Graphene is a one-atom-thick sheet of carbon atoms arranged in a honeycomb-like pattern. Graphene is considered to be the world's thinnest, strongest and most conductive material - of both electricity and heat. All of these properties are exciting researchers and businesses around the world - as graphene has the potential to revolutionize entire industries - in the fields of electricity, conductivity, energy generation, batteries, sensors and more.

Mechanical strength

Graphene is the world's strongest material, and can be used to enhance the strength of other materials. Dozens of researchers have demonstrated that adding even a trace amount of graphene to plastics, metals or other materials can make these materials much stronger - or lighter (as you can use a smaller amount of material to achieve the same strength).

applications of composites image

Such graphene-enhanced composite materials can find uses in aerospace, building materials, mobile devices, and many other applications.

Thermal applications

Graphene is the most heat conductive found to date. As graphene is also strong and light, it means that it is a great material for making heat-spreading solutions, such as heat sinks or heat dissipation films. This could be useful in both microelectronics (for example to make LED lighting more efficient and longer lasting) and also in larger applications - for example thermal foils for mobile devices. Huawei's latest smartphones, for example, have adopted graphene-based thermal films.

graphene-bulb-demonstration-image

Energy storage

Since graphene is the world's thinnest material, it also extremely high surface-area to volume ratio. This makes graphene a very promising material for use in batteries and supercapacitors. Graphene may enable batteries and supercapacitors (and even fuel-cells) that can store more energy - and charge faster, too.

Graphene battery advantages imageThe advantages of graphene batteries

Coatings ,sensors, electronics and more

Graphene has a lot of promise for additional applications: anti-corrosion coatings and paints, efficient and precise sensors, faster and efficient electronics, flexible displays, efficient solar panels, faster DNA sequencing, drug delivery, and more.

Graphene is such a great and basic building block that it seems that any industry can benefit from this new material. Time will tell where graphene will indeed make an impact - or whether other new materials will be more suitable.

The latest Graphene Application news:

Tachmed partners with St George’s, University of London, to advance graphene-based health diagnostic platform

Tachmed, a UK-based developer of at-home digital healthcare solutions, has teamed up with experts in infection control at St George’s, University of London, to help accelerate the development of a new diagnostic platform for a range of health conditions, using graphene biosensor technology. 

During the four-month collaboration, funded by an Innovate UK Accelerated Knowledge Transfer grant, Dr. Henry Staines, senior lecturer in global health at the Institute for Infection & Immunity at St George’s, will provide critical knowledge exchange. This is expected to boost development of the technology by optimizing Tachmed’s biosensor, which is required to confirm if a pathogen is present or not within a patient sample.

Read the full story Posted: May 04,2024

HydroGraph to supply graphene to Volfpack Energy for solar power battery storage

HydroGraph Clean Power has announced that its flagship graphene product, FGA-1, has been chosen by Volfpack Energy, a hardware company focused on using supercapacitor technology to increase the adoption of renewable energy across Asia. 

Its flagship product, fractal graphene, FGA-1, was chosen by Volfpack to be the base material of the supercapacitor design after Volfpack’s engineers determined that it outperformed materials traditionally used in supercapacitors, such as activated carbon, by 4x.

Read the full story Posted: May 02,2024

Zhik to provide graphene-enhanced water sports apparel to Australian Olympic Team sailors at the Paris Olympics

The Australian Olympic Committee (AOC) has welcomed Sydney sailing apparel company Zhik as an official supplier for Australian Olympic Team sailors at the Paris Olympics. 

The eco-friendly water sports apparel by Zhik will be made from sustainable, plant-based Yulex rubber, with superior thermal insulation, comfort and durability, all while generating 80% fewer CO2 emissions than conventional neoprene wetsuits. The fabric is infused with graphene, that can help return up to 20% more body heat, keeping bodies warmer for longer, regulating temperatures during low-intensity activities and aiding the drying process.

Read the full story Posted: May 02,2024

Black Swan launches GraphCore family of graphene nanoplatelets products

Black Swan Graphene has announced the commercialization of a new product, the GraphCore family of graphene nanoplatelets products. These products, now in full production volume, are tailored to meet a diverse range of needs within the polymer industry, offering various forms including powders and polymer-ready masterbatches.

According the the Company, in addition to double-digit tensile property improvements with less than 1.0% loading, performance enhancements seen at global customer industrial trials include:

* 25% weight reduction with 1.5% loading in TPU;
* More than 20% impact resistance improvement in PP at 0.2% loading; and
* More than 40% improvement in barrier properties in PLA at 1.0% loading.

Read the full story Posted: May 01,2024

Researchers develop deformable micro-supercapacitor via laser ablation patterning of Graphene/liquid metal

Researchers from Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH), Korea Institute of Industrial Technology and Konkuk University have reported the development of a small-scale energy storage device capable of stretching, twisting, folding, and wrinkling. 

Nine MSC units connected in three parallel and three series. Image from npj Flexible Electronics

Micro supercapacitors (MSCs) have emerged as a promising candidate for deformable energy storage, due to high-power density, rapid charging, and long cycle life. However, the fabrication of interdigitated electrode patterns capable of maintaining the energy storage performance under repeated stretching and twisting has remained a great challenge, because brittle materials like gold (Au) have been commonly used as an electrode.

Read the full story Posted: Apr 27,2024

Researchers achieve robust superconductivity in high magnetic fields using unique 1D system

An international team of researchers, led by the University of Manchester, has achieved robust superconductivity in high magnetic fields using a newly created one-dimensional system. Achieving superconductivity in the quantum Hall regime has been a longstanding challenge, which this recent work aimed to address. 

The team followed the conventional route where counterpropagating edge states were brought into close proximity to each other. However, this approach was found to be limited. “Our initial experiments were primarily motivated by the strong persistent interest in proximity superconductivity induced along quantum Hall edge states,” explained University of Mnchester's Dr. Barrier, the paper’s lead author. “This possibility has led to numerous theoretical predictions regarding the emergence of new particles known as non-abelian anyons.”

Read the full story Posted: Apr 26,2024

Researchers show that electrons in double-layer graphene move like particles without any mass

Researchers from the University of Göttingen, Japan's National Institute for Materials Science and Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) have demonstrated experimentally that electrons in naturally occurring double-layer graphene move like particles without any mass, in the same way that light travels. Furthermore, they have shown that the current can be "switched" on and off, which has potential for developing tiny, energy-efficient transistors. 

Among its many unusual properties, graphene is known for its extraordinarily high electrical conductivity due to the high and constant velocity of electrons travelling through this material. This unique feature has made scientists try to use graphene for faster and more energy-efficient transistors. The challenge has been that to make a transistor, the material needs to be controlled to have a highly insulating state in addition to its highly conductive state. In graphene, however, such a "switch" in the speed of the carrier cannot be easily achieved. In fact, graphene usually has no insulating state, which has limited graphene's potential a transistor.

Read the full story Posted: Apr 18,2024

First Graphene to test new graphene product designed for cement with Breedon Group

First Graphene has announced a third trial with one of the United Kingdom’s largest cement producers, Breedon Group, which will test an optimized formulation of the Company’s PureGRAPH-CEM® product under full-scale production conditions. This trial builds on the work recently conducted in exclusive collaboration with Breedon at its Hope Plant, which confirmed the Company’s ability to produce graphene enhanced cement at an industrial scale.

The third trial incorporates the technical and practical experiences obtained in the first two trials to further optimize the performance of First Graphene’s graphene nanoplatelets. The trial will primarily focus on testing a new grade of graphene, PureGRAPH-CEM®, under full- scale cement production conditions at Breedon’s Hope Cement Works facility in Derbyshire, United Kingdom.

Read the full story Posted: Apr 17,2024

Researchers use graphene oxide to develop devices that could advance future cellular therapy for multiple sclerosis patients

A team from the National Hospital for Paraplegics (SESCAM), in collaboration with the Materials Science Institute of Madrid (ICMM-CSIC), has shown how new cell culture devices based on graphene oxide maintain the anti-inflammatory function of myeloid suppressor cells (MDSCs) once isolated from the donor's body. This function could be crucial for advancing cellular therapy beneficial to people with multiple sclerosis. 

"To exert their inflammation-controlling function in diseases such as multiple sclerosis, myeloid suppressor cells must maintain a very immature state. However, when extracted from the bone marrow and cultured in the laboratory, they begin to mature, losing their immunosuppressive activity, rendering them unsuitable for potential cellular therapy for patients with this type of neurodegenerative disease," explains Diego Clemente, a researcher at the National Hospital for Paraplegics and one of the lead authors of the study.

Read the full story Posted: Apr 10,2024