"Graphene window" enables precise 3D imaging of nanoparticles

Researchers at Berkeley Lab, in collaboration with the Institute for Basic Science (IBS) in South Korea, Monash University in Australia, and UC Berkeley, have developed a technique that produces atomic-scale 3D images of nanoparticles tumbling in liquid between sheets of graphene.

“This is an exciting result. We can now measure atomic positions in three dimensions down to a precision six times smaller than hydrogen, the smallest atom,” said study co-author Peter Ercius, a staff scientist at Berkeley Lab’s Molecular Foundry.

Lasers enable graphene-on-kevlar textiles for smart protective clothing

Researchers at Tsinghua University have used lasers to make graphene on Kevlar textiles, creating protective clothing that can record the wearer’s electrocardiogram (ECG) or sense a toxic gas.

Lasers make graphene on kevlar textiles imagePrototype of an intelligent protective vest based on the Kevlar-laser induced graphene textile (left) with a gas sensor and battery embedded in a design on the vest (top right) also shown in false color (bottom right). Credit: ACS Nano

Yingying Zhang and colleagues at Tsinghua University used a carbon dioxide laser to write on Kevlar, a synthetic polyamide fiber generally used to make body armor and personal protective clothing. The laser burned and depolymerized the Kevlar fibers and the carbon atoms recombined to form graphene, as shown by Raman spectroscopy. Using a motorized setup for the laser, they were able to scribe any design on the textile in minutes.

Huawei continues the use of graphene cooling films in its new P40 series

Huawei has launched its Huawei P40 flagship phone family, that includes three different devices: the Huawei P40, Huawei P40 Pro and, a new addition to the line-up for 2020, the Huawei P40 Pro Plus.

Huawei launches P40 image

After many rumors about this line sporting a graphene battery - which were later disproved - it appears that Huawei's new P40 phones are using a graphene film cooling technology for heat management purposes (Huawei's SuperCool system), much like the Mate 20X and P30 line that preceded the P40.

Crumpled graphene could enable fast, simple and sensitive biosensors

Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have found that crumpling graphene makes it more than ten thousand times more sensitive to DNA by creating electrical "hot spots". This discovery could assist in addressing a known issue of graphene-based biosensors - the face that they require a lot of DNA in order to function properly.

"This sensor can detect ultra-low concentrations of molecules that are markers of disease, which is important for early diagnosis," said study leader Rashid Bashir, a professor of bioengineering and the dean of the Grainger College of Engineering at Illinois. "It's very sensitive, it's low-cost, it's easy to use, and it's using graphene in a new way."

A new graphene-carbon nanotubes hybrid catalyst could help clean energy revolution

Researchers at Aalto University, collaborating with researchers at CNRS France, have developed a graphene-carbon nanotube catalyst which gives better control over important chemical reactions for producing green technology and clean energy.

The oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and oxygen evolution reaction (OER) are the most important electrochemical reactions that limit the efficiencies of hydrogen fuel cells (for powering vehicles and power generation), water electrolyzers (for clean hydrogen production), and high-capacity metal-air batteries. The team has developed a new catalyst that reportedly drives these reactions more efficiently than other bifunctional catalysts currently available. The researchers also found that the electrocatalytic activity of their new catalyst can be significantly altered depending on choice of the material on which the catalyst was deposited.

Versarien - Think you know graphene? Think again! Versarien - Think you know graphene? Think again!