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Graphene is the world's strongest, thinnest and most conductive material, made from carbon. Graphene's remarkable properties enable exciting new applications in electronics, solar panels, batteries, medicine, aerospace, 3D printing and more!

Recent graphene News

Zap&Go awarded with $1.6 million from the EU to continue development of its graphene supercapacitor enhanced power tools

May 23, 2017

UK-based graphene supercapacitor developer Zap&Go announced that it was awarded with a $1.6 million USD from the European Union to perfect the prototype cordless tools powered by its fast-charging graphene supercapacitors.

ZapGo graphene supercapacitor powered tool prototype (PE Europe 2017)

Zap&Go initiated a self-funded feasibility study to embed its graphene supercapacitors in cordless tools. The company says that it has received commitments from major OEMs in joint development agreements. In this new EU-funded project, Zap&Go intends to further develop its power modules and electronics, integrating them with cordless tools such as vacuum cleaners and power drills, and finally build units to conduct customer trials.

Manipulating the electron spin can lower the contact resistance in graphene-metal interfaces

May 22, 2017

NUS researchers discovered that manipulating the electron spin lowers the contact resistance in graphene-metal interfaces, which normally suffer from large electrical resistance.

Spin filtering in metal-graphene interfaces image

The researchers have shown that edga-contacted device geometries in metallic-graphene interfaces feature some of the lowest contact resistances reported to date - significantly lower than in surface-contracted interfaces. The researchers explain that this is due to the different behavior of electron spins in these geometries.

Graphene-based sensor may improve the diagnosis and treatment of asthma

May 22, 2017

Rutgers University scientists have created a graphene-based sensor that could lead to earlier detection of asthma attacks and improve the management respiratory diseases, possibly preventing hospitalizations and deaths.

Rutgers team's graphene sensor to diagnose asthma image

The Rutgers team aims for the sensor to pave the way for the development of devices - possibly resembling fitness trackers - which people could wear and then know when and at what dosage to take their medication.

Tackling graphene oxide's flammability issue may open the door to various applications

May 21, 2017

Researchers from the University of Arkansas have tackled the issue of graphene oxide's flammability; The team explains that scaling up the production of graphene-based materials is often problematic and dangerous due to GO's tendency to become explosive once airborne, so solving this problem may prove important.

In their work, the team established a relatively simple method to cross-link GO with Al3+ cations, in one step, into a freestanding flexible membrane. This membrane resists in-air burning on an open flame, at which non-cross-linked GO was burnt out within ∼5 s. With the improved thermal and water stabilities, the cross-linked GO film can help advance high-temperature fuel cells, electronic packaging, etc.

Researchers from China create graphene aerogel that converts sunlight into heat to produce water vapor at room temperature

May 21, 2017

Researchers at the Chinese Hubei University have designed a graphene aerogel film capable of producing water vapor at room temperature using only sunlight. The aerogel floats on the surface, where it heats up only a small part of the water column, ‘while the temperature of the bulk water is far below the boiling point’, the team explains.

Graphene aerogel assists water treatment image

This sunlight-harvesting graphene film could convert sea or wastewater into drinking water in places where fuel or access to electricity is limited. Desalinating seawater to make it drinkable usually means boiling it, and then collecting and condensing the steam. Heating water to its boiling point, however, requires quite a lot of energy, which is not always easy to come by. There are solar stills that desalinate water using only sunlight, but they’re slow and not always efficient enough to provide sufficient drinking water for a person’s daily needs.

Talga reports impressive concrete strength test results using its graphene

May 21, 2017

Talga Resources logo 2017Australia-based technology minerals company, Talga Resources, recently announced impressive initial concrete prototype strength results from trials undertaken at the commercial concrete/cement laboratory of Betotech Baustofflabor in Germany.

Graphene and graphite enhanced cement and concrete are key priority product targets for Talga. Concrete test prototypes were formulated with Talga graphene and graphite additives combined with a European industry cement and aggregate mixture. Results from the trial showed significant increases, about 26% in flexural strength and 14% in compressive strength, using Talga materials over reference concrete at 28 days cure time.

Rice U team demonstrates a graphene-CNTs hybrid that could give Lithium batteries a major boost

May 21, 2017

Researchers at Rice University have created a rechargeable Li-ion battery, based on a hybrid of graphene and carbon nanotubes, with three times the capacity of commercial lithium-ion batteries. This was achieved mainly by addressing a major challenge known as the dendrite problem.

Rice U team's graphene-CNTs hybrid for lithium batteries image

The Rice battery stores lithium in a unique anode made of a seamless hybrid of graphene and carbon nanotubes. The material (first created at Rice in 2012) is basically a 3D carbon surface that provides abundant area for lithium to occupy. The anode itself is said to approach the theoretical maximum for storage of lithium metal with its 3,351 milliamp hours per gram capacity, while resisting the formation of damaging dendrites or "mossy" deposits.