Researchers develop simple approach for creating quantum materials

University of Pennsylvania scientists have recently conducted a study that shows how patterned, periodic deformations of a single layer of graphene transforms it into a material with electronic properties previously seen in twisted graphene bilayers. This system also hosts additional unexpected and interesting conducting states at the boundary.

Through a better understanding of how unique properties occur when single sheets of graphene are subjected to periodic strain, this work has the potential to create quantum devices such as orbital magnets and superconductors in the future.

Two-Universe model inspired by bi-layer graphene

Researchers from the University of Maryland have explored the somewhat creative possibility that our reality is only one half of a pair of interacting worlds, drawing inspiration from bi-layer graphene. Their mathematical model may provide a new perspective for looking at fundamental features of reality—including why our universe expands the way it does and how that relates to the most miniscule lengths allowed in quantum mechanics.

The scientists formed this new perspective based on the study of bi-layer graphene. They realized that experiments on the electrical properties of stacked sheets of graphene produced results that looked like little universes and that the underlying phenomenon might generalize to other areas of physics. In stacks of graphene, new electrical behaviors arise from interactions between the individual sheets, so perhaps unique physics could similarly emerge from interacting layers elsewhere—perhaps in cosmological theories about the entire universe.

Japan launches a $8.5 million project to study 2.5D materials

Japan's Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology has launched a collaborative project to develop 2.5D materials. The project, titled "Science of 2.5 Dimensional Materials: Paradigm Shift of Materials Science Toward Future Social Innovation" includes 40 researchers in Japan, led by Prof. Ago Hiroki at Kyushu University.

2.5D material chart, Kyushu University

2.5D materials are made by stacking different 2D materials artificially by using advanced transfer techniques. These new materials are not limited by lattice constant or composition, and it is possible to control the material layers, and their stacking angle. These new materials could unlock new breakthroughs in materials science.

Researchers propose new strategy to boost pseudocapacitive performance of micro-supercapacitors

A joint research team, led by Prof. WU Zhongshuai and Prof. FU Qiang from the Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics (DICP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), recently proposed a strategy for boosting the capacitance of graphene-based planar micro-supercapacitors (MSCs) using highly concentrated water-in-salt ambipolar redox electrolyte (ZnI2 + ZnCl2).

Using redox-active electrolytes to boost graphene electrodes is a highly-efficient strategy to increase the capacitive performance of MSCs. However, previously reported redox mediators could only offer a certain capacitance for a single electrode, leading to limited energy density due to the unmatched capacitances of two electrodes.

Researchers succeed in synthesizing single layers of hexagonal boron nitride on graphene

A research team led by the University of Michigan has developed a reliable, scalable method for growing single layers of hexagonal boron nitride on graphene.

Graphene-hBN structures can power LEDs that generate deep-UV light, which is impossible in today's LEDs, said Zetian Mi, U-M professor of electrical engineering and computer science and a corresponding author of the study. Deep-UV LEDs could drive smaller size and greater efficiency in a variety of devices including lasers and air purifiers.