Graphene Manufacturing Group to raise $700,000 in a private placement

Australia-based Graphene Manufacturing Group (GMG) announced that it is set to raise $900,000 CDN (around $715,000 USD) in a private placement. The follows the company's $10 million CDN public offering announced earlier this month, and represents the significant orders for the company's shares in the earlier offering.

In June 2021 GMG published the latest updates on its coin cell graphene aluminum-ion battery. GMG went public in April 2021 and trades at the TSX Venture Exchange in Canada (ticker: GMG).

Researchers succeed in creating single-crystal, large-area, fold-free monolayer graphene

A team of researchers, led by Director Rod Ruoff at the Center for Multidimensional Carbon Materials (CMCM) within the Institute for Basic Science (IBS) and including graduate students at the Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), has achieved growth and characterization of large area, single-crystal graphene totally free from wrinkles, folds, or adlayers. It was said to be 'the most perfect graphene that has been grown and characterized, to date'.

Director Ruoff notes: “This pioneering breakthrough was due to many contributing factors, including human ingenuity and the ability of the CMCM researchers to reproducibly make large-area single-crystal Cu-Ni(111) foils, on which the graphene was grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) using a mixture of ethylene with hydrogen in a stream of argon gas.” Student Meihui Wang, Dr. Ming Huang, and Dr. Da Luo along with Ruoff undertook a series of experiments of growing single-crystal and single-layer graphene on such ‘home-made’ Cu-Ni(111) foils under different temperatures.

New graphene material could enable the fabrication of high-performance electrodes for sodium batteries

Researchers from Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, Accurion GmbH, Germany and Institute of Organic Synthesis and Photoreactivity (ISOF) at the National Research Council of Italy have presented a novel concept for fabricating high-performance electrode materials for sodium batteries. It is based on a novel type of graphene to store one of the world's most common and cheap metal ions – sodium. The results of their study show that the capacity can match today’s lithium-ion batteries.

Sodium, unlike lithium, is an abundant low-cost metal, and a main ingredient in seawater. This makes sodium-ion batteries an interesting and sustainable alternative for reducing our need for critical raw materials. However, one major challenge is increasing the capacity. At the current level of performance, sodium-ion batteries cannot compete with lithium-ion cells. One limiting factor is the graphite, which is used as the anode in today’s lithium-ion batteries.

Twisted bi-layer graphene displays unique quantum behavior

Scientists studying two different configurations of bilayer graphene have detected electronic and optical interlayer resonances. In these resonant states, electrons bounce back and forth between the two atomic planes in the 2-D interface at the same frequency. By characterizing these states, they found that twisting one of the graphene layers by 30 degrees relative to the other, instead of stacking the layers directly on top of each other, shifts the resonance to a lower energy. From this result they deduced that the distance between the two layers increased significantly in the twisted configuration, compared to the stacked one. When this distance changes, so do the interlayer interactions, influencing how electrons move in the bilayer system. An understanding of this electron motion could inform the design of future quantum technologies for more powerful computing and more secure communication.

“Today’s computer chips are based on our knowledge of how electrons move in semiconductors, specifically silicon,” said first and co-corresponding author Zhongwei Dai, a postdoc in the Interface Science and Catalysis Group at the Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN) at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)’s Brookhaven National Laboratory. “But the physical properties of silicon are reaching a physical limit in terms of how small transistors can be made and how many can fit on a chip. If we can understand how electrons move at the small scale of a few nanometers in the reduced dimensions of 2-D materials, we may be able to unlock another way to utilize electrons for quantum information science.”

Recent research and industry news on graphene oxide

Graphene oxide (GO), a form of graphene that includes oxygen-containing groups, has been the focus of much talk and speculation lately - most of which centered around its potential use in medical contexts.

Graphene Oxide vs Graphene scheme

However, GO is an interesting material all on its own, with great potential for various other uses and applications. It is studied for use in areas like membranes for audio devices and water filtration, sensors, solar cells, batteries and more.

Haydale's graphene inks used in garments worn by British athletes at the Tokyo Olympic Games

Haydale has announced that, following its announcement of positive prototype testing on 3rd March 2020, its range of advanced wearable technology - integrated into garments for elite athletes - was used in Tokyo by British athletes, including top medal winning athletes.

The garments generate heat using Haydale's printed functionalized graphene ink and incorporate electronic circuitry to produce temperature regulated panels. The plan is to use them at future international competitions, and subsequently to make them available commercially to other professional sports.

Haydale files joint patent with Airbus as part of GraCELS-2 project

Haydale has filed a joint patent with Airbus which covers the intellectual property jointly generated by Haydale and Airbus under the multi-party NATEP-supported Graphene Composites Evaluated in Lightning Strike Project, or GraCELS-2.

The group said that GraCELS-2 was designed to confirm that the 'incorporation of functionalized graphene/2D fillers could produce the next iteration of composite materials with significantly improved lightning strike performance compared to existing current carbon/epoxy systems alleviating the need for copper mesh'.

Graphene foam assists in building a "thermal switch" that dynamically moderates heat of electronic devices

lithium ion batteries used in extreme heat or cold can be prone to malfunctions and low performance. Purdue University engineers have developed a solution: a "thermal switch" made of compressible graphene foam, that dynamically adjusts to temperatures both inside and outside the device to maintain consistent thermal management.

“As electronic devices get smaller and more powerful, managing heat becomes a more crucial issue,” said Xiulin Ruan, professor of mechanical engineering, who studies nanoscale heat transfer and sustainable energy. “Most devices use passive thermal management, such as conduction and convection, to move excess heat. But this system isn’t tunable or adjustable, and doesn’t help at all in cold conditions.”

Researchers develop flexible and self-adaptive airflow sensor enabled by a graphene and CNTs membrane

Researchers at the Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering (NIMTE) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), led by Prof. Chen Tao, have developed a flexible and self-adaptive airflow sensor enabled by a graphene and CNTs membrane, which is mediated by the reversible microspring effect.

Airflow sensors based on the mechanical deformation mechanism have been drawing increasing attention thanks to their excellent flexibility and sensitivity. However, fabricating highly sensitive and self-adaptive airflow sensors via facile and controllable methods remains a challenge. Recently, inspired by the bats' wing membrane which shows unique airflow sensing capacity, the researchers at NIMTE prepared graphene/single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs)-Ecoflex membrane (GSEM), which can be arbitrarily transferred and subsequently adapt to diverse flat/bend and smooth/rough surface. Relying on the reversible microspring effect, the researchers developed a highly sensitive and self-adaptive GSEM-based airflow sensor.