U.S researchers design new graphene-based printed sensors to monitor food safety

Researchers at Iowa State University and Northwestern University have developed graphene sensors that are printed with high-resolution aerosol jet printers on a flexible polymer film and tuned to test for histamine, an allergen and indicator of spoiled fish and meat.

Researchers are using aerosol-jet-printing technology to create graphene biosensors that can detect histamine imageImage courtesy of Jonathan Claussen, taken from Iowa State University's website

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has set histamine guidelines of 50 parts per million in fish, while the sensors were found to detect histamine down to 3.41 parts per million. This validates that the sensors are more than sensitive enough to track food freshness and safety.

Graphene-enhanced asphalt to be tested in Dartford, UK

Highways contractor Amey and its client Kent County Council will be testing Gipave, an Italian graphene-based asphalt supermodifier said to extend pavement life.

The trial is taking place as part of the Association of Directors of Environment, Economy, Planning & Transport (ADEPT) Smart Places Live Labs programme funded by the Department for Transport of the UK.

VFD technology enables next-gen bacteria detection using graphene oxide

Collaborative research between Flinders University's Institute for NanoScale Science and Technology and the Centre for Health Technologies at the University of Technology Sydney has used VFD technology to enable the preparation of a new generation of aggregation-induced emission dye (AIE) luminogens using graphene oxide (GO).

Traditional fluorescent dyes to examine bacteria viability are toxic and suffer poor photostability, so researchers are constantly looking for alternatives. Using the VFD to produce GO/AIE probes with the property of high fluorescence is said to be very promising—with the new GO/AIE nanoprobe having 1400% brighter fluorescent performance than AIE luminogen alone.

Brown researchers combine a ceramic material with graphene to create the toughest solid electrolyte built to date

A team of Brown University researchers has found a way to double the toughness of a ceramic material used to make solid-state lithium ion batteries. The new strategy could be useful in bringing solid-state batteries to the mass market.

Graphene (rGO) can help prevent the propagation of cracks in ceramic materials used for battery electrolytes image

“There’s huge interest in replacing the liquid electrolytes in current batteries with ceramic materials because they’re safer and can provide higher energy density,” said Christos Athanasiou, a postdoctoral researcher in Brown’s School of Engineering and lead author of the research. “So far, research on solid electrolytes has focused on optimizing their chemical properties. With this work, we’re focusing on the mechanical properties, in the hope of making them safer and more practical for widespread use.”

2D Fab to commercialize graphene battery anode following successful funding round

2D Fab AB logoSweden-based 2D fab has recently closed a new share issue of approximately €700,000. The capital will primarily be used for developing the organization and for commercializing the Company's graphene products.

The share issue was directed to a limited number of investors, having received the offer either via the company's executive management or via G&W Fondkommission. Through this transaction 2D fab received eleven new owners, among them Malmö based Polynom Investment.