune cells – macrophages and dendritic cells.

XG Sciences’ recent expansion adds graphene production capacity

XG Sciences logoXG Sciences has announced the completion of the first phase of expansion in its newest 64,000 square-foot facility. The expansion has added 90 metric tons of graphene nanoplatelet production capacity, bringing the total capacity of the facility up to approximately 180 metric tons and enabling the formulation of up to 18 million kilograms of advanced materials per year. Phase two of the expansion is expected to be complete by year-end and will result in up to 400 metric tons of total graphene nanoplatelet output capacity at the facility.

XG's total graphene nanoplatelet output capacity across both of its manufacturing facilities currently exceeds 200 metric tons per year and will more than double over the next three months, reaching up to an approximate 450 metric tons by year-end. The expansions support XG’s mission to continue commercializing the use of graphene in customer products across diverse industries.

Versarien signs deal with Fortune 500 company to explore its GNPs in construction applications

Versarien reports it has signed an agreement with U.S-based firm AECOM, a Fortune 500 company, to explore the potential of its graphene-based Nanene in construction. AECOM is involved in various construction projects from planning new cities and building skyscrapers to "repairing damaged environments."

AECOM "will initially be working on a project involving the incorporation of Versarien's proprietary Nanene few layer graphene nano-platelets into large-scale polymer structures used in civil infrastructure projects, with a view to increasing their structural strength".

Pipes laminated with graphene could reduce corrosion in the oil and gas industry

Researchers at The University of Manchester and TWI have discovered ways of using graphene to prolong the lifetime of pipes used in the oil and gas industry. The team has designed a way of incorporating graphene into a polymer liner used in pipes that transport crude oil and gas from the sea floor. This technology has the potential to extend the life of the underwater pipework and therefore reduce the time between repairs.

Such pipes are generally made of internal layers of polymer or composite and external strengthening steel. Within these pipes, fluids may be at very high pressure and elevated temperature. In situations where carbon dioxide (CO2), hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and water permeate through the protective barrier layer of the pipe, the steel may corrode causing the pipe to lose strength over time, leading to a risk of catastrophic failure.

Versarien - Think you know graphene? Think again! Versarien - Think you know graphene? Think again!