Transistors

Graphenea takes part in effort to achieve ultrasensitive detection of SARS-CoV-2 spike protein using graphene field-effect transistors

Researchers from Graphenea, Ikerbasque, BCMaterials, Center for Cooperative Research in Biomaterials (CIC biomaGUNE) of the Basque Research and Technology Alliance (BRTA), University of the Basque Country UPV-EHU, University of Trieste and Universidade da Coruña recently reported a graphene field effect transistors (GFET) array biosensor for the detection of SARS-CoV-2 spike protein, using the human membrane protein involved in the virus internalisation: angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2).

By finely controlling the graphene functionalization, by tuning the Debye length, and by deeply characterizing the ACE2-spike protein interactions, the team managed to detect the target protein with an extremely low limit of detection (2.94 aM).

Read the full story Posted: Jan 30,2023

Graphenea expands its mGFET product line with an integrated reservoir for biosensing in liquid

Graphenea recently upgraded its mGFET line of products with a built-in reservoir for liquids. This enhancement increases ease of use for biosensing and implementation in clinical testing and rapid screening.

The mGFET product line is designed to minimize barriers to adoption of graphene as a biosensor. The product was launched at the same time as the Graphenea Card, a socket for housing the mGFET and interfacing with measurement electronics. The addition of the built-in reservoir lets the user focus on the biochemistry, without worrying about producing the graphene or the sensor, or about interfacing.

Read the full story Posted: Jan 11,2023

Graphene transistor enables high-speed, high-sensitivity terahertz detection

Researchers from Japan's Tohoku University and RIKEN have successfully detected terahertz waves with fast response and high sensitivity at room temperature. 

On the electromagnetic spectrum, which comprises everything from radio waves to X-rays and gamma rays, there is a deadzone where conventional electronic devices can hardly operate. This deadzone is occupied by terahertz waves. With wavelengths of approximately 10 micrometers to 1 millimeter, terahertz waves are unique amongst electromagnetic waves. Their vibration frequency overlaps with the molecules that make up matter, and they allow for the detection of substances, since almost every molecule operating in the terahertz band has a fingerprint spectrum. Technologies capable of harnessing the power of terahertz waves could have massive significance for the development of spectroscopy, imaging, and 6G and 7G technologies.

Read the full story Posted: Dec 17,2022

Graphenea reports excellent market reaction to its mGFET devices

In June 2022, Graphenea launched its latest product out of its Graphene Foundry, the mGFET, fully-packaged mini graphene-based field effect transistors.

Graphenea now updates that the market demand for these products has been excellent, and it has run out of stock. The company is now working to produce more mGFET devices and restock.

The mGFETs are Graphenea's highest value-chain products, which are manufactured and packaged in chip carriers, and can be used together with the Graphenea Card for seamless sensor development (which was released earlier in 2022, and has also seen very good reception in the industry).

Read the full story Posted: Nov 30,2022

Archer Materials announces wettable graphene transistor for biochip tech

Australia-based Archer Materials has developed a graphene-based field effect transistor (gFET) that can operate in wet environments. The gFET device is a sensing component which will be used in medical applications, like for digitizing biologically-relevant signals such as those from target analytes of viruses or bacteria. The biochip innovation will be integrated with advanced microfluidic systems to allow the manufacturing of mini lab-on-a-chip device platforms designed for medical diagnostics.

The company explained that the integration of gFETs with on-chip microfluidics potentially enables multiplexing, such as the ability to parallelize the detection of multiple biologically relevant targets in droplet-size liquid samples on a chip. The innovation can prevent liquids from shorting the integrated circuit, while simultaneously obtaining electronic signals using the liquid as part of the device. 

Read the full story Posted: Oct 24,2022

Researchers use graphene FET biosensor for simultaneous detection of influenza and SARS-CoV-2

Researchers from University of Texas at Austin have developed an antibody (Ab)-modified graphene field effect transistor (GFET)-based biosensor for precise and rapid influenza A virus (IAV) and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) protein detection and differentiation.

The sensor chip that was developed comprised of four GFETs in a quadruple arrangement, separated by polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) enclosures. Every quarter was biochemically functionalized with SARS-CoV-2 and IAV antigen-targeted Abs, one chemically passivated control, and one bare control. The third (chemically passivated) GFET was deployed to ensure that the results observed were due to Ab-antigen interaction rather than electronic fluctuations or drifts.

Read the full story Posted: Oct 18,2022

Researchers develop graphene-based synaptic transistors for neuromorphic computing

Researchers from The University of Texas at Austin and Sandia National Laboratories have developed graphene-based synaptic transistors for brain-like computers. These transistors are similar to synapses in the brain, that connect neurons to each other.

"Computers that think like brains can do so much more than today's devices," said Jean Anne Incorvia, an assistant professor at The University of Texas at Austin and the lead author on the paper. "And by mimicking synapses, we can teach these devices to learn on the fly, without requiring huge training methods that take up so much power."

Read the full story Posted: Aug 15,2022

Researchers design method to produce single-crystal graphene sheets on large-scale electrically insulating supports

Researchers from KAUST, Lanzhou University, Xiamen University, Friedrich Schiller University Jena and Ulsan have presented a method to produce single-crystal graphene sheets on large-scale electrically insulating supports. This approach could promote the development of next-generation nanomaterial-based devices, such as light and thin touchscreens, wearable electronics and solar cells.

Most graphene-based electronic devices require insulating supports. Yet, high-quality graphene films destined for industrial use are typically grown on a metal substrate, such as copper foil, before being transferred to an insulating support for device fabrication. This transfer step can introduce impurities that affect how well the device performs. Efforts to grow graphene on insulating supports have thus not been successful in producing the required high-quality single crystals.

Read the full story Posted: Apr 03,2022

INBRAIN Neuroelectronics signs an agreement to develop neurotechnology patented by six public research institutions

INBRAIN Neuroelectronics has signed an agreement for the exploitation and development of three patents and a trade secret, mainly held by the Institute of Microelectronics of Barcelona (IMB-CNM) of the Spanish Council for Scientific Research (CSIC), the Catalan Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology (ICN2), the Institució Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avançats (ICREA) and the Biomedical Research Centre Network CIBER BBN. The Universitat Autónoma de Barcelona (UAB) and the Institut de Investigacions Biomèdiques August Pi i Sunyer (IDIBAPS) are also co-owners of the patents. This is a successful process of technology transfer in a public-private collaboration with multiple research institutions.

The company will carry out the development and manufacturing of these technologies within the Institut Català de Nanociència i Nanotecnologia (ICN2) and the Micro and Nanofabrication Clean Room of the Institute of Microelectronics of Barcelona (IMB-CNM) of the CSIC.

Read the full story Posted: Mar 15,2022