Team at Australia's RMIT finds silicon contamination of graphene as a hindrance to commercial adoption

Researchers at Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology (RMIT) have found that graphene could better fulfill its potential when purified to remove silicon, doubling its electrical performance.

Despite researchers demonstrating countless possible applications of graphene, many people feel that graphene is thus far showing rather sluggish industrial adoption. Now, researchers based at RMIT have proposed a possible reason for this and suggested how graphene's full potential could be unlocked.

New graphene-based sensor could improve food safety and detect gases and chemicals

researchers from Jiliang University and Zhejiang University of Technology in China, along with researchers at the Technical University of Denmark, have devised a new design for a graphene-based sensor that can simultaneously detect multiple substances - including dangerous bacteria and other pathogens. In addition to food safety, the new design could improve detection of gases and chemicals for a wide range of applications.

New graphene-based sensor could improve food safety and detect gases and chemicals image

"Our design is based on graphene sheets, which are two-dimensional crystals of carbon just one atom thick," said research team member Bing-Gang Xiao, from China Jiliang University. "The sensor is not only highly sensitive but can also be easily adjusted to detect different substances."

Exeter team designs graphene e-fibers with touch-sensing and light-emitting functionalities for smart textiles

An international team of scientists, led by Professor Monica Craciun from the University of Exeter's Engineering department, has reported a new technique to create fully electronic fibers that can be incorporated into the production of everyday clothing. The researchers believe that the discovery could revolutionize the creation of wearable electronic devices for use in a range of every day applications, as well as health monitoring, such as heart rates and blood pressure, and medical diagnostics.

Graphene-sensors-in-textiles-by-Exeter-image

Currently, wearable electronics are achieved by essentially gluing devices to fabrics, which can often mean they are too rigid and susceptible to malfunctioning. The new research avoids this by integrating the electronic devices into the fabric of the material, by coating electronic fibers with light-weight, durable components that will allow images to be shown directly on the fabric.

Mitsubishi Electric is developing graphene-based super-wideband image sensor

The Advanced Technology R&D Center of Mitsubishi Electric Corp. is reportedly developing a graphene-enhanced image sensor that can sense a wide frequency band of light from visible light to terahertz waves with one device.

Mitsubishi Electric is developing graphene-based super-wideband Image sensor  image

It is said to be a multi-spectrum image sensor with a lower cost and higher performance, compared with existing multi-spectrum image sensors. Currently, multiple kinds of image sensors are combined in accordance with wavelength to realize a multi-spectrum image sensor, and high-cost materials and liquid nitrogen-based cooling are necessary to detect lights other than visible light.

GEIC to join Haydale's collaboration to develop graphene enhanced failsafe locking solution

Haydale logoIn February 2018, Haydale, the University of Swansea and Wheelsure entered a collaboration to develop intelligent systems for transport and industrial applications using Haydale's graphene ink sensor technology, in order to extend Wheelsure's product range. Now, Haydale has confirmed that The University of Manchester's Graphene Engineering Innovation Centre ("GEIC") is set to join this collaboration.

The project aims to develop an intelligent new product pairing Haydale's functionalized graphene sensor technology with Wheelsure's failsafe locking solution. The sensor will be developed by applications engineers at the GEIC using Haydale's functionalised graphene. The project is expected to be showcased at the official opening of the GEIC in December 2018.

Versarien - Think you know graphene? Think again! Versarien - Think you know graphene? Think again!