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Graphene enables solar-powered "electronic skin" with sensing abilities

Mar 23, 2017

Researchers at the University of Glasgow have used graphene to develop a robotic hand with solar-powered skin, which may open the door to the development of prosthetic limbs or robots with a sense of touch.

Graphene prosthetic hand image

The team created the skin with the help of a single atomic layer of graphene, in a method that includes integrating power-generating photovoltaic cells into the electronic skin. The scientists say that “Whatever light is available, 98 percent is going and hitting the solar cell”, explaining that a solar panel is located just under the surface of the clear graphene skin. “it is generating power that can be used to get the sensitivity, the tactile feeling”.

Nanomedical Diagnostics announces partnership with Rogue Valley Microdevices to deliver graphene biosensors

Mar 09, 2017

Nanomedical Diagnostics announced a partnership with Rogue Valley Microdevices to deliver their graphene-based biosensors, AGILE R100. The partnership between Nanomedical Diagnostics and Rogue Valley Microdevices will open the novel sensing technique to any pharmaceutical company seeking to characterize biomolecules quickly and easily.

Nanomedical Diagnostics Agile R100 photo

The AGILE R100 is designed to provide biophysical data to pharmaceutical and biotherapeutics companies seeking more informed decisions earlier in the drug discovery process. However, the company also plans a significant impact on the healthcare industry with innovative new products that enable cutting-edge life science research, drug discovery applications, and diagnostic and health monitoring platforms.

Graphene may grant control over terahertz waves

Mar 07, 2017

Researchers from the University of Geneva, working with the Federal Polytechnic School in Zurich (ETHZ) and two Spanish research teams, have come up with a technique based on the use of graphene that allows for terahertz waves to be controlled accurately. This discovery paves the way for a practical use of terahertz waves, in particular for imaging and telecommunications.

Graphene to allow control over terahertz waves image

Terahertz waves allow for the detection of materials that are undetectable at other frequencies, but the use of these waves is limited by the absence of suitable devices and materials allowing to control them. The team developed a technique in which graphene allows for the potentially very quick control of both the intensity and the polarization of terahertz light. "The interaction between terahertz radiation and the electrons in graphene is very strong and we have therefore come to the hypothesis that it should be possible to use graphene to manage terahertz waves," the team explains.

Graphene enables non-metal magnet

Mar 07, 2017

Researchers at the Czech Republic created magnetized carbon by treating graphene layers with non-metallic elements, said to be the first non-metal magnet to maintain its magnetic properties at room temperature. The researchers say such magnetic graphene-based materials have potential applications in the fields of spintronics, biomedicine and electronics.

By treating graphene with other non-metallic elements such as fluorine, hydrogen, and oxygen, the scientists were able to create a new source of magnetic moments that communicate with each other even at room temperature. This discovery is seen as "a huge advancement in the capabilities of organic magnets".

Researchers use graphene oxide to design a low-cost system that captures cells efficiently

Mar 05, 2017

Researchers at MIT and National Chiao Tung University have designed a graphene oxide-based system that could make it possible to capture and analyze individual cells from a small sample of blood, potentially leading to very low-cost diagnostic systems that could be used almost anywhere.

Graphene oxide captures cells image

The new system, based on specially treated sheets of graphene oxide. The team explains that the key to the new process is heating the graphene oxide at relatively mild temperatures. This low-temperature annealing makes it possible to bond particular compounds to the material's surface. These compounds in turn select and bond with specific molecules of interest, including DNA and proteins, or even whole cells. Once captured, those molecules or cells can then be subjected to a variety of tests.