Researchers design graphene nanocomposite temperature alarm sensor

Researchers from The University of Manchester and Hubei University have integrated the electrical conductivity of graphene and the insulation of nitrocellulose to prepare a fire alarm sensor.

Researchers design graphene/nitrocellulose composite alarm image

The graphene/nitrocellulose membrane remains electrically insulated in normal condition, but instantly turns conductive at high temperatures: Upon encountering flames, nitrocellulose decomposes rapidly as a reaction to the high temperature and induces a distinct transition in its electrical resistance, causing the transformation process of the alarm sensor from being electrically insulated to an electron conductive state.

Versarien to provide graphene-enhanced elastomers to Flux Footwear

Versarien has announced a collaboration with US-based Flux Footwear to supply graphene-enhanced elastomers for an improved model of Flux’s ‘Adapt’ shoe. The elastomers are to be used in an improved model of flux's 'Adapt' model.

The elastomer technology has been developed by Versarien’s in-house technology teams at the University of Manchester and University of Cambridge as part of the GSCALE project and has the potential for multiple elastomer applications.

First Graphene and partners secure UK grant to develop graphene-enhanced cement

First Graphene-led consortium of partners has been awarded a UK Government grant to develop high performance graphene-enhanced cement.

The grant of A$360,206 (around USD$258,500) – was awarded by the UK Government’s innovation agency, Innovate UK to the consortium, which includes construction materials group Breedon Cement Ltd, construction and regeneration group Morgan Sindall Construction & Infrastructure Ltd, and the University of Manchester’s Department of Mechanical, Civil and Aerospace Engineering.

Graphene assists in observing the elusive Schwinger effect

Researchers at The University of Manchester, MIT and other international collaborators have succeeded in observing the so-called Schwinger effect, an elusive process that normally occurs only in cosmic events. By applying high currents through specially designed graphene-based devices, the team - based at the National Graphene Institute - succeeded in producing particle-antiparticle pairs from a vacuum.

A vacuum is assumed to be completely empty space, without any matter or elementary particles. However, it was predicted by Nobel laureate Julian Schwinger 70 years ago that intense electric or magnetic fields can break down the vacuum and spontaneously create elementary particles.

India’s first graphene innovation center to be established in Kerala

It was recently reported that India’s first innovation center for graphene will be set up in Kerala by the Digital University Kerala (DUK), along with Centre for Materials for Electronics Technology (C-MET) in Thrissur, for an investment of Rs 86.41 crore (over USD$11.5 million). Tata Steel Limited is set to be the industrial partner of the center.

The chief investigators of the project, who will also lead it are Dr. AP James of DUK and Dr. A Seema of C-MET. The main collaborators include scientists from the National Graphene Institute, University of Manchester, and other industrial partners from around the world.