Article last updated on: Jan 29, 2019

The latest graphene ink news:

Researchers develop graphene-based supercapacitor to power wearable skin sensors

Researchers from the Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology in South Korea have recently developed a low-cost energy storage device to power electronic devices like wearable skin sensors. The supercapacitor, made with graphene ink that is sprayed onto flexible substrates, can be used for remote medical monitoring and diagnosis on wearable devices.

Graphene inks enable flexible and mechanically durable planar supercapacitors image

Materials scientist Sungwon Lee shared that as the demand for wearable devices and remote diagnosis has increased, scientists have focused on developing electronic skin devices. The team focused on "extremely tiny and flexible energy devices as a power source."

Haydale signs collaboration agreements with Dowty Propellers

Haydale logoHaydale has announced the signing of contracts for the provision of services for the collaborative development of graphene and nano material enhanced products for use in Dowty Propellers’ products. Haydale will assist Dowty in examining the feasibility and development of various material technologies, pertinent to Dowty’s future product development, involving the incorporation of graphene and other nano materials.



Haydale will work with Dowty to develop erosion-resistant coatings with the addition of Haydale’s proprietary Silicone Carbide (SiC) Microfibers. Further development work is ongoing to establish the feasibility of potential industry-changing technology for the turboprop sector. In addition to these topics, Haydale will develop graphene-enhanced functional inks for strain sensing using its surface engineered HDPlas graphene nanomaterials.

Understanding the "coffee ring effect" leads to better graphene and 2D inks

Researchers from Imperial College London, Durham University, University of Cambridge, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Zhejiang University, Beihang University, Nanjing Tech University, Macquarie University, University of British Columbia and Aalto University have collaborated to examine the "coffee ring effect" which has been hindering the industrial deployment of functional inks with graphene, 2D materials, and nanoparticles because it makes printed electronic devices behave irregularly.

Ink examples and corresponding optical micrographs of printed single lines on Si/SiO2 image

The team of researchers has now created a new family of inks that overcomes this problem, enabling the fabrication of new electronics such as sensors, light detectors, batteries and solar cells.

Zen Graphene Solutions moves forward with applying its virucidal graphene ink in PPE applications

ZEN Graphene Solutions has announced it has commenced collaborations with research teams at a number of personal protective equipment (PPE) manufacturers to incorporate ZEN’s virucidal graphene ink into commercial products, including masks, gloves, gowns and other clothing following Zen’s promising results for an antiviral, graphene-based ink formulation from The University of Western Ontario’s ImPaKT Facility, biosafety Level 3 lab.

The company continues to optimize its proprietary formulation for dosage and delivery mechanism for highest antiviral impact. The next phase of testing is currently underway at the ImPaKT Facility and includes a preferred mask fabric coated in ZEN’s virucidal ink exposed to and tested against the COVID-19 virus.