The Graphene Flagship is a Future and Emerging Technology Flagship project by the European Commission. With a budget of €1 billion, the Graphene Flagship represents a new form of joint, coordinated research on a large scale, forming Europe's biggest ever research initiative.

Graphene flagship logo

Launched in 2013, the Graphene Flagship’s mission is to advance graphene commercialization and take graphene and related materials from academic laboratories to society within 10 years, while revolutionizing entire industries and creating economic growth and new jobs in Europe.

The core consortium consists of about 150 academic and industrial research groups in over 20 countries. In addition, the project has a growing number of associated members that will be incorporated in the scientific and technological work packages from the Horizon 2020 phase (1 April 2016 – 31 March 2018). The project started in a ramp-up phase (October 2013 till the end of March 2016), then planned to enter into the steady-state phase (2016-2020).

The research effort covers the entire value chain from materials production to components and system integration, and targets a number of specific goals that exploit the unique properties of graphene. The Graphene Flagship is coordinated by Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.

Latest Graphene Flagship news



Manipulating electron spin in graphene may enable ambient-temperature FETs

Jul 09, 2017

Researchers at Chalmers University, affiliated with the Graphene Flagship, have devised a graphene-based spin field-effect transistor with the ability to function at room temperature. The team used the spin of electrons in graphene and similar layered material heterostructures to fabricate working devices in a step towards combining memory devices and the logic of spintronics.

Graphene spintronics FETs image

The researchers demonstrated that the spin characteristics of graphene can be electrically regulated in a controlled way, even at an ambient temperature. In addition to possibly unlocking various probabilities in spin logic operations, this study also enables integration with magnetic memory elements in a device unit. If further advancements can assist in the production of a spin current without the need for charge flow, the amount of power needed will be considerably reduced, resulting in highly versatile devices.

Graphene Flagship research teams prepare to test graphene's potential for aerospace applications

Jul 08, 2017

The Graphene Flagship has announced preparations for two new experiments in collaboration with the European Space Agency (ESA), to test the viability of graphene for space applications. Both experiments will launch between 6-17th November 2017, testing graphene in zero-gravity conditions to determine its potential in space applications.

Graphene Flagship aerospace experiments image

One of the two experiments (named GrapheneX) will be fully student-led, by a team of Graphene Flagship graduate students from Delft Technical University in the Netherlands. The team will use microgravity conditions in the ZARM Drop Tower (Bremen, Germany) to test graphene for light sails. By shining laser light on suspended graphene-membranes from Flagship partner Graphenea, the experiment will test how much thrust can be generated, which could lead to a new way of propelling satellites in space using light from lasers or the sun.

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High performance graphene transistors developed by Graphene Flagship researchers

Jun 07, 2017

An international team of scientists collaborating in the Graphene Flagship project has developed a graphene-based transistor that reportedly outperforms previous state-of-the-art ones. The team utilized a thin top gate insulator material to optimize operational properties like maximum oscillation frequency, cutoff frequency, forward transmission coefficient, and open-circuit voltage gain, realizing devices that show prospect of using graphene in a wide range of electronic applications.

Graphene Flagship team develops high performance graphene transistors image

Graphene lack of a bandgap hinders its use in electronics since it causes an inability to switch the transistors off, effectively rendering the “0” state in digital logic inaccessible. However, many analog applications do not require a bandgap; The team explains that the only undesired side-effect of using GFETs in analog circuits is a poor saturation of the drain current, which prevents high-gain operation. The researchers have now succeeded in improving saturation by optimizing the dielectric material (AlOx) that is used to electrically insulate the top gate of the GFET. An improved quality of gate dielectric resulted in strong control over carriers in the graphene channel, yielding overall performance benefits.

Graphene Flagship team creates transistors printed with graphene and other layered materials

Apr 09, 2017

Graphene Flagship researchers from AMBER at Trinity College Dublin, in collaboration with scientists from TU Delft, Netherlands, have fabricated printed transistors consisting entirely of layered materials. The team's findings are said to have the potential to cheaply print a range of electronic devices from solar cells to LEDs and more.

The team used standard printing techniques to combine graphene flakes as the electrodes with other layered materials, tungsten diselenide and boron nitride as the channel and separator to form an all-printed, all-layered materials, working transistor.

The Graphene Flagship develops graphene-based neural probes

Mar 29, 2017

Researchers from the Graphene Flagship have developed a new graphene-based device able to record brain activity in high resolution while maintaining excellent signal to noise ratio (SNR). Based on graphene field-effect transistors, the flexible devices have to potential to open up new possibilities for the development of functional implants and interfaces.

Graphene-enabled neural probes by the Graphene Flagship image

Neural activity is detected through the electric fields generated when neurons fire. These fields are highly localized, so having ultra-small measuring devices that can be densely packed is important for accurate brain readings. The graphene-based probes are reportedly competitive with state-of-the-art platinum electrode arrays and have the benefits of intrinsic signal amplification and a better signal-to-noise performance when scaled down to very small sizes. This will allow for more densely packed and higher resolution probes, vital for precision mapping of brain activity. The inherent amplification property of the transistor also removes the need for a pre-amplification close to the probe – a requirement for metal electrodes.