Egypt enters MOU with Energy 3 to produce graphene from waste

Egypt's Ministry of Foreign Affairs has signed a memorandum of understanding (MoU) with Energy 3 to build a waste recycling station that produces biofuel and graphene.

The Global Environment Facility had reportedly granted Egypt $8 million to localize electronic and medical waste recycling technology. It had equally granted Egypt $8.1 million to carry out the Sustainable Management of Persistent Organic Pollutants (PoPs) Project.

HydroGraph announces plans for commercial scale production

HydroGraph Clean Power has announced that it is targeting Q3 2022 for commercial scale production at its Manhattan, KS manufacturing plant. To do this, the Company will be leveraging manufacturing technology developed at Kansas State University and kicking off a five-year plant expansion and job creation plan for the Manhattan region.

HydroGraph technology manufactures graphene and other materials, using its technology — the Hyperion detonation system — that is reportedly "ideal for commercial scale: compact and modular, with the small footprint allowing for deployment virtually anywhere". The Company’s initial go-to-market product of graphene, with hydrogen production process in development, marks the beginning for a platform of products in the advanced materials and energy spaces.

Rice team modifies its Flash Graphene process to produce doped graphene

The Rice lab of professor James Tour has modified its flash Joule heating process to produce doped graphene that tailors the material’s properties for optical and electronic devices.

Heteroatom-Doped Flash Graphene process image

The modified process shows how graphene can be doped with a single element or with pairs or trios of elements. The process was demonstrated with single elements boron, nitrogen, oxygen, phosphorus and sulfur, a two-element combination of boron and nitrogen, and a three-element mix of boron, nitrogen and sulfur.

Researchers use carbon monoxide to synthesize high-quality graphene

A team of international researchers, including ones from Skoltech, MIPT, the RAS Institute of Solid State Physics and Aalto University, have proposed a unique graphene synthesis technique that utilizes carbon monoxide as the carbon source.

The technique is said to be a fast and cheap way to produce high-quality graphene with relatively simple equipment for use in electronic circuits, gas sensors, optics, and more.