New method creates sub-10-nm GNRs from squashed carbon nanotubes

Researchers at Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Stanford University, and other US and China institutes have designed a strategy for creating graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) with smooth edges that are below 10 nm in width. This new method is based on the use of squashed carbon nanotubes (CNTs).

The team explained that the idea behind this new work is that if carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can be squashed into GNRs, it would be possible to produce narrow (sub-5-nm wide) GNRs from CNTs that have small diameters. The team said that the GNRs prepared using this method would be much narrower than those obtained by previous methods.

G6 Materials reports a 110% increase in its yearly revenues

G6 Materials (Formerly called Graphene 3D Lab) reported its financial results for its fiscal year which ended on May 31, 2021. The company's revenues reached $1.9 million, a 110% increase from last year. G6M attributes most of its growth to strong demand for its air purification products and graphene-related consulting services.

G6 Materials banner

G6 Materials' comprehensive loss decreased by 6% to $938,600. At the end of the year, total assets grew 407% to $5.9 million.

Novel graphene fiber electrode could assist in developing advanced therapies in bioelectronic medicine

An international team that included researchers from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Electromaterials Science (ACES) and the University of Houston has helped progress electroceutical research for treatment of diseases including rheumatoid arthritis, colitis and sepsis.

Coating steps of sutrodes imageCoating steps of extruded Pt-rGO electrodes. Image from article

The team released their latest paper, that builds on previous studies where the team reported on the 'Sutrode' - a graphene based electrode created using the fabrication technique known as fiber wet spinning.

Haydale launches next-gen graphene-enhanced 3D printing materials

A few years ago, several graphene producers released 3D printing materials enhanced with graphene. These materials enabled conductive non-metal materials, and enhanced the mechanical and thermal properties of these 3D printing filaments.

The market reaction, though, to these materials was cool. The materials did not provide a significant improvement, the price was high, and there were better alternatives available.

Mason Graphite announces commercial use of graphene-enhanced concrete

Mason Graphite has announced that graphene resulting from the patented process owned by Black Swan Graphene and produced by Black Swan’s strategic shareholder Thomas Swan was recently used in the concrete mix poured during the construction of a large residential development in the United Kingdom.

Nationwide Engineering Group, a construction-focused service provider with dedicated integrated companies, has used the graphene-enhanced concrete developed by Concretene, a wholly-owned subsidiary, in a residential development in Salisbury, 150 km west of London, England.

Researchers take a closer look at a mysterious graphene oxide phenomenon

A team of researchers at UNSW has observed a unique phenomenon in graphene oxide (GO). The oxygen atoms in GO are normally attached in a rather chaotic way. At elevated temperatures, however, the oxygen atoms form more organized structures – by themselves. This process of ‘self-organization’ was found to drastically improve various properties of GO – for example, its electrical conductivity.

UNSW scientists solve decade-old graphene oxide puzzle image

For years, researchers have been aware that this phenomenon existed, but they could only demonstrate it using computational simulations. The new research, led by Dr. Rakesh Joshi at UNSW, successfully observed it for the first time in real life, using cutting-edge electron microscopy. While common microscopes use light to create a magnified image, electron microscopes use electrons. With this type of microscope, it is possible to observe single atoms, by magnifying what you’re looking at by a factor of 1,000,000.

GMG to support Queensland University of Technology pilot for piezo-supercapacitors for self-powered medical implants

Graphene Manufacturing Group (GMG) has formalized its support to Queensland University of Technology – Centre for Biomedical Technologies (“CBT”) for the development of Piezo-Supercapacitors for Self-Powered Medical Implants through a pilot project agreement. The Agreement details GMG’s contribution of expertise and graphene for the project.

GMG Supports Queensland University of Technology project for supercapacitors for medical implants image

The initial Industry Engagement Grant entitled “Piezoelectric Supercapacitors for Self-Powered Medical Implants” was awarded to Professor Cameron Brown, Associate Professor Deepak Dubal, Dr. Hong Duc Pham and the Chief Scientific Officer of GMG, Dr. Ashok Kumar Nanjundan.

Iceni Labs enters MoU with 2DM to develop graphene-based products for the defense, automotive and aerospace markets

Iceni Labs, a spin-out from Imperial College London, has signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) with Singapore’s 2D Materials (2DM) that will see the companies combine their respective expertise to develop and market graphene-based products for the defense, automotive and aerospace markets in Europe, North America and the Middle East.

Iceni Labs, a spin-out from Imperial College London, aims to exploit the properties of graphene for devices aimed at the defense market. 2DM manufactures graphene as an additive to enhance the properties of many industrial materials. The MoU will explore the potential to use 2DM’s graphene as an industrial additive to enhance the properties of Iceni Labs-developed industrial products including microphones, weapons optics devices and coatings.