Cryorig launches graphene-enhanced cooling system for PCs

PC gear company Cryorig has introduced its low-profile CPU graphene-enhanced cooling system for small form-factor PCs that can dissipate up to 125 W. The Cryorig C7 G is among the smallest coolers for higher-end processors available today. To make C7 G's high performance possible, Cryorig applied graphene coating on the heatsink.

Graphene-based cooler fr CPUs available by Cryorig image

As demands arise for higher-performance components, cooling designers are creating low-profile coolers rated for TDP levels of 95 W of higher. To maximize efficiency of such devices, manufacturers use copper for heatsinks, many heat pipes, and large fans. Cryorig decided to go one step further and applied graphene coating to the radiator’s fins. Thermal conductivity of graphene is considerably higher than thermal conductivity of aluminum or copper, so applying it on the fins could theoretically improve cooling performance.

Graphene 'supercondensers' store electric charge in textile materials

Researchers at Valencia's Polytechnic University (UPV) have developed new devices that store electric charge in textile materials, which could be used to, for example, charge mobile phones. These are supercondensers placed on active carbon tissues that stand out due to their electric properties and high level of power.

The study focused on using textile materials as electrodes. In this case, the devices that were designed and tested make use of active carbon, graphene and polyaniline, a polymer with high capabilities that is already broadly used in textile materials.

Graphene enables fast and sensitive room-temperature nanomechanical bolometer

Scientists at the University of Oregon have designed a new method of measuring light—with the help of microscopic drums to hear light. The technology, known as a “graphene nanomechanical bolometer,” detects almost every color of light at high temperatures and high speeds.

A fast and sensitive room-temperature graphene nanomechanical bolometer image

“This tool is the fastest and most sensitive in its class,” said Benjamín Alemán, a professor of physics and a member of the University of Oregon’s Center for Optical, Molecular, and Quantum Science and an associate of the Phil and Penny Knight Campus for Accelerating Scientific Impact.

Australian team designs a graphene filter to purify methane from biogas

University of New South Wales (UNSW) scientists, led by Dr Rakesh Joshi of the UNSW School of Materials Science and Engineering, have demonstrated that graphene membranes can be used to purify methane that is present in biogas generated during the breakdown of materials in wastewater plants.

The research indicates that it is possible to purify methane from biogas in a wastewater treatment plant environment, creating a potential source of renewable energy. Biogas, a mixture of methane and other impurities, is produced during anaerobic digestion in wastewater treatment – the process of bacteria seperating biodegradable material.

Graphene sensors to detect morphine in urine

A research team led by Graphene Flagship partners Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (CNR), Italy, and Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, together with a team at the University of Modena, Italy, has created a new qualitative graphene-based sensor for morphine, that could be used by police to detect opiate abuse using suspects' urine samples.

Morphine is the main metabolite of heroin. The new sensor provides a fast-acting 'rough test' that yields a positive response if morphine concentration in urine exceeds a certain threshold. The sensor could be used by police forces during criminal investigations and roadside stops, in a similar way to how breathalyzers are used to test alcohol levels in suspected drunk drivers.

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