End-to-end processing chain of 2D materials successfully demonstrated as part of project "HEA2D"

Project "HEA2D", which started in 2016 and set out to investigate the production, qualities, and applications of 2D nanomaterials, recently demonstrated end-to-end processing chain of two-dimensional nanomaterials. The project is a collaboration between AIXTRON, AMO, Coatema, Fraunhofer and Kunststoff-Institut für die mittelständische Wirtschaft (K.I.M.W.).

It was stated that the "HEA2D" consortium successfully demonstrated an end-to-end processing chain of two-dimensional nanomaterials as part of its results. 2D materials integrated into mass production processes have the potential to create integrated and systemic product and production solutions that are socially, economically and ecologically sustainable. Application areas for the technologies developed and materials investigated in this project are mainly composite materials and coatings, highly sensitive sensors, power generation and storage, electronics, information and communication technologies as well as photonics and quantum technologies.

Paragraf raises USD$16 million to push forward graphene-based electronics technologies

Paragraf logo imageUK-based graphene technology company Paragraf has announced the close of its £12.8 million (over $16 million USD ) Series A round led by Parkwalk. The round also included investment from IQ Capital Partners, Amadeus Capital Partners and Cambridge Enterprise, the commercialization arm of the University of Cambridge, as well as several angel investors. The funding will aim to see Paragraf’s first graphene-based electronics products reach the market, transitioning the company into a commercial, revenue-generating entity.

Paragraf sets out to deliver IP-protected graphene technology using standard, mass production scale manufacturing approaches, enabling step-change performance enhancements to today’s electronic devices. The company’s first sensor products have reportedly demonstrated order of magnitude operational improvements over today’s incumbents. Achieving large-scale, graphene-based production technology may enable next generation electronics, including vastly increased computing speeds, significantly improved medical diagnostics and higher efficiency renewable energy generation as well as currently unachievable products such as instant charging batteries and very low power, flexible electronics.

Researchers discover new states of matter that arise from stacking 2D layers of graphene

Researchers from Brown and Columbia Universities in the U.S have demonstrated that unknown states of matter arise from stacking two-dimensional layers of graphene together. These new states have been named the fractional quantum Hall effect (FQHE), and are created through the complex interactions of electrons within and across graphene layers.

"In terms of materials engineering, this work shows that these layered systems could be viable in creating new types of electronic devices that take advantage of these new quantum Hall states," said Jia Li, assistant professor at Brown. Li added: "The findings show that stacking 2-D materials together in close proximity generates entirely new physics."

San Diego team creates LIG graphene composites for printed, stretchable wearables

Researchers at Joseph Wang's Laboratory for Nanobioelectronics at UC San Diego demonstrated the synthesis of high-performance stretchable graphene ink using a facile, scalable, and low-cost laser induction method for the synthesis of the graphene component.

The processing steps for screen-printed flexible supercapacitor fabricated from laser-induced graphene ink imageThe processing steps for screen-printed flexible supercapacitor fabricated from laser-induced graphene ink

As a proof-of-concept, the researchers fabricated a stretchable micro-supercapacitor (S-MSC) demonstrating high capacitance. This is said to be the first example of using laser-induced graphene in the form of a powder preparation of graphene-based inks and subsequently for use in screen-printing of S-MSC.

Understanding graphene/GaN and other 2D/3D interfaces by UV illumination could be crucial for next-gen electronics

Researchers from the Nagoya Institute of Technology (NITech) in Japan have developed a method to examine the connections between two-dimensional layers of atoms and semiconductors, which could prove useful in the future for ensuring the performance of next-gen electronics.

The fabrication process of vertical Schottky junction with monolayer graphene on free-standing GaN imageThe fabrication process of a monolayer graphene on free-standing GaN interface

The team applied a layer of graphene to gallium nitride, a commonly used semiconductor. The graphene is made of a single layer of atoms, while the gallium nitride is a three-dimensional structure. Together, graphene and gallium nitride are known as a heterojunction device, with significant sensitivity to the interface properties of metal and semiconductors.