University of Manchester team discovers a new family of quasiparticles in graphene-based superlattices

Researchers at The University of Manchester, led by Sir Andre Geim and Dr Alexey Berdyugin, have discovered and characterized a new family of quasiparticles named 'Brown-Zak fermions' in graphene-based superlattices. This was achieved by aligning the atomic lattice of a graphene layer to that of an insulating boron nitride sheet, dramatically changing the properties of the graphene sheet.

The study follows years of successive advances in graphene-boron nitride superlattices which has previously allowed the observation of a fractal pattern known as the Hofstadter's butterfly - and now, with this current work, the researchers report another highly surprising behavior of particles in such structures under applied magnetic field.

University of Manchester team develops graphene-based antibody test for detection of kidney disease

An interdisciplinary team of researchers from The University of Manchester have developed a new graphene-based testing system for disease-related antibodies, initially targeting a kidney disease called Membranous Nephropathy.

U of Manchester team develops graphene-based sensor for kidney diseases image

The new instrument, based on the principle of a quartz-crystal microbalance (QCM) combined with a graphene-based bio-interface, is said to offer a cheap, fast, simple and sensitive alternative to currently available antibody tests.

What's new at Manchester University's GEIC? James Baker, CEO, gives us an update

In December 2018, Manchester University’s Graphene Engineering Innovation Center (GEIC) first opened, aiming to accelerate the commercial impact of graphene and help realize its potential to revolutionize many sectors.

James Baker, Manchester University

James Baker, the CEO at Graphene@Manchester (G@M) who's responsible for the development and delivery of the business strategy which includes the National Graphene Institute (NGI) and the GEIC, kindly agreed to answer a few questions we had and update us on the latest from the GEIC.

SpaceBlue launches graphene-enhanced flooring product called SpaceMat

SpaceBlue, a UK-based start-up company, has launched the first of a range of products aimed at reducing wastage from vehicle tires, supported by the Graphene Engineering Innovation Center's (GEIC) ERDF Bridging the Gap program at The University of Manchester.

Graphene's answer to recycling tire rubber launches to market imageCredit: University of Manchester

In conjunction with the GEIC, Dr. Vivek Koncherry developed SpaceMat—a flooring product that uses graphene to improve the performance of recycled tire rubber compared to previous efforts.

Graphene additives show a new way to control the structure of organic crystals

A research team at the University of Manchester has shown that by tuning the surface properties of graphene, it is possible to change the type of polymorphs produced. Glycine, the simplest amino acid, has been used as reference molecule, while different types of graphene have been used either as additive or as templates.

Matthew Boyes and Adriana Alieva, PhD students at The University of Manchester, both contributed to this work: “This is a pioneering work on the use of graphene as an additive in crystallization experiments. We have used different types of graphene with varying oxygen content and looked at their effects on the crystal outcome of glycine. We have observed that by carefully tuning the oxygen content of graphene, it is possible to induce preferential crystallisation”, said Adriana.