University of Manchester team develops graphene-based antibody test for detection of kidney disease

An interdisciplinary team of researchers from The University of Manchester have developed a new graphene-based testing system for disease-related antibodies, initially targeting a kidney disease called Membranous Nephropathy.

U of Manchester team develops graphene-based sensor for kidney diseases image

The new instrument, based on the principle of a quartz-crystal microbalance (QCM) combined with a graphene-based bio-interface, is said to offer a cheap, fast, simple and sensitive alternative to currently available antibody tests.

Researchers design graphene-based broadband detector of terahertz radiation

Scientists from Russia and Germany have created a graphene-based broadband detector of terahertz radiation. The device could have potential for applications in communication and next-generation information transmission systems, security and medical equipment.

Graphene detector reveals THz light’s polarization image(a) shows a top view of the device, with the sensitive region magnified in (b). The labels S, D, and TG denote the source, drain, and top gate. A side section of the detector is shown in (c). Image from MIPT

The new detector relies on the interference of plasma waves. Plasma waves in metals and semiconductors have recently attracted much attention from researchers around the world. Like the more familiar acoustic waves, the ones that occur in plasmas are essentially density waves, too, but they involve charge carriers: electrons and holes. Their local density variation gives rise to an electric field, which nudges other charge carriers as it propagates through the material. This is similar to how the pressure gradient of a sound wave impels the gas or liquid particles in an ever expanding region. However, plasma waves die down rapidly in conventional conductors.

Research team develops new method to generate precisely controlled graphene microbubbles

Researchers at Swinburne University of Technology recently teamed up with teams from National University of Singapore, Rutgers University, University of Melbourne, and Monash University, to develop a method to generate precisely controlled graphene microbubbles on a glass surface using laser pulses.

Schematic of optical setup for characterizing the GO microbubbles imageSchematic of optical setup for characterizing the GO microbubbles. Image from article

Microbubbles - around 1-50 micrometers in diameter - can have various applications like drug delivery, membrane cleaning, biofilm control, and water treatment. They've been applied as actuators in lab-on-a-chip devices for microfluidic mixing, ink-jet printing, and logic circuitry, and in photonics lithography and optical resonators. They also have great potential for other biomedical imaging and applications like DNA trapping and manipulation applications.

Caltech team develops sensor that rapidly detects COVID-19 infection

Caltech researchers have developed a new type of multiplexed test (a test that combines multiple kinds of data) with a low-cost sensor that may enable the at-home diagnosis of a COVID infection through rapid analysis of small volumes of saliva or blood, without the involvement of a medical professional, in under 10 minutes.

Caltech's graphene sensor rapidly detects COVID-19 infection imageWhen attached to supporting electronics, the sensor can wirelessly transmit data to the user's cell phone through Bluetooth. Credit: Caltech, image from Phys.org

The research was conducted in the lab of Wei Gao, assistant professor in the Andrew and Peggy Cherng department of medical engineering. Previously, Gao and his team developed wireless sensors that can monitor conditions such as gout, as well as stress levels, through the detection of extremely low levels of specific compounds in blood, saliva, or sweat.

Edmonton Airport to host trial of new graphene-based COVID-19 testing technology

It was recently reported that Edmonton International Airport (YEG) will host a trial for a new graphene-based COVID-19 testing technology that can produce results in seconds. The trials will be executed in partnership with GLC Medical, a subsidiary of Graphene Leaders Canada (GLC).

The test is conducted with a handheld unit that takes a saliva sample from a person and is expected to tell if someone has COVID-19 in under one minute, compared to other tests with longer laboratory-based waiting periods for results. This test promises many advantages, from its ease of use to the elimination of the nasal swab to direct virus detection.