Membranes

Researchers design lightweight and ultra-compact graphene-based filters that can block even miniature nanoparticles

Scientists from Vanderbilt University recently developed a lightweight and ultra-compact graphene-based filter that can block aerosolized nanoparticles of size in the sub-20 nm range. 

Nanoparticulate aerosols contain toxins, pollutants, and harmful viruses, whose size varies between 20 and 300 nm in diameter. Although conventional air filters, such as 95% efficiency filter (N95) and the high-efficiency particulate air filter (HEPA), exhibit superior air flow rates, they are unable to inhibit nanoparticulate aerosols whose size is less than 300 nm. Facemasks that can block nanoparticulate aerosols of size below 300 nm are bulky and develop thermal stress due to low breathability. To improve the applicability of PPEs, several strategies are implemented that focus on making porous polymers, with greater thickness, which can filter out nanoparticulate aerosol toxins, pathogens, and pollutants.

Read the full story Posted: Sep 02,2022

UCL team designs efficient graphene nanomesh filtration membranes inspired by cell walls

Researchers from University College London have demonstrated a graphene nanomesh membrane that possesses high hydrophilicity, super-oleophobicity and low oil adhesion underwater.

The researchers in this work have put a nature-inspired spin on the fabrication of high-performance graphene membranes for tricky oil/water separations even in stable emulsions. They demonstrated graphene nanomesh membranes within a wide pH range at impressive water permeance (close to 4000 L m2 h1 bar1) under a very low trans-membrane pressure difference.

Read the full story Posted: Jun 03,2022

Watercycle Technologies secures funding for its graphene-based membrane tech

Watercycle Technologies, a spin-out company from The University of Manchester, has secured initial funding for its technology that uses graphene-based membranes and systems to extract lithium and other minerals from brines and water solutions.

Led by Sebastian Leaper, a former PhD student from the Department of Materials at Manchester, Watercycle Technologies has taken Tier 2 membership of the Graphene Engineering Innovation Centre (GEIC), with lab space and access to advanced 2D materials facilities and expertise in prototyping.

Read the full story Posted: May 29,2022

China-based researchers design new method to pre-enrich uranium in seawater using graphene oxide

Researchers at the Institute of Modern Physics (IMP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), in collaboration with teams from China's Lanzhou University and Hebei University, have developed a graphene oxide-based method of pre-enriching uranium in seawater by membrane filtration.

GO to help enrich Uranium in seawater image

In their study, the scientists fabricated a new type of glycine cross-linked composite graphene oxide (GO-Gly) membrane with good ion sieving properties, which can meet the demands of uranium pre-enrichment in seawater.

Read the full story Posted: May 26,2022

Graphene helps track the nanomotion of bacteria

A team of researchers from TU Delft, led by dr. Farbod Alijani, recently managed to capture the low-level noise of a single bacterium using graphene.

Being able to pick up on the miniscule sounds of bacteria can help track if an antibiotics is working, or if the bacteria are resistant to the antibiotic. Alijani's team was originally looking into the fundamentals of the mechanics of graphene, but at a certain point they wondered what would happen if it comes into contact with a single biological object.

Read the full story Posted: Apr 24,2022

NematiQ announces commercial-scale graphene membrane milestone achievement

NematiQ, an Australia-based developer of graphene oxide (GO) membranes for water treatment applications, has reported commercial-scale manufacture of an innovative graphene membrane.

Over the last five years, NematiQ has developed a patented, layer-by-layer methodology to produce the graphene membrane. NematiQ has achieved a milestone by producing more than 1,000 meters worth of 1,000-millimetre-wide flat sheet graphene membrane, at speed, on an industrial roll-to-roll coating machine, showcasing its ability to manufacture graphene membrane at a commercial scale.

Read the full story Posted: Mar 14,2022

Researchers achieve precision sieving of gases through atomic pores in graphene

A team of researchers, led by Professor Sir Andre Geim at The University of Manchester, in collaboration with scientists from Belgium and China, used low-energy electrons to make individual atomic-scale holes in suspended graphene. The holes came in sizes down to about two angstroms, smaller than even the smallest atoms like helium and hydrogen.

Exponentially selective molecular sieving through angstrom pores image

The researchers report that they achieved practically perfect selectivity (better than 99.9%) for such gases as helium or hydrogen with respect to nitrogen, methane or xenon. Also, air molecules (oxygen and nitrogen) pass through the pores easily relative to carbon dioxide, which is >95% captured.

Read the full story Posted: Dec 09,2021

Researchers use AI to develop efficient water desalination based on graphene nanopores

Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have recently refined the water desalination process, with graphene nanopores obtained using artificial intelligence.

"The ions are so tiny, and if you want to remove them, you need to either boil, evaporate, and condense the water, or push it through membranes full of very tiny pores," explained Barati Farimani, an assistant professor of mechanical engineering at Carnegie Mellon University. The current desalination and separation process is very energy and time inefficient. To combat this, Barati Farimani and his team have used artificial intelligence (AI) agents to design an improved method in a week that would likely take decades. "Ideally," he explained, "the best membrane should be one atom thick, such as graphene, a single-layer sheet."

Read the full story Posted: Oct 29,2021

ESC and Evercloak to collaborate on project to build pilot-scale commercial production of graphene-based membranes

Environmental Systems Corporation (ESC) and Evercloak have announced a new CAD$4.6 million (around USD$3.64 million) collaborative project to build up to pilot-scale commercial production of graphene-based membranes. The project will be funded by Next Generation Manufacturing Canada (NGen) from the Ministry of Innovation, Science, and Economic Development Canada.

"This is a very exciting time for us. This collaboration represents a crucial building block towards net-zero by the year 2030 by reducing energy processes for cleanrooms. We are very excited to work with Evercloak and NGen on this initiative," said Vern Solomon, Founder/ Innovator of ESC.

Read the full story Posted: Aug 18,2021