Chinese scientists design a flexible graphene-based energy storage membrane

Jul 19, 2017

Researchers from Tsinghua University in China have designed a low-cost energy storage device using a TiO2-assisted UV reduction of sandwiched graphene components. The sandwich structure consists of two active layers of reduced graphene oxide hybridized with TiO2, with a graphene oxide separator (rGO-TiO2/rGO/rGO-TiO2). In the device, the separator layer also acts as a reservoir for the electrolyte, which affects ion diffusion—a known problem for layered membrane devices—and affects both the capacity and rate performance.

Graphene flexible supercapacitor membrane process image

The team explained that a step-by-step vacuum filtration process is used to form the membrane structure, and the amount of graphene oxide used in the filtration solutions can be adjusted to precisely tune the thickness of each layer. Irradiation of the dried membrane with UV light then reduces the graphene oxide to rGO with assistance from the TiO2.

South Korean researchers develop a graphene device controlled by static electricity

Jul 18, 2017

A research team from the South Korean Sungkyunkwan University has developed a technology that can control graphene electronic device through static electricity. The team has developed a gate that utilizes the graphene electrostatic phenomenon; Static electricity that occurs from friction is trapped inside of a lower board and serves as a gate. Unlike current materials, formation, modification, and elimination are said to be possible with this technology.

The team aims to make the process that forms a gate which will control current from an electronic device unnecessary. As a result, integration with high density should be possible and it is expected that this technology will reduce cost and time to manufacture electronic devices.

Researchers in India develop a graphene-silver-pyyrole composite for supercapacitors

Jul 16, 2017

Researchers at the India Institute of Technology, Kharagpur, have developed a new graphene, silver and pyyrole nanocomposite material suitable for making supercapacitors.

The nanomaterial was made of a graphene sheet onto which silver nanoparticles, each about 15-20 nanometers wide, had been embedded uniformly. The material was shown to have a high specific capacitance of 472 farad per gram at a current density of 0.5 amperes per gram. It could retain 95% of its capacitance after 1,000 consecutive charge-discharge cycles.

Graphene/cellulose nanofiber hybrid sensor to efficiently detect alcohol

Jul 14, 2017

An international group of researchers from Saudi Arabia, China and the US have developed a graphene-bacterial cellulose nanofiber (GC/BCN) hybrid sensor to detect alcohol (ethanol) with great efficiency. The sensor was described as flexible, transparent, highly sensitive and with an excellent alcohol recognition performance. Electrical tests in different liquid environments were performed, with remarkable results.

The researchers created a composite thin film composed of graphene and bacterial cellulose nanofibers. In this material, the bacterial cellulose nanofibres act as the host and the graphene as the filler material. Due to its excellent conductive properties, it was reported that graphene does not require the addition of a conductive filler material, unlike many composites. The Researchers constructed the composite using a combination of wet chemical, blending, sonication (Cole-Parmer), centrifugal (Centrifuge 5810, Eppendorf), dialysis and sputtering (Equipment Support Co) methods.

A Graphene-MoS2 combination could assist in efficient splitting of water to create 'green' energy

Jul 10, 2017

Researchers from Florida State University, Penn State University, Tsinghua University in China and the Institute of Carbon Science and Technology in Japan have come to fascinating conclusions on how to produce pure hydrogen, a green energy fuel by splitting water.

Graphene-MoS2 combo to split water image

After experimenting with ways to use the compound molybdenum disulfide to split water, the team realized that the compound’s protons did not overlap well with that of hydrogen. They ultimately determined that the best way to split the hydrogen was to create an alloy with the molybdenum disulfide. They created a thin film with alternating graphene and tungsten-molybdenum layers.

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