MIT and Lamborghini to develop graphene-enhanced supercar

Update: MIT Professor states that these supercapacitors will NOT be graphene-based!

Lamborghini and MIT have announced a collaboration on a 3-year project to develop a graphene-enhanced supercapacitor electric vehicle. The Lamborghini-MIT partnership could, however, end up being extended as there is no target date for the car’s completion.

MIT and Lamborghini develop graphene-enhanced supercar image

The planned graphene-enhanced Terzo Millennio ("third millennium") supercar may be a real gamechanger. This concept car is to be a fully electric, supercapacitor-powered automobile that can be charged in minutes – with no bulky battery. It will reportedly be "covered in a sheet of graphene", but this description does not sound extremely accurate... We will have to wait for further information on this project.

MIT and Johns Hopkins team manages to make graphene self-fold into 3D shapes

Researchers with Johns Hopkins University and MIT have shown a way to cause flat sheets of graphene to self-fold into 3D geometric shapes. The group explains how they prepared the sheets and then used heat to cause them to fold. The ability to create 3D objects from sheets of graphene can advance opportunities in fields like sensors, wearables and more.

Graphene can be folded into 3D shapes image

In their work, the researchers developed a micro-patterning technique that leads to the flat graphene sheets bending along predesignated lines when heat is applied, causing the sheet to form into shapes. The new method not only preserves the intrinsic properties of the graphene, but it was also found that the creases can cause a band gap in the graphene, which can be extremely useful.

Nanotech Engineering's graphene-enhanced solar panel gains MIT's approval

Nanotech engineering logo imageNanotech Engineering announced that MIT (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) has verified the technology of its new Nanopanel, a solar panel that is declared as 92% efficient (as opposed to around 20% for traditional large panels).

Nanotech Engineering's Nanopanel is described as a solar panel with layers of Graphene as the base, a carbon nanotube forest on top with a mineral solution that can come in any color to match the home. “The panel is slightly thicker and wider than a FedEx envelope, yet stronger than steel, flexible, lightweight, flexible and about half the cost of traditional panels,” said Nanotech.

Graphene enables detection of single photons

A team of researchers led by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Raytheon BBN Technologies developed a new device that can detect single photons across a wide range of the electromagnetic spectrum, from the higher energy visible to much lower energy radio frequencies. The device consists of a sheet of graphene contacted on two ends by superconductors - a configuration called a Josephson junction.

Graphene-based single photon detector image

The ability to detect terahertz and microwave photons in this way could allow for observations of some of the faintest objects in the universe, say the researchers who report on the new technique, “as well as open up new opportunities in quantum information processing.”

MIT team creates flexible, transparent solar cells with graphene electrodes

Researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) have developed flexible and transparent graphene-based solar cells, which can be mounted on various surfaces ranging from glass to plastic to paper and tape. The graphene devices exhibited optical transmittance of 61% across the whole visible regime and up to 69% at 550 nanometers. The power conversion efficiency of the graphene solar cells ranged from 2.8% to 4.1%.

MIT team's flexible, transparent solar cell with graphene electrodes image

A common challenge in making transparent solar cells with graphene is getting the two electrodes to stick together and to the substrate, as well as ensuring that electrons only flow out of one of the graphene layers. Using heat or glue can damage the material and reduce its conductivity, so the MIT team developed a new technique to tackle this issue. Rather than applying an adhesive between the graphene and the substrate, they sprayed a thin layer of ethylene-vinyl acetate (EVA) over the top, sticking them together like tape instead of glue.

Versarien - Think you know graphene? Think again!Versarien - Think you know graphene? Think again!