NGI

Researchers capture images of atoms ‘swimming’ in liquid

Graphene scientists from The University of Manchester have created a novel ‘nano petri dish’ using two-dimensional (2D) materials to create a new method of observing how atoms move in liquid. The team, led by researchers based at the National Graphene Institute (NGI), used stacks of 2D materials including graphene to trap liquid in order to further understand how the presence of liquid changes the behavior of the solid.

Graphene scientists capture first images of atoms ‘swimming’ in liquid image

The researchers were able to capture images of single atoms ‘swimming’ in liquid for the first time. The findings could have widespread impact on the future development of green technologies such as hydrogen production.

Read the full story Posted: Jul 28,2022

Researchers develop electrically tunable graphene device to study rare physics

An international research team, led by The University of Manchester’s National Graphene Institute (NGI), has developed a tunable graphene-based platform that allows for fine control over the interaction between light and matter in the terahertz (THz) spectrum, revealing rare phenomena known as exceptional points. The team also included researchers from Pennsylvania State University and Turkey's Bilkent University and Izmir Institute of Technology.

The researchers estimate that this work could advance optoelectronic technologies to better generate, control and sense light and potentially communications. They demonstrated a way to control THz waves, which exist at frequencies between those of microwaves and infrared waves. The findings could contribute to the development of beyond-5G wireless technology for high-speed communication networks.

Read the full story Posted: Apr 10,2022

Graphene assists in observing the elusive Schwinger effect

Researchers at The University of Manchester, MIT and other international collaborators have succeeded in observing the so-called Schwinger effect, an elusive process that normally occurs only in cosmic events. By applying high currents through specially designed graphene-based devices, the team - based at the National Graphene Institute - succeeded in producing particle-antiparticle pairs from a vacuum.

A vacuum is assumed to be completely empty space, without any matter or elementary particles. However, it was predicted by Nobel laureate Julian Schwinger 70 years ago that intense electric or magnetic fields can break down the vacuum and spontaneously create elementary particles.

Read the full story Posted: Jan 28,2022

India’s first graphene innovation center to be established in Kerala

It was recently reported that India’s first innovation center for graphene will be set up in Kerala by the Digital University Kerala (DUK), along with Centre for Materials for Electronics Technology (C-MET) in Thrissur, for an investment of Rs 86.41 crore (over USD$11.5 million). Tata Steel Limited is set to be the industrial partner of the center.

The chief investigators of the project, who will also lead it are Dr. AP James of DUK and Dr. A Seema of C-MET. The main collaborators include scientists from the National Graphene Institute, University of Manchester, and other industrial partners from around the world.

Read the full story Posted: Jan 26,2022

Researchers demonstrate Doppler effect and sonic boom in graphene devices

A team of researchers from universities in Loughborough, Nottingham, Manchester, Lancaster and Kansas (US) has revealed that sonic boom and Doppler-shifted sound waves can be created in a graphene transistor.

When a police car speeds past you with its siren blaring, you hear a distinct change in the frequency of the siren’s noise. This is the Doppler effect. When a jet aircraft’s speed exceeds the speed of sound (about 760 mph), the pressure it exerts upon the air produces a shock wave which can be heard as a loud supersonic boom or thunderclap. This is the Mach effect. The scientists discovered that a quantum mechanical version of these phenomena occurs in an electronic transistor made from high-purity graphene.

Read the full story Posted: Nov 09,2021

Graphene 'smart surfaces' display a wide range of tunability

Researchers at The University of Manchester’s National Graphene Institute have created optical devices with a unique range of tunability, covering the entire electromagnetic spectrum, including visible light.

Multispectral graphene-based electro-optical surfaces image

The new study lists the possible applications for this ‘smart surface’ technology, that range from next-generation display devices to dynamic thermal blankets for satellites and multi-spectral adaptive camouflage.

Read the full story Posted: Apr 07,2021

First Graphene to collaborate with M&I Materials on development of graphene-enhanced products

Graphene raw materials supplier First Graphene and UK-based specialist materials manufacturer M&I Materials have agreed to collaborate to develop an extended range of graphene-enhanced products.

Both companies are partners at Manchester’s Graphene Engineering and Innovation Centre (GEIC), a facility dedicated to the commercialization of graphene. The GEIC has played a big part in enabling this collaboration and has benefited both parties in terms of the close working relationship at the same location and the extensive facilities and support available on site.

Read the full story Posted: Oct 06,2020

Graphene-enhanced smart textiles developed for heat adaptive clothing

New research at the University of Manchester's National Graphene Institute focuses on graphene-enhanced smart adaptive clothing which can lower the body temperature of the wearer in hot climates.

Graphene smart adaptive clothing can lower the body temperature of the wearer in hot climates image

The team of scientists has created a prototype garment to demonstrate dynamic thermal radiation control within a piece of clothing by utilizing the remarkable thermal properties and flexibility of graphene. The development also opens the door to new applications such as, interactive infrared displays and covert infrared communication on textiles.

Read the full story Posted: Jun 19,2020

Graphene-based yarn to enable advanced wearable e-textiles

Researchers at the National Graphene Institute (NGI) have created a method to produce scalable graphene-based yarn. Such e-textiles may have great potential for sportswear, healthcare, aerospace, and fitness applications, and so are attracting research attention worldwide.

Graphene-based yarn to be used for advanced wearable e-textiles

Integrating textile-based sensors into garments in the manufacturing process is still time-consuming and complex. It is also expensive non-biodegradable, unstable, metallic conductive materials are still being used. Now, the NGI researchers have developed a process that has the potential to produce tonnes of conductive graphene-based yarn. It is possible to do this using current textile machinery without any addition to production costs. The produces graphene-based yarn is also said to be flexible, cheap, biodegradable, and washable.

Read the full story Posted: Mar 09,2019

LifeSaver and NGI to collaborate on graphene-enhanced water filtration system

LifeSaver, a UK-based manufacturer of portable and reusable water filtration systems, has announced an exclusive contract with the National Graphene Institute (NGI) at The University of Manchester.

The 18-month research project will focus on developing graphene technology that can be used for enhanced water filtration, with the goal of creating a proprietary and patented, cutting-edge product capable of eliminating an even wider range of hazardous contaminants than currently removed by its existing high-performance ultra-filtration process.

Read the full story Posted: Feb 12,2019