The Graphene Light project recieves funds to produce prototype devices

In May 2017 we reported the the Institute of Low Temperature and Structure Research (Wroclaw, Poland) developed a new efficient white light source that uses graphene foam excitated by a continuous-wave laser. We have seen a demonstration of the technology at IDTechEx 2019 (see video below).

We have recently spoken with Prof. Krzysztof Piech who updated us on the project's process. Prof. Piech tells us that the research team received a grant of around $130,000 to develop the technology, and are expecting to soon receive a $270,000 grant that will enable the production of a series of prototypes. We hope to update once these prototypes can be demonstrated.

The Graphene Light project demonstrates its laser graphene foam lighting device

In May 2017 we reported on a new project at the Institute of Low Temperature and Structure Research (Wroclaw, Poland) that developed a new efficient white light source that uses graphene foam excitated by a continuous-wave laser.

The project is still in progress, and the researchers demonstrated the technology at IDTechEx Graphene & 2D Materials Europe 2019 earlier this month, as can be seen in our video above.

Researchers explain the phenomenon of particle-antiparticle annihilation in graphene

Researchers from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (MIPT) in Russia and Tohoku University in Japan have explained the phenomenon of particle-antiparticle annihilation in graphene, recognized by specialists as Auger recombination.

Teams explain the phenomenon of particle-antiparticle annihilation in graphene imageTwo scenarios of electron-hole recombination in graphene: radiative recombination (left) and Auger recombination (right) in which the energy is picked up by an electron passing by

Despite persistently being spotted in experiments, it was thought to be prohibited by the fundamental physical laws of energy and momentum conservation. The theoretical explanation of this process has until recently remained one of the greatest puzzles of solid-state physics.

Graphene-gold lenses could enable advanced lasers, holography technologies and telecommunications

Researchers at the Institute for Basic Science (IBS, South Korea), in collaboration with teams from the University of Birmingham and the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), have developed unique graphene-based lenses with tunable features. These optical devices, made of graphene and a punctured gold surface, could become optical components for advanced applications like amplitude tunable lenses, lasers (i.e. vortex phase plates), and dynamic holography.

Graphene and gold metalenses grant unique abilities image

The scientists explain that metasurfaces are new 2D materials that can effectively control the electric and magnetic components of light (and other electromagnetic waves) and bend them to chosen directions. Controlling the beam's direction can bring out interesting phenomena; the most incredible being the "invisibility cloak effect", where light waves bypass an object recreating the image beyond the object.

Graphene Flagship team designs graphene-based terahertz absorbers

Researchers from CNR-Istituto Nanoscienze, Italy and the University of Cambridge, UK, associated with the ​Graphene Flagship, have shown that it is possible to create a terahertz saturable absorber using graphene, produced by liquid phase exfoliation and deposited by transfer coating and ink jet printing. The paper reports a terahertz saturable absorber with an order of magnitude higher absorption modulation than other devices produced to date.

Graphene based Terahertz Absorbers by Graphene Flagship image

A terahertz saturable absorber decreases its absorption of light in the terahertz range (far infrared) with increasing light intensity and has great potential for the development of terahertz lasers, with applications in spectroscopy and imaging. These high-modulation, mode-locked lasers open up many prospects in applications where short time scale excitation of specific transitions are important, such as time-resolved spectroscopy of gasses and molecules, quantum information or ultra-high speed communication.