Article last updated on: Jan 29, 2019

The latest graphene ink news:

Tata Steel updates on graphene products development

The Tata group is a global enterprise, headquartered in India, comprising over 100 independent operating companies. Tata Steel, the flagship company of the Tata group, is a Fortune 500 Company with immense global reach. TV Narendran, Managing Director of Tata Steel, provided updates on the Company's graphene R&D business.

Tata Steel is working with graphene as part of its plan of focusing on developing advanced material to protect its margin and bottom line. Its Graphene Development Center has recently produced corrosion-resistant graphene paint and supplied graphene powder to renowned tyre companies. It has also demonstrated the potential of graphene inks, which are used in the printing of train tickets, plane boarding passes, and RFID (radio-frequency identification) tags.

Manchester University to host a "Graphene Hackathon"

Manchester University’s Graphene Engineering Innovation Center (GEIC) is to host the world’s first Graphene Hackathon on Saturday 16 and Sunday 17 November 2019, in which teams will compete to develop and prototype innovative product ideas using conductive graphene inks.

The GEIC, which specializes in the rapid development and scale up of graphene and other 2D materials applications will host the event over 24 hours. IP, business and technical expertise will be on hand to help develop your innovative ideas, requiring no prior experience with graphene or programming.

Versarien to develop graphene-enhanced sportswear with Asian partner

Versarien LogoVersarien recently shared it has signed a letter of intent with its textile collaboration partner to launch sportswear containing Versarien's graphene ink technology.



Versarien said the letter is non-binding, covering the intention of Versarien and the undisclosed Asia-headquartered company partner to "enter into a formal commercial relationship regarding an initial launch of high performance sportswear".

Researchers produce graphene by mixing oxidized graphite with bacteria

Researchers at the U.S-based University of Rochester, along with colleagues at Delft University of Technology in the Netherlands, have designed a way to produce graphene materials using a novel technique: mixing oxidized graphite with bacteria. Their method is reportedly a more cost-efficient, time-saving, and environmentally friendly way of producing graphene materials versus those produced chemically, and could lead to the creation of innovative computer technologies and medical equipment.

Bacterially-made graphene is faster, cheaper and better imageFrom left to right:graphite (Gr), graphene oxide (GO), microbially‐reduced graphene oxide (mrGO), and chemically‐reduced graphene oxide (crGO)

"For real applications you need large amounts," says Anne S. Meyer, an associate professor of biology at the University of Rochester. "Producing these bulk amounts is challenging and typically results in graphene that is thicker and less pure. This is where our work came in". In order to produce larger quantities of graphene materials, Meyer and her colleagues started with a vial of graphite. They exfoliated the graphite-shedding the layers of material-to produce graphene oxide (GO), which they then mixed with the bacteria Shewanella. They let the beaker of bacteria and precursor materials sit overnight, during which time the bacteria reduced the GO to a graphene material.

Graphene Flagship partners launch rocket to test the possibilities of printing graphene inks in space

Graphene Flagship partners, Université Libre de Bruxelles, University of Pisa and the University of Cambridge, in collaboration with the European Space Agency (ESA) and the Swedish Space Corporation (SSC), recently launched The Materials Science Experiment Rocket (MASER) into space. The objective is to test the printing of graphene patterns on silicon substrates in zero gravity conditions.

New graphene experiment launches into space image

The experiment aims to test the possibilities of printing graphene inks in space. Studying the different self-assembly modes of graphene into functional patterns in zero-gravity will enable the fabrication of graphene electronic devices during long-term space missions, as well as help understand fundamental properties of graphene printing on Earth. This mission is also a first step towards the investigation of graphene for radiation shielding purposes, an essential requirement of manned space exploration.