New method to produce graphene nanoribbons could promote use in telecommunications applications

University of Wisconsin–Madison researchers have fabricated graphene into the smallest ribbon structures to date, using a method that is said to make scaling-up simple. In tests with these tiny ribbons, the scientists discovered they were closing in on the properties they needed to move graphene toward usefulness in telecommunications equipment.

Flexible, easy-to-scale nanoribbons move graphene toward use in tech applications imageImage credit: University of Wisconsin−Madison

“Previous research suggested that to be viable for telecommunication technologies, graphene would need to be structured prohibitively small over large areas, (which is) a fabrication nightmare,” says Joel Siegel, a UW–Madison graduate student in physics professor Victor Brar’s group and co-lead author of the study. “In our study, we created a scalable fabrication technique to make the smallest graphene ribbon structures yet and found that with modest further reductions in ribbon width, we can start getting to telecommunications range.”

POSCO sets out to establish a graphene ecosystem to meet growing demand

South Korea's leading steel group, POSCO, will reportedly lead the creation of a graphene ecosystem in the southeastern industry port of Pohang in cooperation with research groups and Graphene Square, to meet the growing demand in the fields of semiconductors, electronics, electric batteries and composites.

POSCO said it has signed a business agreement with Pohang City, the Research Institute of Industrial Science & Technology (RIST), Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH), and Graphene Square, which is developing systems for the mass production of large-scale graphene synthesized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD).

Turkey-based Nanografi opens new graphene production plant

Nanografi logoTurkey-based nanomaterials producer Nanografi recently announced opening a new graphene production plant.

Although specific numbers were not disclosed, the facility, which will reportedly produce graphene at a low cost and at an industrial scale using environmentally friendly methods, is said to become one of the largest in the world thanks to its capacity.

"Flash Graphene" process modified to produce graphene from rubber waste

The “flash” process, introduced by Tour and his colleagues at Rice University in 2020, has now been optimized to convert waste from rubber tires into graphene that can, in turn, be used to strengthen concrete.

Rice scientists optimized a process to turn rubber from discarded tires into turbostratic flash graphene image

The atoms reassemble into valuable turbostratic graphene, which has misaligned layers that are more soluble than graphene produced via exfoliation from graphite. That makes it easier to use in composite materials.

Researchers demonstrate a new technique for mass producing high-quality graphene that allows for real-time monitoring

Researchers from Imperial College London and the University of Birmingham have designed a novel technique for large-scale production of graphene with real-time monitoring. The study provides a viable route for controllable and customizable mass-production which could be adopted for other 2D materials.

New techniques for continuous large-scale production of 2D nanomaterials image

Graphene is currently produced through a variety of methods, roughly divided into bottom-up and top-down approaches. Bottom-up graphene production builds layers atom-by-atom, making a high-quality product but with a drastically time-consuming process. Top-down graphene production is typically much faster and has the potential for large-scale production, but the quality is usually lower. Top-down processes begin with graphite which is split into different layers using a technique known as exfoliation. In this study, the team set out to produce a scalable method for top-down production which would result in a consistently high-quality graphene product.