Graphene takes part in $4.4 million international initiative for early diagnosis of brain cancer

Sep 05, 2017

The European Commission recently awarded nearly €3.7 million ($4.4 million USD) to an international initiative in the field of early diagnosis of brain cancer. The four-year program, which will be led by Plymouth University, is called An Integrated Platform for Developing Brain Cancer Diagnostic Techniques, or AiPBAND. It will focus on gliomas with specific objectives to identify new blood biomarkers for the disease, design plasmonic-based, graphene-based, and digital ELISA assay-based multiplex biosensors; and to develop a big data-empowered intelligent data management infrastructure and cloud-based diagnostic systems.

Through the initiative, which also includes partner organizations from China, an estimated 14 research fellows will be trained by academic and private sector experts from participating organizations in fields including neuroscience, engineering, healthcare, and economics. Individual research projects under the nonprofit Vitae Researcher Development Framework will be arranged into local training courses, network-wide events, secondments, and personalized career development plans with private sector involvement, according to Plymouth University.

NSF grant to fund development of inkjet-printed graphene-based water quality sensors

Sep 04, 2017

The National Science Foundation recently awarded University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee scientists $1.5 million to perfect a method of mass-producing graphene-based small water sensors using inkjet printing. The goal is to determine whether the process can be customized in order to scale up production and in a more economic way than traditional manufacturing methods.

Inkjet-printed graphene-based water quality sensors image

The graphene-based sensors, developed at UWM, reportedly outperform current technologies in accuracy, sensitivity and sensing speed. Their performance and size make them useful for continuously monitoring drinking water for miniscule traces of contaminants like lead.

Graphene enables detection of single photons

Sep 04, 2017

A team of researchers led by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Raytheon BBN Technologies developed a new device that can detect single photons across a wide range of the electromagnetic spectrum, from the higher energy visible to much lower energy radio frequencies. The device consists of a sheet of graphene contacted on two ends by superconductors - a configuration called a Josephson junction.

Graphene-based single photon detector image

The ability to detect terahertz and microwave photons in this way could allow for observations of some of the faintest objects in the universe, say the researchers who report on the new technique, “as well as open up new opportunities in quantum information processing.”

Theragnostic Technologies receives grant to expand its graphene-based contrast agent platform to X-Ray CT procedures

Sep 03, 2017

Theragnostic Technologies logoIn 2012, researchers from Stony Brook University established Theragnostic Technologies to develop a new efficient and cost-effective graphene-based MRI contrast agent. In 2015 Theragnostic launched the product, called ManGraDex, which needs several of years of clinical trials before it can be commercialized (the company aims for 2022 or 2023).

Theragnostic Technologies now announced that it has received a new SBIR phase-1 grant from the NIH to extend the ManGraDex platform for use in X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) imaging. The company will demonstrate the preclinical safety and efficacy of a novel graphene-enhanced CT contrast agent for imaging and monitoring in patients with renal failure or at risk of contrast induced nephropathy.

Connecticut team designs a unique process for exfoliating graphene

Aug 31, 2017

Researchers at the University of Connecticut, assisted by ones from the University of Akron, have patented a unique process for exfoliating graphene, as well as manufacturing innovative graphene nanocomposites that have potential uses in a variety of applications.

The new process doesn’t require any additional steps or chemicals to produce graphene in its pristine form. “The innovation and technology behind our material is our ability to use a thermodynamically driven approach to un-stack graphite into its constituent graphene sheets, and then arrange those sheets into a continuous, electrically conductive, three-dimensional structure” says the lead scientist in the study. “The simplicity of our approach is in stark contrast to current techniques used to exfoliate graphite that rely on aggressive oxidation or high-energy mixing or sonication – the application of sound energy to separate particles – for extended periods of time. As straightforward as our process is, no one else had reported it. We proved it works”.

Researchers manipulate graphene to bring it closer to transistor applications

Aug 30, 2017

Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Ames Laboratory successfully manipulated the electronic structure of graphene, which may enable the fabrication of graphene transistors that could be faster and more reliable than existing silicon-based transistors.

Ames Lab manipulates graphene image

The researchers were able to theoretically calculate the mechanism by which graphene’s electronic band structure could be modified with metal atoms. The work will guide experimentally the use of the effect in layers of graphene with rare-earth metal ions “sandwiched” (intercalated) between graphene and its silicon carbide substrate. Since the metal atoms are magnetic, the additions can also modify the use of graphene for spintronics.

Versarien - Think you know graphene? Think again!Versarien - Think you know graphene? Think again!