Cardea Bio and Nanosens Innovations merger-acquisition finalized

Cardea Bio (formerly: Nanomedical Diagnostics) and Nanosens Innovations have joined forces to accelerate the development of the Genome Sensor: the world's first DNA search engine that runs on CRISPR-Chip technology.

Cardea has announced the finalization of their merger-acquisition of Nanosens Innovations, the creators of CRISPR-Chip. Cardea first came out with the news of the proposed merger in September, along with the announcement of their Early Access Program for the Genome Sensor. Built with CRISPR-Chip technology, the Genome Sensor is the world’s first DNA search engine. It can google genomes to detect genetic mutations and variations.

Graphene enables fast and sensitive room-temperature nanomechanical bolometer

Scientists at the University of Oregon have designed a new method of measuring light—with the help of microscopic drums to hear light. The technology, known as a “graphene nanomechanical bolometer,” detects almost every color of light at high temperatures and high speeds.

A fast and sensitive room-temperature graphene nanomechanical bolometer image

“This tool is the fastest and most sensitive in its class,” said Benjamín Alemán, a professor of physics and a member of the University of Oregon’s Center for Optical, Molecular, and Quantum Science and an associate of the Phil and Penny Knight Campus for Accelerating Scientific Impact.

Rice team designs graphene-based air filter that grabs and zaps pathogens

Rice University team under chemist James Tour has transformed their laser-induced graphene (LIG) into self-sterilizing filters that grab pathogens out of the air and kill them with small pulses of electricity. This may be of special interest to hospitals, where according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, patients have a 1-in-31 chance of acquiring a potentially antibiotic-resistant infection during hospitalization.

Rice team creates self-sterilizing LIG air filters that show potential for use in hospitals image

The device reportedly captures bacteria, fungi, spores, prions, endotoxins and other biological contaminants carried by droplets, aerosols and particulate matter.

Smart insole with graphene sensors may become a lifesaving technology for diabetic patients

Stevens Institute of Technology (SIT), a private, coeducational research university located in New Jersey, United States, has signed an exclusive licensing agreement with Bonbouton for the right to use and further develop a graphene sensing system that detects early signs of foot ulcers before they form so people living with diabetes can access preventative healthcare and confidently manage their health.

Smart insole with a graphene sensing system that can help detect early signs of foot ulcers before they form image

The smart insole can be inserted into a sneaker or dress shoe to passively monitor the foot health of a person living with diabetes. The data are then sent to a companion app which can be accessed by the patient and shared with their healthcare provider, who can determine if intervention or treatment is needed.

Newly launched graphene-enhanced sanitary napkins enjoy great success in the US

Jewel Sanitary Napkins (JSN), a U.S-based company, launched its graphene-enhanced sanitary napkins on June 1st, 2019. In the several months since then (at the time of writing this article), the Company reportedly made over $600,000 from selling the $6 product.

Jewel sanitary pads layers image

The sanitary napkins come in four variations: very light panty liners, moderate flow sanitary napkins, heavy flow sanitary napkins and super heavy flow sanitary napkins. The graphene, said by the company to be a proprietary blend, is found in a single strip placed in the center of the pad (pad design can be viewed at jewelpads.com).