Graphene shows promise for high-speed optical communications

Researchers affiliated with the Graphene Flagship have demonstrated novel high-speed graphene-based data communication at a data rate of 50 Gb/s. Integrating graphene sheets into silicon photonics could form the basis for next-generation data communications.

Graphene's spectacular performance in high-speed optical communications image

The project was a collaboration between Flagship partners AMO GmbH (Germany), the National Inter-University Consortium for Telecommunications (CNIT) (Italy), Ericsson (Sweden), Ghent University (Belgium), the Institute of Photonic Sciences (ICFO) (Spain), imec (Belgium), Nokia (Germany and Italy), the Vienna University of Technology (TU Wien) (Austria) and the University of Cambridge (UK).

Graphene-based sensors show great potential for environmental monitoring of NO2

Researchers at NPL, University of Surrey, University of London, Chalmers University and Linköping University have demonstrated proof-of-concept graphene-based sensors for environmental monitoring of ultra-low concentration NO2 in complex environments.

Graphene NO2 sensors image

The team reports that robust detection in a wide range of NO2 concentrations, 10-154 ppb, was achieved, highlighting the great potential for graphene-based NO2 sensors, with applications in environmental pollution monitoring, portable monitors, automotive and mobile sensors for a global real-time monitoring network.

Talga reports positive initial test results on its graphene silicon lithium-ion anode

Australian advanced materials technology company, Talga Resources, recently announced positive initial test results from the development of its graphene silicon lithium-ion anode in the UK.

The results are the first under Talga’s UK Government-funded “Safevolt” project - a Talga-led program run in conjunction with consortia partners, Johnson Matthey, the University of Cambridge and manufacturing research group, TWI.

Graphene Flagship partners design graphene-based phase modulators for faster mobile technology

Graphene Flagship Partners at the National Inter-University Consortium for Telecommunications (CNIT) in Italy, IMEC in Belgium and University of Cambridge in UK have designed and tested a graphene-based phase modulator that reportedly outperforms existing silicon-based ones.

Modern optical data and telecommunications employ phase modulators to increase the amount of data relayed and data rate efficiency, i.e. the speed at which information is relayed. Phase modulators traditionally work by grouping several bits of information into fewer symbols, or packets, reducing the overall size, or spectral width. The smaller the spectral width, the higher the data rate efficiency. However, this efficiency is reaching a maximum with silicon based devices, and so a novel solution is needed to bridge the gap between the increase in demand for data and the efficiency in transmitting it.

Versarien provides updates on several energy storage R&D fronts

Versarien LogoVersarien, the advanced materials engineering group, has provided an update on its activities in relation to graphene-enhanced power storage devices like batteries and supercapacitors. The primary goal of incorporating graphene into these devices, Versarien says, is to significantly increase power storage capacity and reduce charging times.

Versarien has been working with WMG (Warwick Manufacturing Group) and their partner companies and scientists at the universities of Warwick and Cambridge to collaborate on the production of power storage devices such as batteries and supercapacitors using Versarien's proprietary Nanene graphene nano platelets. Significant advances have been made through incorporating the Company's high quality graphene into these devices and the Company looks forward to commercial products becoming available in due course.

XFNANO: Graphene and graphene-like materials since 2009 XFNANO: Graphene and graphene-like materials since 2009