Log 9 Materials displays a car that can run on water and air, thanks to a graphene-enhanced battery

Log 9 Materials, an IIT Roorkee spin-off that focuses on graphene material production and application development, has recently exhibited a car named Ranger that runs on air and water at India-UK Future Tech event in India.

Log 9 Materials displays a car that can run on water and air, thanks to a graphene-enhanced battery image

Log 9 Materials has reportedly developed a metal-air battery made up of aluminium and water, which will make the eclectic vehicles reduce the burden of charging and petrol prices. The graphene-enhanced battery would only require the users to change aluminium from the battery after every 1000kms.

Zenyatta provides updates on fund-raising and graphene applications progress

Zenyatta logoZenyatta Ventures has announced its plans to raise up to $3,000,000 CAD (around $2,240,000 USD) on a non-brokered private placement basis. The proceeds will be used for bulk sampling, environmental assessment and community engagement.

Zentayya also provided an update on its graphene market development work ,which has led to the creation of five significant potential market verticals for the Company which include aerospace, biomedical, water treatment, transportation and civil engineering.

Linköping researchers make progress in using graphene to make fuel from water and carbon dioxide

Researchers at Linköping University (LiU) in Sweden are working to develop a method to convert water and carbon dioxide to the renewable energy of the future, using the energy from the sun and graphene applied to the surface of cubic silicon carbide.

The LiU research group recently reported an important step towards achieving this goal, and developed a method that makes it possible to produce graphene with several layers in a tightly controlled process. They have also shown that graphene acts as a superconductor in certain conditions.

Researchers find the exact balance in which graphene coatings can promote hydrogen evolution reaction

A collaboration led by the University of Tsukuba has recently optimized an approach to increase the stability of catalysts used in the hydrogen evolution reaction without significantly sacrificing activity. The team found that coating catalyst nanoparticles with an optimal number of layers of graphene raised nanoparticle durability while allowing the nanoparticles to retain their catalytic activity. The study was reported in ACS Energy Letters.

"We optimized the balance between the number of graphene layers coating the nanoparticles and their catalytic activity," study first author Kailong Hu says. "To do this, we had to precisely control the number of graphene layers coating the nanoparticles, which we achieved by carefully regulating the deposition time of graphene on the nanoparticles."

Japanese team designs a graphene-based electrode that can produce hydrogen under acidic conditions

Researchers at the Japanese Tsukuba University described a graphene-based electrode that can produce hydrogen under acidic conditions. The electrolysis of water to generate hydrogen is vital for energy storage in a green economy. One of the major obstacles, however, is the high cost of noble-metal electrodes. Cheaper non-noble electrodes function well in driving the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER), but mainly in alkaline conditions, where the reaction is electricity-hungry. The more efficient acid-phase reaction requires precious metals such as platinum. Worse still, the acid electrolytes are corrosive and eat away at the core metal.

Perforated graphene for hydrogen production image

The researchers have found that holey graphene offers a way around this problem. They used nitrogen-doped graphene sheets to encapsulate a nickel–molybdenum (NiMo) electrode alloy. The graphene was punched full of nanometer-size holes. The researchers showed that in acid conditions, their HER system dramatically outperforms an electrode using regular non-holey graphene. The use of graphene in HER electrodes is not new—this flexible, conductive carbon sheet is ideal for wrapping around the core metal. However, although it protects the metal against corrosion, graphene also suppresses its chemical activity. In the Tsukuba system, the holes promote the reaction in two ways, while the intact graphene part protects the metal.