Graphene and quantum dots enable a unique CMOS-integrated camera

May 30, 2017

Researchers from the ICFO have developed the first graphene-QDs-CMOS integrated camera, capable of imaging visible and infrared light at the same time. The camera may be useful for many applications like night vision, food inspection, fire control, vision under extreme weather conditions, and more.

The imaging system is said to be based on the first monolithic integration of graphene and quantum dot photodetectors, with a CMOS (complementary metal-oxide semiconductors) read-out integrated circuit. The implementation of such a platform in applications other than microcircuits and visible light cameras has been impeded by the difficulty to combine semiconductors other than silicon with CMOS, an obstacle that has been overcome in this work.

Korea-based ETRI develops OLED display with graphene transparent electrodes

Apr 11, 2017

Researchers from the Korea-based ETRI (Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute) have used graphene transparent electrodes to create an OLED display, 370mm x 470mm in size.

ETRI graphene-electrode OLED prototype, Apr 2017

The ETRI team designed a process that can pattern a graphene-made transparent electrode in accurate size on a glass substrate. The researchers replaced indium tin oxide used for current commercial applications, that is a rare metal known for being brittle.

Kansas U team takes an explosive approach to graphene manufacturing

Jan 26, 2017

A team of researchers at Kansas State University has discovered a way to mass-produce graphene with three ingredients: hydrocarbon gas, oxygen and a spark plug. The technique involves filling a chamber with acetylene or ethylene gas and oxygen and using a vehicle spark plug to create a contained detonation - all that's left then, according to the team, is collecting the graphene that forms afterward.

The researchers state that this is a viable process to make graphene; they explain that the process has many positive properties, like economic feasibility, the possibility for large-scale production and the lack of hazardous chemicals. What might be the best property of all is that the energy required to make a gram of graphene through this process is much lower than other processes.

Nanomedical Diagnostics starts shipping its graphene-based sensors, explains its technology and business to Graphene-Info

Dec 04, 2016

San Diego-based Nanomedical Diagnostics, established in late 2013 to develop cutting-edge diagnostics equipment, recently started shipping its graphene-based sensors and the AGILE R100 system which allows for real-time detection of small molecules - with no lower size limit. Nanomedical's graphene-based sensors enable faster sample processing, greater accuracy, portability and cost savings.

Nanomedical Diagnostics Agile R100 photo

TThe company's CEO, Ross Bundy, was kind enough to explain the company's technology and business to us.

Versarien - Think you know graphene? Think again!Versarien - Think you know graphene? Think again!