Graphene-Info: the graphene experts

Graphene-Info has been the leading international graphene publication for over 5 years, with a readership of tens of thousands of professionals a month. We provide a multitude of services to the graphene market based on our extensive and up-to-date knowledge hub and close ties with industry leaders. Our consultancy services include market outreach assistance, nanomaterials brokerage, support for graphene initiatives, business development and more.

Graphene is the world's strongest, thinnest and most conductive material, made from carbon. Graphene's remarkable properties enable exciting new applications in electronics, solar panels, batteries, medicine, aerospace, 3D printing and more!

Recent graphene News

Graphene and porphyrins join to create an exciting new material

Jan 08, 2017

Researchers at the Technical University of Munich have found that graphene can be combined with porphyrins, the molecules that convey oxygen in haemoglobin and absorb light during photosynthesis, to get a material with exciting new properties. The resulting hybrid structures could be used in the field of molecular electronics, solar cells and in developing new sensors.

Porphyrins and graphene join to make a new material image

The technique involves growing a graphene layer on a surface of silver to use its catalytic properties. Then, under ultra-high vacuum conditions, porphyrin molecules are added. These lose the hydrogen atoms from their periphery when heated on the metal surface, and they end up connecting to the graphene edges.

Polish team creates transparent cryogenic temperature sensor

Jan 08, 2017

Researchers from the Lodz University of Technology in Poland have designed a transparent, flexible cryogenic temperature sensor with graphene structures as sensing elements. Such sensors could be useful for any field that requires operating in low-temperatures, such as medical diagnostics, space exploration and aviation, processing and storage of food and scientific research.

Making graphene transparent cryogenic temperature sensors

The sensors were repeatedly cooled from room temperature to cryogenic temperature. Graphene structures were characterized using Raman spectroscopy. The observation of the resistance changes as a function of temperature indicates the potential use of graphene in the construction of temperature sensors. The temperature characteristics of the analyzed graphene sensors exhibit no clear anomalies or strong non-linearity in the entire studied temperature range (as compared to the typical carbon sensor).

The Sixth Element and Daopeng unveil new graphene-based anti-corrosion coatings

Jan 08, 2017

The Sixth Element (Changzhou) logoIn a recent coatings event held in China, The Sixth Element and Daopeng Technology presented graphene-based anti-corrosion coatings.

The anti-corrosion coatings based on grapheneSE1132 from The Sixth Element are said to be a milestone for anti-corrosion applications in marine environment. Adding 1% graphene to the primer, formulated with only 25% zinc powder, more than 3000 hours can be achieved in the salt spray test. Compared to conventional anti-corrosion systems using 70%-80% zinc powder, this new formulation with 1% graphene reduces the necessary zinc amount by more than 50%.

MIT team uses graphene to create ultra-strong 3D materials

Jan 08, 2017

Researchers at MIT have designed a strong and lightweight material, by compressing and fusing flakes of graphene. The new material, a sponge-like configuration with a density of just 5%, can have a strength 10 times that of steel. This work could pose an interesting way of transforming graphene into useful 3D objects and items.MIT created superstrong graphene 3D material image

The team developed the product by using a combination of both heat and pressure, compressing and fusing the flakes of graphene together. This process produced a strong, stable structure whose form resembles that of some corals and microscopic creatures called diatoms. These shapes, which have an enormous surface area in proportion to their volume, proved to be remarkably strong.

Graphene-Info launches a new Graphene Oxide market report

Jan 05, 2017

We're happy to announce a new market report, Graphene Oxide Market Report. This report, brought to you by the world's leading graphene experts, is a comprehensive guide to the graphene oxide market. Graphene Oxide is an exciting material with promising applications in diverse areas - including energy storage, composite materials, bio-medical, water treatment and more. Graphene Oxide can also be reduced to make conductive graphene flakes (r-GO).

graphene oxide- report cover

Reading this report, you'll learn all about:

  • The difference between graphene oxide and graphene
  • Graphene oxide properties
  • Possible applications for graphene oxide
  • Reduction of graphene oxide to r-GO
  • Available materials on the market

The report also provides:

  • A list of prominent GO research activities
  • A list of all graphene oxide developers and their products
  • Sample graphene oxide implementations
  • Datasheets for over 20 different GO materials
  • Free updates for a year

XG Sciences secures financing from The Dow Chemical Company

Jan 05, 2017

XG Sciences logoXG Sciences, a supplier of graphene nanoplatelets and value-added products containing graphene nanoplatelets, recently announced that it has closed an agreement with The Dow Chemical Company for up to a $10 million senior credit facility, which may be drawn down in tranches by XGS at its discretion through December 2019.

The company received $2 million under this facility at close and may draw another $3 million at its discretion at any time prior to the first anniversary of the agreement. After the first anniversary of the closing, the company may access the remaining $5 million, provided it has raised at least $10 million of additional equity capital. XG Sciences and Dow agreed to hold commercial discussions including the potential out-license of certain of Dow’s manufacturing IP related to graphene nanoplatelets to XGS.

Graphene-CNT junctions could be turned into excellent heat conductors

Jan 05, 2017

Researchers at Rice University have found that it may be possible to make graphene-carbon nanotube junctions excel at transferring heat, turning these into an attractive way to channel damaging heat away from next-generation nano-electronics. This could, in theory, be done by putting a cone-like “chimney” between the graphene and nanotube to eliminate the barrier that blocks heat from escaping.

Graphene-CNT junctions could be made to transfer heat image

Graphene and carbon nanotubes both excel at the rapid transfer of electricity and phonons, but when a nanotube grows from graphene, atoms facilitate the turn by forming heptagonal (seven-member) rings instead of the usual six-atom rings. Scientists have determined that forests of nanotubes grown from graphene are excellent for storing hydrogen for energy applications, but in electronics, the heptagons scatter phonons and hinder the escape of heat through the pillars.