Reebok announces a new clothing line enhanced with graphene

Reebok launched a new apparel collection, called Thermowarm+Graphene, that uses graphene to help retain heat. Reebok says that by printing graphene on the internal side of the clothing, it helps to retain between 8% and 15% more heat than areas without graphene (that depends on the base fabric the graphene is printed on).

Reebok Thermowarm+Graphene cotton fleece hoodie photo

The new collection includes hoodies, jackets and pants. The collection is now available globally on Reebok's online store, with prices ranging from $70 to $140 USD. Reebok plans to release more options in the collection in the future.

Graphene-enhanced bedsheets run a successful crowdfunding campaign

EDASI, developed of graphene-enhanced bed-sheets is running a crowdfunding campaign to support its product launch. The campaign is very successful, having raised over $275,000 as of the time of writing (with 8 days to go).

EDASI BioGraphene Bedding Sheets photo

The company says that its graphene-enhanced fibers offer excellent thermal regulation and that its graphene fights bacteria and repels dust mite.

Directa Plus' graphene coatings used in two collections displayed at the Milan Design Week

Directa Plus has announced that its new G+ graphene coatings are being used in two collections at the Milan Design Week. During the event, designers, architects, creatives, producers and brands in furniture and upholstery and interior design show their new products and creations.

The graphene product is being displayed by two Italian companies: Plinio il Giovane, a central Milan based producer of high-end furniture and upholstery, and Danese Milano, a subsidiary of lighting company Artemide. The G+ coating has been used for Plinio il Giovane’s chairs and sofas and Danese Milano’s desk pad.

Haydale's graphene inks used in garments worn by British athletes at the Tokyo Olympic Games

Haydale has announced that, following its announcement of positive prototype testing on 3rd March 2020, its range of advanced wearable technology - integrated into garments for elite athletes - was used in Tokyo by British athletes, including top medal winning athletes.

The garments generate heat using Haydale's printed functionalized graphene ink and incorporate electronic circuitry to produce temperature regulated panels. The plan is to use them at future international competitions, and subsequently to make them available commercially to other professional sports.

Graphene-based sensor can help detect when firefighters’ protective clothing is no longer safe

A University of Alberta researcher is working with Canada-based Davey Textile Solutions and other industry partners to reduce the risk of faulty protective gear used by firefighters, with a graphene-based sensor that can detect the gradual breakdown in garments from exposure to heat, moisture and ultraviolet (UV) light.

“These fibers age silently and lose their performance, so this sensor technology is a breakthrough in terms of safety for workers exposed to heat and flame,” said clothing and textiles scientist Patricia Dolez, the project’s lead researcher and an assistant professor in the U of A Faculty of Agricultural, Life & Environmental Sciences (ALES).