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Graphene is a one-atom-thick sheet of carbon atoms arranged in a honeycomb-like pattern. Graphene is considered to be the world's thinnest, strongest and most conductive material - to both electricity and heat. All this properties are exciting researchers and businesses around the world - as graphene has the potential the revolutionize entire industries - in the fields of electricity, conductivity, energy generation, batteries, sensors and more.

Mechanical strength

Graphene is the world's strongest material, and so can be used to enhance the strength of other materials. Dozens of researches have demonstrated that adding even a trade amount of graphene to plastics, metals or other materials can make these materials much stronger - or lighter (as you can use less amount of material to achieve the same strength).



applications of composites image

Such graphene-enhanced composite materials can find uses in aerospace, building materials, mobile devices, and many other applications.

Thermal applications

Graphene is the world's most conductive material to heat. As graphene is also strong and light, it means that it is a great material to make heat-spreading solutions, such as heat sinks. This could be useful in both microelectronics (for example to make LED lighting more efficient and longer lasting) and also in larger applications - for example thermal foils for mobile devices.

graphene-bulb-demonstration-image

Energy storage

Because graphene is the world's thinnest material, it is also the material with the highest surface-area to volume ratio. This makes graphene a very promising material to be used in batteries and supercapacitors. Graphene may enable devices that can store more energy - and charge faster, too. Graphene can also be used to enhance fuel-cells.

Coatings ,sensors, electronics and more

Graphene has a lot of other promising applications: anti-corrosion coatings and paints, efficient and precise sensors, faster and efficient electronics, flexible displays, efficient solar panels, faster DNA sequencing, drug delivery, and more.

Graphene is such a great and basic building block that it seems that any industry can benefit from this new material. Time will tell where graphene will indeed make an impact - or whether other new materials will be more suitable.

Latest graphene application news

Monash University, Ionic Industries and Clean TeQ receive grant to develop GO-based water-treatment technology

Feb 22, 2017

Clean TeQ Holdings, along with Monash University and Ionic Industries, received a grant of $632,285 AUD (almost $500,000 USD) from the Australian Government under the Cooperative Research Centre’s Project (CRC-P) program, to develop energy efficient wastewater treatment technology using graphene oxide technology. The new project is scheduled to commence in March 2017.

Water treatment photo

Researchers at Monash University have developed a method of producing graphene oxide which is suitable for the production of water and wastewater filtration products. Clean TeQ has already commercialized its Continuous Ionic Filtration (CIF®) technology which is used for water and wastewater filtration. The use of graphene oxide adsorbents in Clean TeQ ‘s process will allow the capture of non-ionic species and thereby extend the range of waters than can be successfully treated.

Cambridge team develops a method for producing conductive graphene inks with high concentrations

Feb 22, 2017

Researchers at the Cambridge Graphene Centre at the University of Cambridge, UK, have designed a method for producing high quality conductive graphene inks with high concentrations. Conductive inks are useful for a range of applications, including printed and flexible electronics, transistors, and more.

The method uses ultrahigh shear forces in a microfluidization process to exfoliate graphene flakes from graphite. The process is said to convert 100% of the starting graphite material into usable flakes for conductive inks, avoiding the need for centrifugation and reducing the time taken to produce a usable ink. The research also describes optimization of the inks for different printing applications, as well as giving detailed insights into the fluid dynamics of graphite exfoliation.

Graphene Investment Guide

Graphenea, Nokia and IEMN-CNRS collaborate to create high-frequency graphene transistors on flexible substrates

Feb 21, 2017

Scientists from IEMN-CNRS, Graphenea, and Nokia have demonstrated flexible graphene transistors with a record high cut-off frequency of 39 GHz. The graphene devices, made on flexible polymer substrates, are stable against bending and fatigue of repeated flexing.

Graphenea and Nokia create impressive GFET image

The graphene field effect transistor (GFET) is made from high quality CVD grown graphene with a carrier mobility of ~2500 cm2 V-1 s-1 on a flexible Kapton substrate with a thin alumina dielectric spacer in the channel region. The use of such sophisticated and optimized materials leads to the record high frequency performance as well as stability against bending. The GFET reportedly continues to operate even after 1,000 bending cycles and can be flexed to a radius of 12 mm with a cutoff frequency shift of up to 10%.

Graphene coating on copper wires may help prevent electromigration and help minimize future electronics

Feb 21, 2017

As electronics keep shrinking in size, several problems arise. One of these is that the copper wires that connect transistors to form complex circuits need to be very thin, but carry so much current that can cause them to break apart due to atoms being knocked out of place. One was of solving this, studied by a group led by Stanford University, is to wrap copper with graphene. The group found that this can alleviate this major problem called electromigration.

stanford team solve electromigration problem with graphene coating image

This was presented at a recent IEEE meeting that addressed the coming problems for copper interconnects and debated ways of getting around them. Growing graphene around copper wires can help prevent electromigration, and also seems to bring down the resistance of the copper wires. Generally speaking, the narrower the wire, the higher its resistance. “Interconnects have had to shrink while increasing the current densities by 20 times,” said Intel Fellow Ruth Brain at the meeting.

Directa Plus receives European grant to develop graphene-based smart fabrics

Feb 20, 2017

Directa Plus logoDirecta Plus has been allocated a €1 million grant from the European Regional Development Fund for a research project to develop graphene-based smart fabrics.

The project will be focused on enhancing the thermal and electrical performance of textiles for fashion applications. Directa Plus will act as project leader, and will work in collaboration with fabric store Novaresin and manufacturer Soliani, as well as the Politecnico of Milan university.