Researchers design graphene nanocomposite temperature alarm sensor

Researchers from The University of Manchester and Hubei University have integrated the electrical conductivity of graphene and the insulation of nitrocellulose to prepare a fire alarm sensor.

Researchers design graphene/nitrocellulose composite alarm image

The graphene/nitrocellulose membrane remains electrically insulated in normal condition, but instantly turns conductive at high temperatures: Upon encountering flames, nitrocellulose decomposes rapidly as a reaction to the high temperature and induces a distinct transition in its electrical resistance, causing the transformation process of the alarm sensor from being electrically insulated to an electron conductive state.

Read the full story Posted: Apr 14,2022

Versarien to provide graphene-enhanced elastomers to Flux Footwear

Versarien has announced a collaboration with US-based Flux Footwear to supply graphene-enhanced elastomers for an improved model of Flux’s ‘Adapt’ shoe. The elastomers are to be used in an improved model of flux's 'Adapt' model.

The elastomer technology has been developed by Versarien’s in-house technology teams at the University of Manchester and University of Cambridge as part of the GSCALE project and has the potential for multiple elastomer applications.

Read the full story Posted: Feb 22,2022

First Graphene and partners secure UK grant to develop graphene-enhanced cement

First Graphene-led consortium of partners has been awarded a UK Government grant to develop high performance graphene-enhanced cement.

The grant of A$360,206 (around USD$258,500) was awarded by the UK Government’s innovation agency, Innovate UK to the consortium, which includes construction materials group Breedon Cement Ltd, construction and regeneration group Morgan Sindall Construction & Infrastructure Ltd, and the University of Manchester’s Department of Mechanical, Civil and Aerospace Engineering.

Read the full story Posted: Feb 19,2022

Graphene assists in observing the elusive Schwinger effect

Researchers at The University of Manchester, MIT and other international collaborators have succeeded in observing the so-called Schwinger effect, an elusive process that normally occurs only in cosmic events. By applying high currents through specially designed graphene-based devices, the team - based at the National Graphene Institute - succeeded in producing particle-antiparticle pairs from a vacuum.

A vacuum is assumed to be completely empty space, without any matter or elementary particles. However, it was predicted by Nobel laureate Julian Schwinger 70 years ago that intense electric or magnetic fields can break down the vacuum and spontaneously create elementary particles.

Read the full story Posted: Jan 28,2022

India’s first graphene innovation center to be established in Kerala

It was recently reported that India’s first innovation center for graphene will be set up in Kerala by the Digital University Kerala (DUK), along with Centre for Materials for Electronics Technology (C-MET) in Thrissur, for an investment of Rs 86.41 crore (over USD$11.5 million). Tata Steel Limited is set to be the industrial partner of the center.

The chief investigators of the project, who will also lead it are Dr. AP James of DUK and Dr. A Seema of C-MET. The main collaborators include scientists from the National Graphene Institute, University of Manchester, and other industrial partners from around the world.

Read the full story Posted: Jan 26,2022

Graphene Innovations launches UK operations

Graphene Innovations Inc has signed a new Tier-1 partnership with Manchester University's GEIC center. The company will establish a local company (GIIM) in the UK, with plans to hire 10 employees in the next few months.

The GEIC partnership enables GIIM to equip a private lab in the facility, with access to highly specialised applications labs and equipment, plus the unique academic and engineering expertise of the world-leading graphene and 2D materials community at the University.

Read the full story Posted: Jan 14,2022

New graphene-based neural probes improve detection of epileptic brain signals

Researchers the UK and Spain have demonstrated that tiny graphene neural probes can be used safely to improve our understanding of the causes of epilepsy.

The graphene depth neural probe (gDNP) consists of a millimeter-long linear array of micro-transistors imbedded in a micrometer-thin polymeric flexible substrate. The transistors were developed by a collaboration between The University of Manchester’s Neuromedicine Lab and UCL’s Institute of Neurology along with their Graphene Flagship partners.

Read the full story Posted: Dec 26,2021

Researchers achieve precision sieving of gases through atomic pores in graphene

A team of researchers, led by Professor Sir Andre Geim at The University of Manchester, in collaboration with scientists from Belgium and China, used low-energy electrons to make individual atomic-scale holes in suspended graphene. The holes came in sizes down to about two angstroms, smaller than even the smallest atoms like helium and hydrogen.

Exponentially selective molecular sieving through angstrom pores image

The researchers report that they achieved practically perfect selectivity (better than 99.9%) for such gases as helium or hydrogen with respect to nitrogen, methane or xenon. Also, air molecules (oxygen and nitrogen) pass through the pores easily relative to carbon dioxide, which is >95% captured.

Read the full story Posted: Dec 09,2021

What's next for graphene in the construction industry? Graphene@Manchester's CEO sheds light on this fascinating topic

Graphene has a great potential in the construction industry, to increase the performance of materials and structures, to reduce costs and to reduce the environmental footprint of one of the world's most polluting industries.

After years of R&D, it seems as if graphene is finally get ready for commercial adoption on the market. Here's a short interview we did with James Baker, the CEO at Graphene@Manchester who's behind much of the progress we've seen recently.

Read the full story Posted: Nov 15,2021

SmartIR uses graphene to allow satellites to control thermal radiation

SmartIR, a spin-out of the University of Manchester, is working on a graphene-based smart coating for satellites, to allow them to control thermal radiation on demand, depending on whether a satellite’s surface is Earth’s shadow or on the side closest to the Sun.

This graphene technology is said to be a far more optimal solution as it is lightweight, has a low power consumption, can respond quickly to temperature changes, operates across the infrared spectrum, and involves no moving parts.

Read the full story Posted: Nov 13,2021