'Magic angle' trilayer graphene found to act as rare "spin-triplet" superconductor

Researchers at MIT and Harvard University have previously found that graphene can have exotic properties when situated at a 'magic angle'. Now, a new study by some of the members of the same team shows that this material could also be a "spin-triplet" superconductor – one that isn't affected by high magnetic fields – which potentially makes it even more useful.

"The value of this experiment is what it teaches us about fundamental superconductivity, about how materials can behave, so that with those lessons learned, we can try to design principles for other materials which would be easier to manufacture, that could perhaps give you better superconductivity," says physicist Pablo Jarillo-Herrero, from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

New model describes geometric features of carbon networks and their influence on the material's properties

Scientists at Tohoku University and colleagues in Japan have developed a mathematical model that abstracts the key effects of changes to the geometries of carbon material and predicts its unique properties.

Geometric model of 3D curved graphene with chemical dopants image

Scientists generally use mathematical models to predict the properties that might emerge when a material is changed in certain ways. Changing the geometry of three-dimensional (3D) graphene, which is made of networks of carbon atoms, by adding chemicals or introducing topological defects, can improve its catalytic properties, for example. But it has been difficult for scientists to understand why this happens exactly.

GMG announces in-house battery pilot plant investment

Graphene Manufacturing Group (GMG) has announced that it is procuring equipment for a pilot production and testing plant for the manufacture of its Graphene Aluminum-Ion Batteries.

Following recently published performance results and encouraging customer feedback, production of a commercial prototype coin cell battery is targeted before the end of 2021. This pilot production and testing plant is an important next step in the Company’s battery technology development plan.

Researchers use twisted graphene multilayers to unlock radiation-free quantum technology

Rare-earth compounds have attracted researchers for decades thanks to the unique quantum properties they display, which have so far remained out of reach of everyday compounds. One of the most remarkable and exotic properties of those materials is the emergence of exotic superconducting states, and particularly the superconducting states required to build future topological quantum computers. While these specific rare-earth compounds, known as heavy fermion superconductors, have been known for decades, making usable quantum technologies out of them has remained a challenge because they contain critically radioactive compounds, such as uranium and plutonium, rendering them of limited use in real-world quantum technologies.

In a recent study, researchers from Aalto University and Paul Scherrer Institute have found a way to achieve 'heavy fermions' in subtly modified graphene - a cheaper and safer alternative to the rare-earth compounds in which it was possible until now. The researchers showed in their paper how the quantum state known as a “heavy fermion” can be produced by combining three twisted graphene layers. A heavy fermion is a particle – in this case an electron – that behaves like it has a lot more mass than it actually does. The reason it behaves this way stems from unique quantum many-body effects that were mostly only observed in rare-earth compounds until now. This heavy fermion behavior is known to be the driving force of the phenomena required to use these materials for topological quantum computing. This new result demonstrates a new, non-radioactive way of achieving this effect using only carbon, opening up a pathway for sustainably exploiting heavy fermion physics in quantum technologies.

Researchers develop a new method for quick and efficient synthesis of nanographenes

A research team at Nagoya University in Japan has developed a new technique for synthesizing nanographenes, remarkable materials with a vast number of potential structures that can even exhibit electric and magnetic characteristics beyond those of graphene.

Since each nanographene exhibits different physical characteristics, the key to applied nanographene study is to determine the relationship between the structure and characteristics of as many nanographenes as possible.