Researchers control the relaxation time of graphene

Researchers from CNR-IFN, Politecnico di Milano, the University of Pisa, the Graphene Center of Cambridge (UK) and ICN2 of Barcelona (Spain) have shown that the relaxation time of graphene charge carriers can be significantly modified by applying an external electrical field.

Graphene is able to efficiently absorb light from the visible to the infrared through the photoexcitation of its charge carriers. After light absorption, its photoexcited charge carriers cool down to the initial equilibrium state in a few picoseconds, corresponding to a millionth of a millionth of a second. The remarkable speed of this relaxation process makes graphene particularly promising for a number of technological applications, including light detectors, sources and modulators.

Researchers demonstrate control of the optical properties of graphene

An international team of scientists from the CNR-IFN, Politecnico di Milano, the University of Pisa, the Graphene Center of Cambridge (UK) and the Catalan Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology (ICN2, Barcelona) has shown that the relaxation time of graphene charge carriers can be significantly modified by applying an external electrical field.

After light absorption, graphene's photoexcited charge carriers cool down to the initial equilibrium state in a few picoseconds, corresponding to a millionth of a millionth of a second. The remarkable speed of this relaxation process makes graphene particularly promising for a number of technological applications, including light detectors, sources and modulators.

Versarien to provide graphene-enhanced elastomers to Flux Footwear

Versarien has announced a collaboration with US-based Flux Footwear to supply graphene-enhanced elastomers for an improved model of Flux’s ‘Adapt’ shoe. The elastomers are to be used in an improved model of flux's 'Adapt' model.

The elastomer technology has been developed by Versarien’s in-house technology teams at the University of Manchester and University of Cambridge as part of the GSCALE project and has the potential for multiple elastomer applications.

Cambridge Raman Imaging selected to coordinate a European Union grant to transform cancer diagnosis and treatment

Cambridge Raman Imaging (CRI) has announced it was selected to coordinate a project that received a €3.3 million grant in the European Innovation Council’s (EIC) Transition call.

The project, called CHARM, aims to develop a medical device based on high-speed, low-cost Raman digital imaging technology and artificial intelligence to transform cancer diagnosis and treatment. The technology will analyze the molecular composition of patient tissue samples to distinguish cancerous from healthy cells without the need for chemical staining.

New project aims to utilize graphene and other technologies to improve roads

As part of a £8.6 million research project, announced in support of the government’s UK Innovation Strategy, University of Cambridge engineers will explore how Digital Twins, smart materials, data science and robotic monitoring can work together to develop a connected physical and digital road infrastructure system.

This project is one of eight Prosperity Partnerships being supported with an investment of almost £60 million by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC), part of UK Research and Innovation (UKRI), businesses and universities.