Graphenea launches $99 miniGFET fully-packaged devices

Graphenea launched two new products out of its Graphene Foundry, which they call mGFET or miniGFET. This is Graphenea's highest value-chain products, which are manufactured and packaged in chip carriers, and can be used together with the freshly released Graphenea Card for seamless sensor development.

Graphenea miniGFET photo

The mGFET is available from $99, and as it is a fully-package device, it is ready to be integrated into standard electronics. Order volume can range from a few devices for early prototyping, to JEDEC trays with hundreds of devices which are compatible with automated pick & place routines.

Graphenea Foundry launches new GFET process

This is a sponsored post by Graphenea

Graphenea has announced that, following the release of its GFET S30, it has developed a High-K Metal Gate (HKMG) manufacturing process to create Field-Effect Transistor (FET) structures on graphene, or GFETs. This process is now available under the dedicated GFAB service, starting February 2022.

Graphenea High-K Metal Gate (HKMG) manufacturing process image

HKMG structures triggered a revolution in Si electronics when they were introduced during the early 2000’s, creating an alternative to SiO2 gate dielectrics that paved the way for further scaling. HKMG technology indeed enabled Moore’s law to continue, providing increased capacitance and lower current leakage than the previously state-of-the-art SiO2 tech. The most common FET architecture to modulate the conductance in graphene uses a SiO2 gate dielectric grown on top of a heavily doped Si substrate. Whereas this structure is easy to implement, it suffers from excessive current leakage when the SiO2 layer is thinned down, often rendering devices unusable. Moreover, the substrate acts as a global backgate, forbidding manipulation of individual GFET devices, which is essential for many applications.

Researchers design a graphene-based sensor that can detect opioids in wastewater

Researchers from Boston College, Boston University, and Giner Labs have designed a small graphene-based multiplexed bio-sensor that detects opioid byproducts in wastewater.

Graphene sensor rapidly detects opioids in wastewater image

The novel device uses graphene-based field effect transistors to detect four different synthetic and natural opioids at once, while shielding them from wastewater’s harsh elements. When a specific opioid metabolite attaches to a molecular probe on the graphene, it changes the electrical charge on the graphene. These signals are easily read electronically for each probe attached to the device.

Graphenea certified for medical device components

This is a sponsored post by Graphenea

Graphenea has obtained ISO 13485 certification for manufacturing medical device components. The certification relates to the GFET product line and the Graphene Foundry service.

Graphenea, graphene FETs (GFETs) photo

The ISO standard is an important certification needed for the commercialization of medical applications of graphene, in particular non-implantable biosensors. Graphenea obtained certification for the entire process chain, including raw materials, design, development, manufacture and sale. The certificate also applies to facilities, quality management, tracing, and data analysis. The ISO certificate was issued after an independent audit by SGS.

New graphene biosensor can detect SARS-CoV-2 in under a minute

Korean researchers have developed a graphene-based field-effect transistor-based biosensor that detects SARS-CoV-2 in nasopharyngeal swabs from patients with COVID-19, in less than one minute.

Covid-19 detection using graphene biosensor image

Currently, most diagnostic tests for COVID-19 rely on a technique called real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), which amplifies SARS-CoV-2 RNA from patient swabs so that tiny amounts of the virus can be detected. However, the method takes at least 3 hours, including a step to prepare the viral RNA for analysis. Edmond Changkyun Park, Seung Il Kim and colleagues wanted to develop a faster diagnostic test that could analyze patient samples directly from a tube of buffer containing the swabs, without any sample preparation steps.