New method produces graphene by exfoliating graphite with sugars

Scientists in Spain and Italy have developed a new approach for making few-layer graphene using a mechanochemical technique that exfoliates graphite with carbohydrates. This method could pose a "greener" alternative to the common method that involves exfoliating graphite using sonication that requires the use of toxic solvents.

Green method to produce graphene image

A major drawback of using graphene for biological applications is its poor stability in aqueous systems. "Graphene is a strongly hydrophobic material, which aggregates in water and precipitates. To study graphene in biological media, it needs to be dispersed in aqueous solutions, without the use of toxic detergents" explains Ester Vázquez from the University of Castilla-La Mancha, Spain. Now, Vázquez’s team has devised a new environmentally-friendly method for making graphene that could also make it easier to investigate in biological studies.

NanoXplore announces positive feasibility study for its 10,000 metric ton/year graphene production plant

NanoXplore logoCanada-based NanoXplore recently announced a positive feasibility study for its graphene production plant. The company said that the independent feasibility study highlighted several improvement as compared to the project’s preliminary economic assessment (PEA).

NanoXplore is planning to build a 10,000 metric ton/year graphene production plan, which is currently the largest in the world. NanoXplore plans to offer graphene for $10/kg (USD$8/kg) starting from Jan 2020 under the GrapheneBlack brand.

First Graphene and Flinders University form a new company to commercialize VFD technology

First Graphene logo imageFirst Graphene is collaborating with Flinders University to launch 2D Fluidics - a company that will aim to commercialize the Vortex Fluidic Device (VFD). 2D Fluidics is 50% owned by FGR and 50% by Flinders University’s newly named Flinders Institute for NanoScale Science and Technology.

The VFD was invented by the Flinders Institute for NanoScale Science and Technology’s Professor Colin Raston and enables new approaches to producing a wide range of materials such as graphene and sliced carbon nanotubes. The key intellectual property used by 2D Fluidics comprises two patents around the production of carbon nanomaterials, assigned by Flinders University.

New graphene industrial park in China nears completion

The Datong Graphene and Green Technology Industrial Park is reportedly nearing completion. With investment of 10 billion yuan ($1.57 billion USD), it includes a graphene production base, a research and development center, an academic communication and reception center and related companies.

Datong graphene park in China image

The park, built by Datong Moxi Technology, covers an area of 200 hectares and is located in Datong Economic Development Zone. The industrial park is eventually expected to provide jobs for around 7,000 people.

MIT team demonstrates a novel method to mass-produce graphene in long rolls

Researchers at MIT have developed a method that might enable the production of long rolls of high-quality graphene. The continuous manufacturing process can reportedly produce five centimeters of high-quality graphene per minute. The longest run was nearly four hours, and it generated around 10 meters of continuous graphene.

MIT's new graphene production method image

MIT is referring to the development as “the first demonstration of an industrial, scalable method for manufacturing high-quality graphene that is tailored for use in membranes that filter a variety of molecules.” These membranes could be used in biological separation or desalination, for example. The researchers drew from the common industrial roll-to-roll approach blended with chemical vapor deposition, a common graphene-fabrication technique.

Versarien - Think you know graphene? Think again!Versarien - Think you know graphene? Think again!