Dotz Nano shows graphene quantum dots to be effective in treating brain injuries, strokes and heart attacks

Dotz Nano has shared a new research that finds its graphene quantum dots (GQDs) technology effective in treating brain injuries, strokes, multiple sclerosis and heart attacks. According to the company, the study demonstrated that these dots, manufactured from coal, can assist in fighting oxidative stress to assist in treating patients suffering from the serious conditions.

Led by the Company's scientific advisor, Professor James Tour, the study was conducted by five universities and research facilities including Rice University, with the findings covered by multiple medical publications.

Read the full story Posted: Jul 02,2019

Rice team creates laser-induced graphene nanogenerators that turn movement into energy

Rice University researchers have recently taken the idea of wearable devices that harvest energy from movement to a new level. Prof. James Tour's lab has adapted laser-induced graphene (LIG) into small, metal-free devices that generate electricity.

Putting the LIG composites in contact with other surfaces produces static electricity that can be used to power devices. This relies on the triboelectric effect, by which materials gather a charge through contact. When they are put together and then pulled apart, surface charges build up that can be channeled toward power generation.

Read the full story Posted: May 31,2019

Graphene quantum dots could yield an effective antioxidant for various traumatic injuries

Researchers from Rice University, the Texas A&M Health Science Center and the McGovern Medical School at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) have found that graphene quantum dots drawn from common coal may be the basis for an effective antioxidant for people who suffer traumatic brain injuries, strokes or heart attacks.

Graphene quantum dots could yield an effective antioxidant for various traumatic injuries imageCoal-derived graphene quantum dots as seen under an electron microscope

The QDs' ability to quench oxidative stress after such injuries was the subject of a study, which showed that the biocompatible dots, when modified with a common polymer, are effective mimics of the body’s own superoxide dismutase, one of many natural enzymes that keep oxidative stress in check.

Read the full story Posted: Apr 28,2019

Graphene-based foam maintains texture at extreme temperatures

Researchers from Nankai University in China and Rice University in the U.S. have developed a type of graphene-based foam that retains its texture when exposed to extremely cold temperatures.

Graphene foam maintains texture at extreme temperatures imageStructure of the 3D graphene foam

The researchers note that almost all materials become more brittle and stiffer when exposed to very cold temperatures, often leading to loss of strength. In this new work, the researchers sought to find a material that would spring back after being crushed while exposed to extreme temperatures. To that end, they turned to graphene as a possible solution.

Read the full story Posted: Apr 19,2019

Rice and BGU present a range of exciting new graphene-enhanced composite materials

The labs of Rice University chemist James Tour and Christopher Arnusch, a professor at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev in Israel, introduced a batch of graphene-enhanced composites that can be a step towards more robust packages.

Rice and BGU present a range of exciting new graphene-enhanced composite materials

By infusing laser-induced graphene with plastic, rubber, cement, wax or other materials, the lab made composites with a wide range of possible applications. These new composites could be used in wearable electronics, in heat therapy, in water treatment, in anti-icing and deicing work, in creating antimicrobial surfaces and even in making resistive random-access memory devices.

Read the full story Posted: Feb 13,2019

Graphene/hBN ceramic could act as a sensor for structures and aircraft

Rice University and Iran University of Science and Technology researchers have found a unique ceramic material that could act as a sensor for structures.

Graphene/hBN ceramic could act as a sensor for structures and aircraft image

The ceramic becomes more electrically conductive under elastic strain and less conductive under plastic strain, and could lead to a new generation of sensors embedded into structures like buildings, bridges and aircraft able to monitor their own health.

Read the full story Posted: Feb 06,2019

Rice team gives epoxy a graphene boost

Rice University scientists have developed a graphene-based epoxy for electronic applications. Epoxy combined with graphene foam invented in the Rice lab of Prof. James Tour) is reportedly substantially tougher than pure epoxy and far more conductive than other epoxy composites, while retaining the material's low density. It could improve upon epoxies in current use that weaken the material's structure with the addition of conductive fillers.

Rice team gives epoxy a graphene boost image

By itself, epoxy is an insulator, and is commonly used in coatings, adhesives, electronics, industrial tooling and structural composites. Metal or carbon fillers are often added for applications where conductivity is desired, like electromagnetic shielding. The trade-off, however, is that more filler brings better conductivity at the cost of weight and compressive strength, and the composite becomes harder to process. The Rice solution replaces metal or carbon powders with a 3D foam made of nanoscale sheets of graphene.

Read the full story Posted: Nov 15,2018

Rice University team creates 3D objects from graphene foam

Rice University scientists have developed a simple way to create conductive, 3D objects made of graphene foam. The resulting objects may offer new possibilities for energy storage and flexible electronic sensor applications, according to Rice chemist Prof. James Tour.

Rice team creates 3D objects from graphene foam image

The technique is an extension of groundbreaking work by the Tour lab that produced the first laser-induced graphene (LIG) in 2014 by heating inexpensive polyimide plastic sheets with a laser. The laser burns halfway through the plastic and turns the top into graphene that remains attached to the bottom half. LIG can be made in macroscale patterns at room temperature.

Read the full story Posted: Jun 18,2018

Rice team created graphene pellets using a simple, scalable process

Researchers at Rice University have demonstrated the mechano-chemical assembly of functionalized graphene layers into 3D graphitic solids (graphite pellets) via room temperature and low energy consuming processing. The pellet material is reportedly stronger and lighter than commercial graphite electrodes and could be promising for electrical storage applications with high energy and power densities.

Rice graphene pellets process image

The environmentally friendly, scalable process can be done in minutes by hand by grinding chemically modified graphene into a powder and using a hand-powered press to squeeze the powder into a solid pellet. The team demonstrated how to make a battery-sized pellet, but the graphene powders with chemical functionalities attached to it can be pressed into any form. They said the material could be suitable for structural, catalytic, electrochemical and electronic applications.

Read the full story Posted: Mar 28,2018

Rice University team detects metal in ‘metal-free’ graphene catalysts

Rice University scientists, led by Prof. James Tour, along with teams from the University of Texas at San Antonio and the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China have detected a deception in graphene catalysts that, until now, gone unnoticed. Graphene has been widely tested as a replacement for expensive platinum in applications like fuel cells, where the material catalyzes the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) essential to turn chemical energy into electrical energy.

Rice team finds  manganese atoms in graphene catalysts image

Since graphene isn't naturally metallic, researchers have been baffled by its catalytic activity when used as a cathode. The Rice team has now discovered that trace quantities of manganese contamination from graphite precursors or reactants hide in the graphene lattice. Under the right conditions, those metal bits activate the ORR. Tour said they also provide insight into how ultrathin catalysts like graphene can be improved.

Read the full story Posted: Feb 27,2018