Researchers develop washable, wearable graphene capacitors that can be woven directly into clothes

Researchers at the University of Cambridge and Jiangnan University in China have developed graphene-enhanced wearable electronic components incorporated directly into fabrics. The devices could be used for flexible circuits, healthcare monitoring, energy conversion, and other applications.

The researchers have shown how graphene and other related materials can be directly incorporated into fabrics to produce charge storage elements such as capacitors, paving the way to textile-based power supplies which are washable, flexible and comfortable to wear.

Graphene oxide layers made to mimic biological channels may clean up pharmaceuticals production

KAUST researchers have tailored the structure of graphene-oxide layers to mimic the shape of biological channels, creating ultra-thin membranes to rapidly separate chemical mixtures. This may have the potential to inspire new materials to clean up chemical and pharmaceutical production.

2D-dual-spacing channel membranes for high performance organic solvent nanofiltration image

"In making pharmaceuticals and other chemicals, separating mixtures of organic molecules is an essential and tedious task," says Shaofei Wang, postdoctoral researcher in Suzana Nuñes lab at KAUST. One option to make these chemical separations faster and more efficient is through selectively permeable membranes, which feature tailored nanoscale channels that separate molecules by size.

New graphene fiber combines the electrical properties of an electrode with the mechanical properties of a suture

Engineers at the University of Wollongong are collaborating with surgeons at the University of Texas at Dallas to develop materials that can provide targeted medical treatment. An emerging field called electroceuticals, where electrical stimulation is used to modify the behavior of tissues and organs affected by illness, reportedly shows promise.

Part of this research focuses on utilizing new material developments and additive manufacturing techniques to develop implantable structures that can monitor, maintain and restore function in neural tissues. However, one of the biggest barriers is finding electrode materials that can be safely implanted in the body. Materials like metal are too rigid and can damage tissues.

Graphene quantum dots could yield an effective antioxidant for various traumatic injuries

Researchers from Rice University, the Texas A&M Health Science Center and the McGovern Medical School at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) have found that graphene quantum dots drawn from common coal may be the basis for an effective antioxidant for people who suffer traumatic brain injuries, strokes or heart attacks.

Graphene quantum dots could yield an effective antioxidant for various traumatic injuries imageCoal-derived graphene quantum dots as seen under an electron microscope

The QDs' ability to quench oxidative stress after such injuries was the subject of a study, which showed that the biocompatible dots, when modified with a common polymer, are effective mimics of the body’s own superoxide dismutase, one of many natural enzymes that keep oxidative stress in check.

Archer Exploration prints human antibodies on graphene biosensors

Archer Exploration has printed and patterned ink formulations of human antibodies on graphene-based biosensor components derived from the company’s Campoona graphite. Archer reports that ink formulations comprised primarily of human antibody immunoglobulin G (IgG) as the active constituent were successfully prepared and printed using proprietary methods.

Archer Exploration prints human antibodies on graphene biosensors imageAn antibody ink formulation printed and patterned onto a resin-coated paper substrate

The IgG inks were printed on resin-coated paper and a number of graphene-based electrodes and were able to withstand the chemical and physical processes in the formulation, printing, and post-printing steps.