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Graphene is a one-atom-thick sheet of carbon atoms arranged in a honeycomb-like pattern. Graphene is considered to be the world's thinnest, strongest and most conductive material - to both electricity and heat. All this properties are exciting researchers and businesses around the world - as graphene has the potential the revolutionize entire industries - in the fields of electricity, conductivity, energy generation, batteries, sensors and more.

Mechanical strength

Graphene is the world's strongest material, and so can be used to enhance the strength of other materials. Dozens of researches have demonstrated that adding even a trade amount of graphene to plastics, metals or other materials can make these materials much stronger - or lighter (as you can use less amount of material to achieve the same strength).



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Such graphene-enhanced composite materials can find uses in aerospace, building materials, mobile devices, and many other applications.

Thermal applications

Graphene is the world's most conductive material to heat. As graphene is also strong and light, it means that it is a great material to make heat-spreading solutions, such as heat sinks. This could be useful in both microelectronics (for example to make LED lighting more efficient and longer lasting) and also in larger applications - for example thermal foils for mobile devices.

graphene-bulb-demonstration-image

Energy storage

Because graphene is the world's thinnest material, it is also the material with the highest surface-area to volume ratio. This makes graphene a very promising material to be used in batteries and supercapacitors. Graphene may enable devices that can store more energy - and charge faster, too. Graphene can also be used to enhance fuel-cells.

Coatings ,sensors, electronics and more

Graphene has a lot of other promising applications: anti-corrosion coatings and paints, efficient and precise sensors, faster and efficient electronics, flexible displays, efficient solar panels, faster DNA sequencing, drug delivery, and more.

Graphene is such a great and basic building block that it seems that any industry can benefit from this new material. Time will tell where graphene will indeed make an impact - or whether other new materials will be more suitable.

Latest graphene application news

Graphene and porphyrins join to create an exciting new material

Jan 08, 2017

Researchers at the Technical University of Munich have found that graphene can be combined with porphyrins, the molecules that convey oxygen in haemoglobin and absorb light during photosynthesis, to get a material with exciting new properties. The resulting hybrid structures could be used in the field of molecular electronics, solar cells and in developing new sensors.

Porphyrins and graphene join to make a new material image

The technique involves growing a graphene layer on a surface of silver to use its catalytic properties. Then, under ultra-high vacuum conditions, porphyrin molecules are added. These lose the hydrogen atoms from their periphery when heated on the metal surface, and they end up connecting to the graphene edges.

Polish team creates transparent cryogenic temperature sensor

Jan 08, 2017

Researchers from the Lodz University of Technology in Poland have designed a transparent, flexible cryogenic temperature sensor with graphene structures as sensing elements. Such sensors could be useful for any field that requires operating in low-temperatures, such as medical diagnostics, space exploration and aviation, processing and storage of food and scientific research.

Making graphene transparent cryogenic temperature sensors

The sensors were repeatedly cooled from room temperature to cryogenic temperature. Graphene structures were characterized using Raman spectroscopy. The observation of the resistance changes as a function of temperature indicates the potential use of graphene in the construction of temperature sensors. The temperature characteristics of the analyzed graphene sensors exhibit no clear anomalies or strong non-linearity in the entire studied temperature range (as compared to the typical carbon sensor).

Graphene Investment Guide

The Sixth Element and Daopeng unveil new graphene-based anti-corrosion coatings

Jan 08, 2017

The Sixth Element (Changzhou) logoIn a recent coatings event held in China, The Sixth Element and Daopeng Technology presented graphene-based anti-corrosion coatings.

The anti-corrosion coatings based on grapheneSE1132 from The Sixth Element are said to be a milestone for anti-corrosion applications in marine environment. Adding 1% graphene to the primer, formulated with only 25% zinc powder, more than 3000 hours can be achieved in the salt spray test. Compared to conventional anti-corrosion systems using 70%-80% zinc powder, this new formulation with 1% graphene reduces the necessary zinc amount by more than 50%.

MIT team uses graphene to create ultra-strong 3D materials

Jan 08, 2017

Researchers at MIT have designed a strong and lightweight material, by compressing and fusing flakes of graphene. The new material, a sponge-like configuration with a density of just 5%, can have a strength 10 times that of steel. This work could pose an interesting way of transforming graphene into useful 3D objects and items.MIT created superstrong graphene 3D material image

The team developed the product by using a combination of both heat and pressure, compressing and fusing the flakes of graphene together. This process produced a strong, stable structure whose form resembles that of some corals and microscopic creatures called diatoms. These shapes, which have an enormous surface area in proportion to their volume, proved to be remarkably strong.

Graphene-CNT junctions could be turned into excellent heat conductors

Jan 05, 2017

Researchers at Rice University have found that it may be possible to make graphene-carbon nanotube junctions excel at transferring heat, turning these into an attractive way to channel damaging heat away from next-generation nano-electronics. This could, in theory, be done by putting a cone-like “chimney” between the graphene and nanotube to eliminate the barrier that blocks heat from escaping.

Graphene-CNT junctions could be made to transfer heat image

Graphene and carbon nanotubes both excel at the rapid transfer of electricity and phonons, but when a nanotube grows from graphene, atoms facilitate the turn by forming heptagonal (seven-member) rings instead of the usual six-atom rings. Scientists have determined that forests of nanotubes grown from graphene are excellent for storing hydrogen for energy applications, but in electronics, the heptagons scatter phonons and hinder the escape of heat through the pillars.