Soft graphene-based probe monitors brain and gut chemistry

Scientists from Michigan State University and Stanford University have invented the “NeuroString” — a graphene-based implantable probe that enables researchers to study the chemistry of brain and gut health.

Graphene implant monitors brain and gut chemistry imageThree flexible NeuroString sensors. Credit: Courtesy of Jinxing Li

“The mainstream way people are trying to understand the brain is to read and record electric signals,” said Jinxing Li, the paper’s first author and an assistant professor in MSU’s College of Engineering. “But chemical signals play just as significant a role in brain communication, and they are also directly related to diseases. My lab at MSU focuses on developing cutting-edge neuroprobes and microrobotics.”

On SP Nano’s cutting-edge graphene and CNT dispersion technology

This is a sponsored post by SP Nano

Israel-based SP Nano developed a unique dispersion technology based on a genetically engineered exceptionally stable protein that is highly suitable for carbon nanoparticles (CNPs) dispersion, including graphene, CNTs and carbon black.

Following years of intensive R&D, SP Nano is now offering its dispersions to application developers. This is the first time that carbon nanomaterials can “truly” be dispersed and achieve cutting-edge performance across a wide range of applications.

SP Nano’s dispersions are now being applied to a wide range of applications, such as

  • Coatings (textiles, surfaces, powders, etc.)
  • Dispersions in matrices (resins, polymers, etc.)
  • Liquid formulations (coolants, inks, slurries, etc.)

A graphene-based catalytic condenser makes abundant materials act like precious metals

A team of researchers from the University of Minnesota Twin Cities, the University of Massachusetts Amherst and University of California, Santa Barbara have invented a graphene-based device that electronically converts one metal into behaving like another to use as a catalyst for speeding chemical reactions.

The fabricated device, called a “catalytic condenser,” is the first to demonstrate that alternative materials that are electronically modified to provide new properties can yield faster, more efficient chemical processing.

Researchers develop method to measure the migration of carbon atoms on the surface of graphene

Researchers at the University of Vienna have measured the migration of carbon atoms on the surface of graphene for the first time. Although the atoms move too quickly to be directly observed with an electron microscope, their effect on the stability of the material can now be determined indirectly while the material is heated on a microscopic hot plate.

Graphene has been the subject of intensive research for years, but it has not been possible to measure some fundamental processes, including the motion of carbon atoms on its surface. This random migration is the atomic origin of the phenomenon of diffusion - the natural motion of particles such as atoms or molecules in gases, liquids or solids. In the atmosphere and the oceans, this phenomenon ensures an even distribution of oxygen and salt. In the technical industries, it is of central importance for steel production, lithium-ion batteries, and fuel cells, to name a few examples. In materials science, diffusion at the surface of solids explains how certain catalytic reactions proceed and many crystalline materials including graphene are grown.

Researchers develop graphene-enhanced strain-perception-strengthening enabled biomimetic soft skin

Researchers at the Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering (NIMTE) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), led by Prof. CHEN Tao, have designed strain-perception-strengthening (SPS) enabled biomimetic soft skin, which realizes the dynamic transformation from tactile to pain perception.

The synthetic skin is said to be elastic, conductive, and adaptive. It is composed of elastomeric thin-film and assembled graphene nanosheets with an interlocked structural interface.