Graphene-Info: the graphene experts

Graphene-Info has been the leading international graphene publication for over 9 years, with a readership of tens of thousands of professionals a month. We provide a multitude of services to the graphene market based on our extensive and up-to-date knowledge hub and close ties with industry leaders. Our consultancy services include market outreach assistance, nanomaterials brokerage, support for graphene initiatives, business development and more.

Graphene is the world's strongest, thinnest and most conductive material, made from carbon. Graphene's remarkable properties enable exciting new applications in electronics, solar panels, batteries, medicine, aerospace, 3D printing and more!

Recent graphene News

Graphene-Info's Batteries, Supercapacitors, Graphene Oxide, Lighting, Displays and Graphene Investments Market Reports updated to July 2019

Today we published new versions of all our graphene market reports. Graphene-Info provides comprehensive niche graphene market reports, and our reports cover everything you need to know about these niche markets. The reports are now updated to July 2019.

Graphene batteries market report 3D cover

The Graphene Batteries Market Report:

  • The advantages using graphene batteries
  • The different ways graphene can be used in batteries
  • Various types of graphene materials
  • What's on the market today
  • Detailed specifications of some graphene-enhanced anode material
  • Personal contact details into most graphene developers

The report package provides a good introduction to the graphene battery - present and future. It includes a list of all graphene companies involved with batteries and gives detailed specifications of some graphene-enhanced anode materials and contact details into most graphene developers. Read more here!

Paragraf raises USD$16 million to push forward graphene-based electronics technologies

Paragraf logo imageUK-based graphene technology company Paragraf has announced the close of its £12.8 million (over $16 million USD ) Series A round led by Parkwalk. The round also included investment from IQ Capital Partners, Amadeus Capital Partners and Cambridge Enterprise, the commercialization arm of the University of Cambridge, as well as several angel investors. The funding will aim to see Paragraf’s first graphene-based electronics products reach the market, transitioning the company into a commercial, revenue-generating entity.

Paragraf sets out to deliver IP-protected graphene technology using standard, mass production scale manufacturing approaches, enabling step-change performance enhancements to today’s electronic devices. The company’s first sensor products have reportedly demonstrated order of magnitude operational improvements over today’s incumbents. Achieving large-scale, graphene-based production technology may enable next generation electronics, including vastly increased computing speeds, significantly improved medical diagnostics and higher efficiency renewable energy generation as well as currently unachievable products such as instant charging batteries and very low power, flexible electronics.

Versarien receives graphene orders from Japanese automotive company

Versarien LogoVersarien, UK-based advanced materials engineering group, has announced that it has secured its first graphene orders from the North American corporate research and development center of a Japanese headquartered company. This customer was described as a global automotive components company that has operations in over 40 countries, employing in excess of 250,000 people.

After initial graphene quality testing trials, the Customer has placed development orders for 1kg each of Versarien's high purity graphene nano platelets ("GNP-HP") and Nanene. The Customer's principle operations focus on leading-edge automotive materials and process development, and the development of next-generation, vehicle-related, information and communications technology.

Highways England to explore the use of graphene for UK roads

Highways England, a government responsible for motorways and major A roads, has partnered with the Graphene Engineering Innovation Center (GEIC), in order to use graphene to address challenges experienced by the road network in England, such as the deterioration of surfaces. Highways England believes adding graphene into maintenance and renewals operations has the potential to extend asset life and make the network perform at an industry changing level.

The partnership will explore the operational and road user benefit of incorporating graphene into assets such as road surfacing and road markings, as well as help to drive the development of a low carbon and digital road network.

AGM reaches tech progress in the coatings field and announces new liquid coating roofing system

Applied Graphene Materials logoApplied Graphene Materials recently announced it has achieved significant technological progress (patent pending) on the deployment of graphene into water-based coatings to enhance their barrier properties. This water-based breakthrough is based on AGM's platform Genable technology, a range of master dispersions that are designed to facilitate the easy incorporation of graphene into coating formulations and existing processes.

Applied Graphene Materials also announced that UK-based Alltimes Coatings, a leading specialist in the supply and application of protective coatings for buildings, is launching its new Advantage Graphene liquid coating roofing system, with significantly enhanced anti-corrosion performance delivered by the incorporation of AGM's graphene.

Researchers produce graphene by mixing oxidized graphite with bacteria

Researchers at the U.S-based University of Rochester, along with colleagues at Delft University of Technology in the Netherlands, have designed a way to produce graphene materials using a novel technique: mixing oxidized graphite with bacteria. Their method is reportedly a more cost-efficient, time-saving, and environmentally friendly way of producing graphene materials versus those produced chemically, and could lead to the creation of innovative computer technologies and medical equipment.

Bacterially-made graphene is faster, cheaper and better imageFrom left to right:graphite (Gr), graphene oxide (GO), microbially‐reduced graphene oxide (mrGO), and chemically‐reduced graphene oxide (crGO)

"For real applications you need large amounts," says Anne S. Meyer, an associate professor of biology at the University of Rochester. "Producing these bulk amounts is challenging and typically results in graphene that is thicker and less pure. This is where our work came in". In order to produce larger quantities of graphene materials, Meyer and her colleagues started with a vial of graphite. They exfoliated the graphite-shedding the layers of material-to produce graphene oxide (GO), which they then mixed with the bacteria Shewanella. They let the beaker of bacteria and precursor materials sit overnight, during which time the bacteria reduced the GO to a graphene material.