Graphene-enhanced smart textiles developed for heat adaptive clothing

New research at the University of Manchester's National Graphene Institute focuses on graphene-enhanced smart adaptive clothing which can lower the body temperature of the wearer in hot climates.

Graphene smart adaptive clothing can lower the body temperature of the wearer in hot climates image

The team of scientists has created a prototype garment to demonstrate dynamic thermal radiation control within a piece of clothing by utilizing the remarkable thermal properties and flexibility of graphene. The development also opens the door to new applications such as, interactive infrared displays and covert infrared communication on textiles.

Zen Graphene Solutions and Graphene Composites collaborate on graphene ink on fabrics for Coronavirus protection

Zen Graphene Solutions logo imageGraphene Composites logo imageZEN Graphene Solutions has announced an international collaboration with UK-based Graphene Composites to fight COVID-19 by developing a potential virucidal graphene-based composite ink that can be applied to fabrics including N95 face masks and other personal protective equipment (PPE) for significantly increased protection. Once the development, testing, and confirmation of the graphene ink's virucidal ability have been completed, the ink will then be incorporated into fabrics used for PPE.

Francis Dubé, CEO of ZEN commented, "We are pleased to be collaborating with GC and be on the forefront of a new innovative technology that could contribute to combating the deadly COVID-19 virus. The development of this potential COVID-19 virucidal graphene ink is coming at a crucial time to provide effective PPE supplies for the safety of frontline workers and hospital staff." Dr. Dubé continued, "The current N95 masks trap the virus but don't kill it. Our testing will demonstrate if the graphene ink is an effective virucide which would kill the virus as this could make a big difference to people's safety. We have been very impressed by the Graphene Composites team and look forward to continued collaborations."

Lasers enable graphene-on-kevlar textiles for smart protective clothing

Researchers at Tsinghua University have used lasers to make graphene on Kevlar textiles, creating protective clothing that can record the wearer’s electrocardiogram (ECG) or sense a toxic gas.

Lasers make graphene on kevlar textiles imagePrototype of an intelligent protective vest based on the Kevlar-laser induced graphene textile (left) with a gas sensor and battery embedded in a design on the vest (top right) also shown in false color (bottom right). Credit: ACS Nano

Yingying Zhang and colleagues at Tsinghua University used a carbon dioxide laser to write on Kevlar, a synthetic polyamide fiber generally used to make body armor and personal protective clothing. The laser burned and depolymerized the Kevlar fibers and the carbon atoms recombined to form graphene, as shown by Raman spectroscopy. Using a motorized setup for the laser, they were able to scribe any design on the textile in minutes.

Haydale and Welsh Centre for Printing and Coatings secure English Institute for Sport contract

Haydale Haydale logohas announced that it will now collaborate with the English Institute for Sport (EIS) and the Welsh Centre for Printing and Coating (WCPC) to deliver a range of advanced wearable technology sport apparel for elite athletes.

Haydale has reported that initial prototype testing has been completed in live performance sessions with elite athletes with very successful results for wearability through its unique coating systems. Alongside supply chain partners, a range of garments are being manufactured in higher quantities for further use in elite sport settings, focusing on efforts to develop flexible and miniaturized electronics. This enhances product feel as well as reducing weight, allowing for optimized athlete performance.

Thomas Swan and GEIC develop graphene fibre

Thomas SwanThomas Swan logo recently announced that the Graphene Engineering Innovation Centre (GEIC) in Manchester has produced a fibre using Polyamide 6 and 0.2% loading of Thomas Swan Graphene Nanoplatelets (GNP’s).

GEIC successfully extruded and subsequently spun 1.5km of the fibre with 0.39mm diameter. This was said to bode well for continuing Thomas Swan's development of graphene in nanocomposites. Typical applications for this type of monofibre include carbon brushes for motors, seat belts or fishing lines.