Companies respond to graphene masks "health hazard" scare

Following recent concerns surrounding the use of graphene in face masks and Health Canada's warnings of "a potential that wearers could inhale graphene particles from some masks, which may pose health risks", several companies involved in the production of such masks released their comments on the matter.

Zen Graphene Solutions, which developed a graphene-based virucidal ink and reported that it has a 99% effectiveness against COVID-19, released a statement saying that it is aware of the recent claims, and "is aligned and supportive of the steps taken to regulate the use of graphene and remove products that are unsafe for the public". It went on to state that its own products have been found safe in various "comprehensive testing".

Graphene masks deemed "potential health hazard" by Canadian authorities

Despite the surge of graphene-enhanced face masks that's been evident lately, government authorities like Health Canada recently issued warnings on the use of such graphene masks, cautioning against "a potential that wearers could inhale graphene particles from some masks, which may pose health risks."

This potential threat is followed by the directive to not use these face masks, and Health Canada, for one, is advising Canadians not to use face masks that contain graphene at all. A recent PR stated: "Until the Department completes a thorough scientific assessment and has established the safety and effectiveness of graphene-containing face masks, it is taking the precautionary approach of removing them from the market while continuing to gather and assess information. Health Canada has directed all known distributors, importers and manufacturers to stop selling and to recall the affected products. Additionally, Health Canada has written to provinces and territories advising them to stop distribution and use of masks containing graphene. The Department will continue to take appropriate action to stop the import and sale of graphene face masks".

Inbrain Neuroelectronics closes €14.3 million round

Inbrain Neuroelectronics, spun-off from the Catalan Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology (ICN2) and Icrea (and associated with the Graphene Flagship) , recently announced closing a $16.85 million (€14.3 million) round led by Asabys and Alta. The company has also received financial backing from Cdti and two international investors.

Inbrain Neuroelectronics closes €14.3 million round image

NBRAIN Neuroelectronics was established in 2019 with the mission of developing brain-implants based on graphene technology for applications in patients with epilepsy, Parkinson’s, and other neuronal diseases. These smart devices, built around an innovative graphene electrode, will decode with high certainty neural signals from the brain and produce a therapeutic response adapted to the clinical condition of the specific patient.

Archer Materials reports progress on graphene-based lab-on-chip fabrication capabilities

Archer Exploration logo imageIn November 2020, Archer Materials announced its plan to develop a graphene-based lab-on-chip device. Now, the Company provided an update on the progress it has achieved - it demonstrated that it can fabricate nanosize biosensor components of 100-150 nanometer features on silicon wafers.

In the past, prior to Archer utilizing local semiconductor foundry fabrication techniques, it was limited to one sensor per ~1 cm2. Now, with its in-house capability, it has miniaturized key biosensor components to chip-formats on silicon by nanofabrication translating to approx. over 1 million sensor components within a 1 cm2 area.

Researchers produce extremely conductive graphene-enhanced hydrogel for medical applications

An interdisciplinary research team of the Research Training Group (RTG) 2154 "Materials for Brain" at Kiel University (CAU) has developed a method to produce graphene-enhanced hydrogels with an excellent level of electrical conductivity. What makes this method special is that the mechanical properties of the hydrogels are largely retained. The material is said to have potential for medical functional implants, for example, and other medical applications.

"Graphene has outstanding electrical and mechanical properties and is also very light," says Dr. Fabian Schütt, junior group leader in the Research Training Group, thus emphasizing the advantages of the ultra-thin material, which consists of only one layer of carbon atoms. What makes this new method different is the amount of graphene used. "We are using significantly less graphene than previous studies, and as a result, the key properties of the hydrogel are retained," says Schütt about the current study, which he initiated.