Directa Plus logoItaly-based Directa Plus announced the launch of GRAFYLON 3D, a graphene-enhanced filament for 3D printing. The new product has been developed in collaboration with FILOALFA, a division of Ciceri de Mondel that specializes in producing filaments used in 3D printing, and is now commercially available. RAFYLON® 3D is available starting today for purchase directly from the FILOALFA website and from FILOALFA’s dealers.

GRAFYLON 3D is a new generation of polylactic acid-based (PLA) filament containing Directa’s graphene-based product. In 3D printing, hundreds or thousands of layers of material are “printed” layer upon layer using various materials, most commonly plastic polymers such as PLA filaments. The inclusion of the company's Graphene Plus enhances the filament’s properties, while reportedly maintaining a competitive price. During testing, the following improvements in performance compared with non-graphene-based 3D filaments were observed:

  • Improvement in surface finish, with a unique aesthetic effect
  • Thermal conduction properties
  • Elastic modulus improvement by 34%
  • Tensile strength higher by 23%
  • Elongation higher by 28%

Giulio Cesareo, CEO of Directa Plus, said: “We are delighted to launch GRAFYLON® 3D, in collaboration with FILOALFA, which is our first product in the 3D printing market. Our new filaments provide advantages over non-graphene-based filaments that open up new areas of application for 3D printing based on the incredible properties, such as conductivity and material strength. We believe they can revolutionize industry standards in the 3D printing field...."

FILOALFA representtatives state that GRAFYLON® 3D is only the first of a new generation of filaments containing graphene developed with Directa Plus, and that the two companies are working to produce additional graphene-based products with unique properties that will differentiate them from competing solutions.

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