Dotz Nano shows graphene quantum dots to be effective in treating brain injuries, strokes and heart attacks

Dotz Nano has shared a new research that finds its graphene quantum dots (GQDs) technology effective in treating brain injuries, strokes, multiple sclerosis and heart attacks. According to the company, the study demonstrated that these dots, manufactured from coal, can assist in fighting oxidative stress to assist in treating patients suffering from the serious conditions.

Led by the Company's scientific advisor, Professor James Tour, the study was conducted by five universities and research facilities including Rice University, with the findings covered by multiple medical publications.

Rice team creates laser-induced graphene nanogenerators that turn movement into energy

Rice University researchers have recently taken the idea of wearable devices that harvest energy from movement to a new level. Prof. James Tour's lab has adapted laser-induced graphene (LIG) into small, metal-free devices that generate electricity.

Putting the LIG composites in contact with other surfaces produces static electricity that can be used to power devices. This relies on the triboelectric effect, by which materials gather a charge through contact. When they are put together and then pulled apart, surface charges build up that can be channeled toward power generation.

Graphene quantum dots could yield an effective antioxidant for various traumatic injuries

Researchers from Rice University, the Texas A&M Health Science Center and the McGovern Medical School at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) have found that graphene quantum dots drawn from common coal may be the basis for an effective antioxidant for people who suffer traumatic brain injuries, strokes or heart attacks.

Graphene quantum dots could yield an effective antioxidant for various traumatic injuries imageCoal-derived graphene quantum dots as seen under an electron microscope

The QDs' ability to quench oxidative stress after such injuries was the subject of a study, which showed that the biocompatible dots, when modified with a common polymer, are effective mimics of the body’s own superoxide dismutase, one of many natural enzymes that keep oxidative stress in check.

Graphene-based foam maintains texture at extreme temperatures

Researchers from Nankai University in China and Rice University in the U.S. have developed a type of graphene-based foam that retains its texture when exposed to extremely cold temperatures.

Graphene foam maintains texture at extreme temperatures imageStructure of the 3D graphene foam

The researchers note that almost all materials become more brittle and stiffer when exposed to very cold temperatures, often leading to loss of strength. In this new work, the researchers sought to find a material that would spring back after being crushed while exposed to extreme temperatures. To that end, they turned to graphene as a possible solution.

Rice and BGU present a range of exciting new graphene-enhanced composite materials

The labs of Rice University chemist James Tour and Christopher Arnusch, a professor at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev in Israel, introduced a batch of graphene-enhanced composites that can be a step towards more robust packages.

Rice and BGU present a range of exciting new graphene-enhanced composite materials

By infusing laser-induced graphene with plastic, rubber, cement, wax or other materials, the lab made composites with a wide range of possible applications. These new composites could be used in wearable electronics, in heat therapy, in water treatment, in anti-icing and deicing work, in creating antimicrobial surfaces and even in making resistive random-access memory devices.

Versarien - Think you know graphene? Think again! Versarien - Think you know graphene? Think again!