ZEN Graphene signs Agreement on low cost, high-yield graphene production process

Zen Graphene Solutions logo imageZEN Graphene Solutions has announced the signing of an initial agreement to in-license certain intellectual properties from a Canadian University that when combined with ZEN’s Albany Graphite, produces low cost, environmentally friendly graphene.

The production process rapidly exfoliates Albany Graphite into few layer graphene (FLG, 2-5 layers) with a conversion efficiency of over 90%. Previous work has reportedly demonstrated that the Albany Graphite was converted to graphene far more efficiently when compared to flake or metamorphic graphite. This advantage was said to be confirmed by recent testing using this new process.

Researchers at Queen's University develop a novel, scalable and low-cost process to produce defect-free graphene nanoplatelets

Researchers at Queen’s University in Kingston, Canada have developed a simple yet effective exfoliation process for producing few-layer graphene nanoplatelets (FL-GNPs). Utilizing this one-step, chemical and solvent-free process the researchers were able to convert graphite flakes (+100 mesh, purity >97%) into FL-GNPs at a high yield (90%) and to subsequently form thermoplastic/FL-GNPs composites with improved electrical and mechanical properties.

Queens University FL-Graphene TEM photo TEM image of isolated FL-GNP

The exfoliated graphene nanoplatelets had a high specific surface area (325 m2/g), an aspect ratio above 500 (approximate lateral dimensions of 2µm and thickness of 3.5 nm), and a Raman D/G ratio of 0.3; indicating a structure with few defects. The flexural modulus of polyamide/FL-GNP composites containing 15 volume % FL-GNPs improved from 1850 MPa to 5,080 MPa while the electrical conductivity rose from 5x10-14 S/m to 21 S/m. Surface-coating the FL-GNPs through the addition of a coating agent during the last stages of the exfoliation process rendered the FL-GNPs more hydrophilic, thus, forming stable dispersions in water.

Global Graphene Group launches a graphene-silicon Li-Ion battery anode material

Global Graphene Group, and its subsidiary Angstron Energy (AEC) has developed a new graphene/silicon composite anode material (GCA-II-N) which can increase the capacity of Li-Ion batteries while reducing the battery's size and weight. AEC current market focus is on electronic bikes and consumer electronics, but is also working with Tier-1 electric cars and trucks makers.

Global Graphene Group graphene-silicon anode material
AEC tells us that by wrapping single-layer graphene (or r-GO) around silicon nanoparticles, the volume expansion/contraction of the Silicon during the battery's charge/discharge cycle can be cushioned by the flexibility and mechanical strength of the graphene. The graphene sheets also form a 3D conductive network which ensures good electrical contacts between the Silicon particles and the current collector.

Paragraf starts producing graphene at commercial scale

Paragraf logo imageUniversity of Cambridge spin-out company, Paragraf, recently announced that it started producing graphene at up to eight inches (20cm) in diameter, large enough for commercial electronic devices.

Paragraf is producing graphene ‘wafers’ and graphene-based electronic devices, which could be used in transistors, where graphene-based chips could deliver speeds more than ten times faster than silicon chips; and in chemical and electrical sensors, where graphene could increase sensitivity by a factor of more than 30. The company’s first device will reportedly be available in the next few months.

New method enables synthesizing nanographene on metal oxide surfaces

Researchers from Jagiellonian University in Poland, Oak Ridge National Laboratory in the U.S, Espeem S.A.R.L in Luxembourg and Friedrich Alexander University(FAU) in Germany have designed a method of forming nanographenes on metal oxide surfaces.

 Synthesizing nanographene on metal oxide surfaces image(A) First on-surface synthesis of NG HBC; (B) rational synthesis of GNRs on Au(111); (C) attempts to perform cyclodehydrogenation on a metal oxide surface; (D) first rational on-surface synthesis of NGs on a nonmetallic surface (this work)

The team explains that in order to create an electronic circuit, the molecules of graphene must be synthesized and assembled directly on an insulating or semi-conductive surface. Although metal oxides are the best materials for this purpose, in contrast to metal surfaces, direct synthesis of nanographenes on metal oxide surfaces is not possible as they are considerably less chemically reactive. The researchers would have to carry out the process at high temperatures, which would lead to several uncontrollable secondary reactions. The team has now developed a method for synthesizing nanographenes on non-metallic surfaces, that is insulating surfaces or semi-conductors.

Versarien - Think you know graphene? Think again! Versarien - Think you know graphene? Think again!